Don’t Miss Professor Nitzan Shoshen’s Upcoming Presentation: On the Immediacy of Home(land): Heimat politics in Germany – April 9th

Friday, April 9 2021 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Online via Zoom - See details above for more information or email Paul Brodwin at brodwin@uwm.edu

Join us for our first Anthropology Colloquium this year!

On the Immediacy of Home(land): Heimat politics in Germany by Nitzan Shoshen

Nitzan Shoshen is a political anthropologist who studies nationhood, governance and the political uses of affect and emotion. He is the author of the award-winning The Management of Hate: Nation, Affect and the and the Governance of Right-Wing Extremism in Germany (Princeton University Press 2016).  He received his PhD in Anthropology from the University of Chicago in 2008.  He a faculty member at the Colegio de México, a leading research institute in social sciences and the humanities.

See below for the link to view the Colloquium!

Time: Apr 9, 2021 03:00 PM Central Time (US and Canada)
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Meeting ID: 310 301 7900
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Meeting ID: 310 301 7900

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Anthro PhD Advances Fight against COVID in Milwaukee County

Alum Katinka Hooyer (PhD 2015), a medical anthropologist and assistant professor at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW), is working with community members to increase awareness about Covid-19 through the use of art and creative messaging. Read more about their… Read More

Virtual Colloquium: “Hearst Ginda Verde: Following a Textile Pattern, Unraveling a Global Mimetic Meshwork” presented by Dr. W. Warner Wood

Friday, September 18 2020 - Friday, September 18 2020 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Zoom Meeting

Come join us for our first-ever virtual colloquium presented by Dr. W. Warner Wood on September 18th at 3:00 PM via Zoom!

“Hearst Ginda Verde: Following a Textile Pattern, Unraveling a Global Mimetic Meshwork” 

This talk traces a textile pattern’s appearance in blankets currently being sold through Pendleton Wool Mills as “Hearst Ginda Verde.” Wood unravels the meandering story of this pattern from its origins in the late 1800s, to its reproduction by the business Santa Fe Interiors in the 1990s, and on to its more recent sale through Pendleton. The name of the pattern used in Pendleton marketing points to the well-known Navajo textile collection of William Randolph Hearst. Approaching the pattern ethnographically affords an exploration of the ways that indigenous weavers and others become entangled in global articulations and practices. Unraveling the story of the production, marketing, and sale of several textiles featuring this pattern points toward what Michael Taussig and Homi Bhabha have characterized as the disruptive capacities of mimetic practices and products and toward an emergent global mimetic “meshwork” of weavers, dealers, and consumers.

This talk is cosponsored with the UWM Center for 21st Century Studies

Bill Wood is an associate professor in Anthropology at UWM. He was a C21 Faculty Fellow for the 2019-20 academic year. His research is focused on the cultural politics of heritage in global context. He is the author of Made in Mexico: Zapotec Weavers and the Global Ethnic Art Market (Indiana U. Press, 2008), an ethnographic account that follows weavers, designs, wool, and finished textiles primarily between Oaxaca, Mexico and the American Southwest.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/3103017900?pwd=TURnd1E4Z0s3bUhFUW5oQkVzOThVZz09

Meeting ID: 310 301 7900
Passcode: 9516145
One tap mobile
+13017158592,,3103017900#,,,,,,0#,,9516145# US (Germantown)
+13126266799,,3103017900#,,,,,,0#,,9516145# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
+1 301 715 8592 US (Germantown)
+1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
+1 929 205 6099 US (New York)
+1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
+1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
+1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 310 301 7900
Passcode: 9516145
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kbUEqcWZ6f

Doctoral Student Laya Liebeseller and Professor Thomas Malaby’s Game Research Featured in UWM Report

Here in ‘Nerdwaukee,’ people love to play games

International Archaeology Day

Saturday, October 20 2018 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm

UWM Sabin Hall
3413 N. Downer Ave
Milwaukee, WI 53211

War, Peace, and the Feast: Conflict and Resolution in the Past

War, Peace, and the Feast is a hands-on opportunity to experience the variety of ways that conflicts were contested, resolved, and prevented in the past as revealed in the archaeological record. We present three main themes about ancient conflict. First is the variety of ways in which conflicts could be contested. These contests could indeed be bloody wars, but also could take the form of smaller-scale ritual battles like those which are seen today in Chiaraje, Peru. Myths also tell of sporting events taking place for warfare. Indeed, sports are well-known as a measure for pausing conflicts, as was the case in the ancient Olympics. We might infer that periodic sporting events both created social bonds between participants and released tensions before they could break into bloodshed. Finally, we present feasting as a key method in which social bonds were created as a means to provide stability and prevent conflict. With competitive feasting, we see the themes of War, Peace, and the Feast come full circle.

International Archaeology Day will be celebrated here in Milwaukee on Saturday October 20, 2018, from 1:00 to 4:00 pm on the UWM campus. Come to the first floor of UWM’s Sabin Hall (3413 N. Downer Ave.) and join us for an exciting afternoon doing archaeology with local specialists, ranging from experimental archaeology to helping identify and analyze ancient artifacts! FREE and open to the public. Fun for all ages!

This event is co-sponsored by the Archaeological Institute of America, Milwaukee Society and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Departments of Anthropology, Art History, and FLL Classics Program.

International Archaeology Day

Cheri Price awarded FLAS Fellowship to study Mixtec language

Cheri Price, archaeology PhD student, has been awarded a second Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies. She will continue studying Mixtec in Oaxaca, Mexico, this summer in preparation for her dissertation research… Read More

PhD candidate Jessica Skinner’s thesis project is featured on the Graduate School’s Research page

PhD candidate Jessica Skinner’s thesis project is featured on the Graduate School’s Research page. Earlier this spring Jessica competed in the first ever 3 Minute Thesis competition at UWM and took second place! Follow the link to the article in… Read More

Traci Billings (MS 2016) accepted into PhD program at the Max Planck Institute

Traci Billings (MS 2016) was accepted into a funded three-year PhD program at the Max Planck Institute in Jena, Germany, where she will be part of a team examining the use of psycho-active plants among the Steppe peoples in prehistory… Read More

UWM Dissertator Susan Hill Examines “Adulting” in New Edition of Anthropology News

  Susan Hill, a Doctoral Dissertator in the Department of Anthropology at the UW-Milwaukee writes in her new article, “#Adulting and the Disordered State of American Adulthood”, about the tough realities of coming of age in America in the new… Read More

Anthropologists contributing to new series at UWM Planetarium, “Indigenous Voices: Sharing the Wisconsin Sky.”

Associate Professor, Bernie Perley, and graduate student, Monea Warrington, participated in the first of a seven-part series featuring American Indian perspectives of the night sky. The series will take place every Friday from March 23 through May 4, at 7… Read More