Ancient Beer and Brewing with Bettina Arnold

By Aislinn Sanders Recently, Bettina Arnold was interviewed by the Wisconsin Public Radio Morning Show and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel for her knowledge on ancient beer brewing methods. It is her hope that she can get those uninterested in conventional… Read More

Virtual Colloquium: A Retrospective: Twenty-Eight Years of the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery Project presented by Dr. Patricia B. Richards

Friday, October 9 2020 2:30 PM

This event will take place virtually via Zoom.

Come join us for our first-ever virtual colloquium presented by Dr. Patricia B. Richards on October 9th at 2:30 PM via Zoom!

A Retrospective: Twenty-Eight Years of the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery Project

From 1878 through 1974 Milwaukee County utilized four locations on the Milwaukee County Grounds in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin for the burial over 10,000 individuals, primarily paupers, the institutionalized, and the unidentified. Two archaeological excavations in 1991-1992 and again in 2013 resulted in the recovery of over 2,400 individuals from one of those cemetery locations. Curated by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s Archaeological Research Laboratory, the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery (MCPFC) individuals, artifacts, and associated archives represent one of the largest, if not the largest, archaeologically recovered, permanently curated skeletal collections in the United States. In addition to generating a substantial osteological data set, this project offers a model for crossing boundaries between cultural resource management, academic research, and social engagement at a time when the exhumation of the United States’ forgotten historic cemeteries has become increasingly common. As a project focused on a late 19th and early 20th century cemetery, the MCPFCP is situated not only within the history of historical archaeological research but is also influenced by the recent bioarchaeological trend of engaging with social theory to examine social identity and lived social experience. This talk summarizes the project to date within the overarching goal of returning a voice and an identity to individuals robbed of both by burial in the MCPFC.

Patricia Richards

Patricia Richards

Dr. Patricia B. Richards is a senior scientist in the Anthropology Department at UWM. She is also a Principal Investigator for UWM-CRM and has conducted cultural resource studies in Wisconsin, Michigan and Illinois since 1973. Her specialties include mortuary analysis and historic period archaeology in the Great Lakes region. She has served as project director of the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery Project since the collection was permanently moved to UWM in 2008 and directed the original excavations in 1990s.

How to Attend Meeting:

This meeting will take place virtually via the web conferencing app, Zoom. Please follow the instructions below to attend on the day and time of the colloquium. Thank you.

Join Zoom Meeting at 2:30 PM on October 9th.

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Meeting ID: 310 301 7900
Passcode: 9516145

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Ashley Brennaman wins Lambda Alpha Graduate Research Grant Award

Congratulations to the doctoral student Ashley Brennaman for winning the Lambda Alpha Graduate Research Grant Award! Sponsored by Lambda Alpha — the national honor society for anthropology — this award is one of only six given nationwide each year. Ashley’s… Read More

AIA Lecture Series: When Did Vesuvius Explode?

Sunday, February 9 2020 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Sabin Hall G90

Sunday, February 9, 2020, 3:00pm
Pedar Foss, Professor, Classical Studies, DePauw University, Indiana
Title: When Did Vesuvius Explode?

It has long been held, on the basis of a letter of Pliny the Younger, that Mt. Vesuvius erupted on 24 August, AD 79. But after excavators began to work at the sites of Herculaneum at Pompeii, some scholars expressed doubts, suggesting a date later in the autumn of that year. Debate has increased with recent paleo-environmental research and the find of an inscription last year. Scholars have divided over a topic that might appear trivial—after all, most archaeological sites never enjoy such a precise date. But it is an excellent case study for testing our methods of historical and archaeological research, and I will lift the lid on those methods.

Ruins at Pompeii with Mount Vesuvius in the background.

As part of a book project (Pliny and the Destruction of Vesuvius, Routledge 2021), I have collated, for the first time, every manuscript and printed edition of Pliny’s Letters 6.16 and 6.20, in order to track and analyze the literary tradition of the date through its surviving evidence. I have also compiled a reconstruction of the pre-eruption landscape and coastline, and collected all recent volcanological and archaeological research about the event. Having made a multidisciplinary reconstruction of what happened over the two terrifying days of the eruption, I can now offer an answer to the question of when Vesuvius exploded.

Pedar FossPedar W. Foss is Professor of Classical Studies at DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana, where he has worked since 1999. As a teacher, he conducts courses in Latin, ancient history and literature, and art and archaeology. He received his B.A. in Chemistry and Classics from Gustavus Adolphus College, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Classical Art and Archaeology from the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; he subsequently taught at the University of Cincinnati and at Stanford. His research concerns domestic life at Pompeii, landscape archaeology, and Geographic Information Systems. He has edited for the Journal of Roman Archaeology and was co-editor of the book reviews for the American Journal of Archaeology from 2008-2011. He has lived, studied, and worked for extended periods in Greece, Italy, Tunisia, Turkey, and England. He is a fanatical follower of football/futbol/soccer.

https://aia-milwaukee.uwm.edu/lectures/

AIA Lecture: Andrew L. Goldman presents “Helmets from the Sea: Military Finds from the Battle of the Aegates Islands (241 BCE)”

Sunday, September 29 2019 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Sabin Hall G90
3413 N. Downer Ave, Milwaukee, WI

Archaeological Institute of America Lecture: Dr. Eric H. Cline

Abstract: For more than three hundred years during the Late Bronze Age, from about 1500 BC to 1200 BC, the Mediterranean region played host to a complex international world in which Egyptians, Mycenaeans, Minoans, Hittites, Assyrians, Babylonians, Cypriots, and Canaanites… Read More

Dr. Patricia Richards Interviewed by WUWM Lake Effect’s Joy Powers

Click Here to listen to Dr. Richards talk about UWM Anthropology’s important work on the Milwaukee County Poor Farm project!  

Bettina Arnold is interviewed by WUWM about her research on feasting and fermentation

Bettina Arnold is interviewed by WUWM about her research on feasting and fermentation in connection with the Science and Culture of Fermentation certificate program: http://wuwm.com/post/uwm-professors-discuss-science-fermentation#stream/0