Faculty News

Virtual Colloquium: A Retrospective: Twenty-Eight Years of the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery Project presented by Dr. Patricia B. Richards

Friday, October 9 2020 2:30 PM

This event will take place virtually via Zoom.

Come join us for our first-ever virtual colloquium presented by Dr. Patricia B. Richards on October 9th at 2:30 PM via Zoom!

A Retrospective: Twenty-Eight Years of the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery Project

From 1878 through 1974 Milwaukee County utilized four locations on the Milwaukee County Grounds in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin for the burial over 10,000 individuals, primarily paupers, the institutionalized, and the unidentified. Two archaeological excavations in 1991-1992 and again in 2013 resulted in the recovery of over 2,400 individuals from one of those cemetery locations. Curated by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s Archaeological Research Laboratory, the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery (MCPFC) individuals, artifacts, and associated archives represent one of the largest, if not the largest, archaeologically recovered, permanently curated skeletal collections in the United States. In addition to generating a substantial osteological data set, this project offers a model for crossing boundaries between cultural resource management, academic research, and social engagement at a time when the exhumation of the United States’ forgotten historic cemeteries has become increasingly common. As a project focused on a late 19th and early 20th century cemetery, the MCPFCP is situated not only within the history of historical archaeological research but is also influenced by the recent bioarchaeological trend of engaging with social theory to examine social identity and lived social experience. This talk summarizes the project to date within the overarching goal of returning a voice and an identity to individuals robbed of both by burial in the MCPFC.

Patricia Richards

Patricia Richards

Dr. Patricia B. Richards is a senior scientist in the Anthropology Department at UWM. She is also a Principal Investigator for UWM-CRM and has conducted cultural resource studies in Wisconsin, Michigan and Illinois since 1973. Her specialties include mortuary analysis and historic period archaeology in the Great Lakes region. She has served as project director of the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery Project since the collection was permanently moved to UWM in 2008 and directed the original excavations in 1990s.

How to Attend Meeting:

This meeting will take place virtually via the web conferencing app, Zoom. Please follow the instructions below to attend on the day and time of the colloquium. Thank you.

Join Zoom Meeting at 2:30 PM on October 9th.

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Meeting ID: 310 301 7900
Passcode: 9516145

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Museum Studies Program Receives Spotlight in Latest Issue of InFocus

Click on the link below to access the latest InFocus article featuring a story about UWM Anthropology’s relationship with the Milwaukee Public Museum.

Virtual Colloquium: “Hearst Ginda Verde: Following a Textile Pattern, Unraveling a Global Mimetic Meshwork” presented by Dr. W. Warner Wood

Friday, September 18 2020 - Friday, September 18 2020 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Zoom Meeting

Come join us for our first-ever virtual colloquium presented by Dr. W. Warner Wood on September 18th at 3:00 PM via Zoom!

“Hearst Ginda Verde: Following a Textile Pattern, Unraveling a Global Mimetic Meshwork” 

This talk traces a textile pattern’s appearance in blankets currently being sold through Pendleton Wool Mills as “Hearst Ginda Verde.” Wood unravels the meandering story of this pattern from its origins in the late 1800s, to its reproduction by the business Santa Fe Interiors in the 1990s, and on to its more recent sale through Pendleton. The name of the pattern used in Pendleton marketing points to the well-known Navajo textile collection of William Randolph Hearst. Approaching the pattern ethnographically affords an exploration of the ways that indigenous weavers and others become entangled in global articulations and practices. Unraveling the story of the production, marketing, and sale of several textiles featuring this pattern points toward what Michael Taussig and Homi Bhabha have characterized as the disruptive capacities of mimetic practices and products and toward an emergent global mimetic “meshwork” of weavers, dealers, and consumers.

This talk is cosponsored with the UWM Center for 21st Century Studies

Bill Wood is an associate professor in Anthropology at UWM. He was a C21 Faculty Fellow for the 2019-20 academic year. His research is focused on the cultural politics of heritage in global context. He is the author of Made in Mexico: Zapotec Weavers and the Global Ethnic Art Market (Indiana U. Press, 2008), an ethnographic account that follows weavers, designs, wool, and finished textiles primarily between Oaxaca, Mexico and the American Southwest.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/3103017900?pwd=TURnd1E4Z0s3bUhFUW5oQkVzOThVZz09

Meeting ID: 310 301 7900
Passcode: 9516145
One tap mobile
+13017158592,,3103017900#,,,,,,0#,,9516145# US (Germantown)
+13126266799,,3103017900#,,,,,,0#,,9516145# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
+1 301 715 8592 US (Germantown)
+1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
+1 929 205 6099 US (New York)
+1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
+1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
+1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 310 301 7900
Passcode: 9516145
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kbUEqcWZ6f

Dr. Perley interviewed by the Oberlin Review

Dr. Perley recently visited Oberlin College in Ohio and was interviewed by the school paper. Follow the link below to the interview: Dr. Bernard C. Perley, Cartoonist and Anthropologist

Lake Effect’s Joy Powers chats with Thomas Malaby about the history of role-playing games and what they say about our society.

Follow the link below to listen to the interview! Dungeons & Dragons’ Wisconsin Roots & The Evolution Of Role-Playing Games

Doctoral Student Laya Liebeseller and Professor Thomas Malaby’s Game Research Featured in UWM Report

Here in ‘Nerdwaukee,’ people love to play games

Professor Bettina Arnold and PhD candidate Josh Driscoll presented papers at the Premodern Food Conference

Professor Bettina Arnold and PhD candidate Josh Driscoll presented papers at the Premodern Food Conference in Minneapolis, October 17-19 Follow the link below for more information about the conference and their research! Premodern Food Cultures Conference

Professor Robert Jeske Receives Distinguished Career Award

Congratulations to Bob Jeske for receiving this year’s Distinguished Career Award from the Midwest Archaeological Conference! Bob has spent several decades working to shed light on complex archaeological problems in the Midwest. Bob Jeske (left) with MAC President John Doershuk… Read More

Dr. Trudy Turner to be next editor of the American Journal of Physical Anthropology

The AAPA Executive Committee and Paul-André Genest, Senior Editor at Wiley Publishers, are pleased to announce that Trudy Turner will become the next editor of the American Journal of Physical Anthropology effective April 1, 2019. We would like to congratulate Trudy as… Read More

Professor Bettina Arnold and PhD Candidate Josh Driscoll participate in Ancient Beer Workshop in Germany

Anthropology Professor Bettina Arnold and PhD candidate Josh Driscoll were invited speakers at the University of Hohenheim in Germany in the European Research Council PLANTCULT Workshop “Ancient Beer: Multidisciplinary Approaches to Identification in the Archaeological Record”, February 7-9, 2019. Their talks were entitled, respectively, Tapping into the Past:… Read More