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Virtual Craft Talk and Reading with Omar El-Akkad

Please join us on Tuesday, October 27 at 7:00 p.m. (CST) for a virtual event with award-winning Egyptian-Canadian author and international war correspondent Omar El Akkad, for a reading and craft lecture, “Lies of Our Own Making: The Obligations of Literature in a Politically Fractured Age,” followed by a Q&A session/conversation. This event is hosted by Plan C with the support of the Boudreaux Foundation.
To register for access to this event, please click here. This event is free and open to the public. 

El Akkad has reported on the NATO-led war in Afghanistan, the military trials in Guantanamo Bay, the Arab Spring revolution in Egypt, and the Black Lives Matter movement in Ferguson, Missouri. El Akkad’s latest book is the critically acclaimed best-selling novel, American War. 

United We Read: Cassandra J. Bruner, Jessica Drake-Thomas, John Thurgood, and Mauricio Kilwein Guevara

Plan-C logo

Friday, October 9th, 7:00 pm via Zoom United We Read is Plan C’s student-faculty reading series and is a wonderful opportunity to get to know people’s work and hear about their writing projects! This year we are fully online and the October 9th edition features … Read More

Virtual Talk & Discussion with Dr. April Baker-Bell

Wednesday, Oct 21st at 3:00 pm Dr. April Baker-Bell (author of Linguistic Justice: Black Language, Literacy, Identity, and Pedagogy) will discuss her book, focusing on how anti-Black linguistic racism and white linguistic supremacy get normalized in teacher attitudes, curriculum, and instruction, pedagogical… Read More

English Department Statement of Solidarity with Racial Justice Protests

Dear English Majors, Minors, and Graduate Students, The events across the country and here in our city have spurred us, your teachers, to take a stand with you. We, the undersigned members of the Department of English, unequivocally, fully, and… Read More

*Canceled* 03/27/2020 – Subject/Abject Relations by Celine Parreñas Shimizu

March 27th, 2020 at 3:30 PM – 5 PM
UWM Campus, Curtin Hall 368

“The World in South Asia” lecture series welcomes Celine Parreñas Shimizu (School of Cinema, San Francisco State University).

Different proximities to social life—viability (regard and recognition) and death (disregard and abuse) can measure inequality between intimately enmeshed subjects in and out of representation. In our witnessing on-screen relations featuring the denigration endured by the abjected, we as the audience are exposed as both conceptualized and located in our difference.

In our encounter with films from countries and regions touched by colonial relations, our spectatorship is implicated by the film. From the perches we occupy, we watch these films from positions of distance—-whether geographic or social—even as audiences in the West are diasporic subjects from elsewhere.

These films may lead us to feelings of empathy or hopefully, an awareness of our power to name and define whom we see: as subject, other, object or abject—in how we accept the ability of film to show us ourselves and our limits in recognizing and feeling for others.

Sponsored by the Vilas Trust and the Film Studies program.

Free and open to the public.

02/06/2020 – United We Read: Cho, Correale, Maddox, Callanan

Thursday, February 6 at 7:30 PM

Boswell Books
2559 N Downer Ave

United We Read is the Graduate Creative Writing Program’s student-faculty reading series that takes place in venues throughout the community.

This edition takes place at Boswell Books and features readings by Su Cho, Anthony Correale, Lauren Maddox, and Liam Callanan.

Free and open to the public.

11/07/2019 – United We Read: Denny, Henry, Roy, and Dunham

Thursday 11/07/2019 @7:30pm
Woodland Pattern Book Center
720 E. Locust Street
Milwaukee, WI 53212

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

United We Read is the Graduate Creative Writing Program’s student-faculty reading series that takes place in venues throughout the community.

This edition takes place at Woodland Pattern and features readings by Sasheene Denny, Brandon Henry, Jessie Roy, and Rebecca Dunham.

10/17/2019 – Poetry Reading: Derrick Harriell

Thursday, October 17, 2019 @7:30pm – 10:30pm

Hefter Center 3271 North Lake Drive

Please join us in celebrating 50 years of Creative Writing at UWM with a reading by poet and essayist Derrick Harriell.

Derrick Harriell resides in Oxford MS and teaches in the English and African American Studies programs at the University of Mississippi where he also directs the Master of Fine Arts in creative writing program. His poem collections are Cotton (Aquarius Press- Willow Books 2010), Ropes (Aquarius Press- Willow Books 2013- winner of the 2014 Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters Poetry Book Award), and Stripper in Wonderland (LSU Press 2017). His poems and essays have been published widely.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

10/16/2019 – 10 x 5: Celebration and Alumni Reading

Wednesday, October 16, 2019 @7:30 pm

Greene Hall 148

UWM Creative Writing Program’s 50th Anniversary Celebration

Featuring recollections from 50 years of our graduate Creative Writing Program and a showcase of 10 alumni reading for 5 minutes each, mixed with lots of reconnecting, friendship and, of course, cake!

 

Featuring readings by…

Camille Banks (Richard J. Daley College, Chicago)

Debra Brenegan (Mount Mary University)

Peter Burzynski (Woodland Pattern Book Center)

Christi Clancy

Lindsay Daigle (UWM Honors College)

Chris Fink (Beloit College)

Janet Jennerjohn (Milwaukee Area Technical College)

Stephen McCabe (UW-Oshkosh)

Jozi Tatham (Siddhi Yoga)

Thomas Vollman (Milwaukee Area Technical School)

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

10/11/2019 – Professor Bhaskar Sarkar Lectures on “Cosmoplastics, or, Bollywood’s Global Gesture”

Friday, October 11 2019 @3:30 pm

Curtin Hall 368

“The World in South Asia” lecture series welcomes Professor Bhaskar Sarkar (UC-Santa Barbara) who will deliver the talk entitled “Cosmoplastics, or, Bollywood’s Global Gesture”

Indian cinema, more specifically the Bombay-based Hindi cinema industry, is now widely referred to as Bollywood. What work has this portmanteau term been doing as the industry has “gone global”? Drawing on salient aspects of Bombay cinema’s industrial reorganization and aesthetic modulations, this talk will seek to develop a theory of cosmoplastics as the art of forging worlds from shifting relations and local perspectives. At stake is 1) an understanding of the political domain that is shaped by the sheer plasticity of cinema, and 2) the recognition of “the global” as always locally grounded, always multiple.

This talk is sponsored by the Villas Trust and the Film Studies program.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.