Exhibitions and Lectures

Art Exposé Gallery Talk – April 9, 2024

Art Expose Spring 2024

The Art Exposé are 15-minute presentations in which Gallery Staff, Faculty, or Gallery Interns discuss a mystery art object in the gallery collection. This is a wonderful opportunity to see the results of object-based learning and support our gallery team. Plus, you may see something new and exciting you never knew we had!

Tuesday April 9th – Morgan Moore, Mathis Gallery Graduate Curatorial Intern will present at 1pm in the Mathis Gallery.

Saintly: Christian Women in Early Modern Europe

Thursday, April 11 2024 - Thursday, May 9 2024

Emile H. Mathis Art Gallery

Saintly: Christian Women in Early Modern Europe, showcases our unique opportunity for students to complete a Master’s Thesis in the form of an exhibition. Saintly explores the relationship between laywomen and holy women from the Christian canon by examining depictions of the Virgin Mary and Women Saints in works from the 16th through 18th centuries. Curated by graduate student Nikki Ranney, this thesis exhibition brings perspective to the religious lives of women during this period and the expectations to which they were subjected.

April 11 through May 9, 2024

Opening Reception: April 11th from 5 to 7pm with curator remarks at 5:30pm

UWM Emile H. Mathis Gallery
Mitchell Hall 170
3203 N. Downer Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53211

What the Folk? American Objects from the UWM Art Collection

Thursday, April 11 2024 - Thursday, May 9 2024

Emile H. Mathis Art Gallery

Accompanying a course on American Folk Art taught by the UWM Art History Department, What the Folk? explores the terminology and history that have shaped understandings of folk art, self-taught art, Americana, outsider art, and visionary art. It asks which artists and objects are included in such categories, why people have invested in the concept of folk art, and how we can uncover the stories of American artists whose work deserves greater attention, no matter what it is called.

Co-curated by Dr. Kay Wells and Leigh Mahlik

April 11 through May 9, 2024

Opening Reception: April 11th from 5 to 7pm with curator remarks at 5:30pm

UWM Emile H. Mathis Gallery
Mitchell Hall 170
3203 N. Downer Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53211

Robo-Buddhism: Kokoro, Technology, and Spirituality in Japan Today

Wednesday, April 10 2024 4pm

Lubar S151

Public lecture by Dr. Jennifer Robertston, Professor emerita, Departments of Anthropology and Art History, Michigan State University

Kokoro (心) is widely and innovatively used in everyday parlance and figures in many Japanese idioms. Kokoro connotes intellectual, emotional, and spiritual states and attributes. Kokoro is also a key lexeme in Japan’s two main religions: the animistic native Shintō and Buddhism. In August 2017, SoftBank’s humanoid robot Pepper role-played as a Buddhist priest at a funeral services expo under the supervision of a human priest who assessed whether the robot was able perform “with kokoro.” When theorizing human-robot interactions, roboticists also include kokoro as a crucial quality and effect of social engagement. Kokoro figures centrally in the titles of several Japanese books on robots and AI. Several cognitive roboticists are working to “imagineer” (imagine + engineer) robot kokoro through innovative software algorithms and creative interpretations of AI. Pepper was conceived as a humanoid robot “with kokoro.” Technology and robots have been developed and applied for both secular and religious purposes, although the appropriation of robotic technologies and AI for religious purposes is perhaps less recognized than their secular applications. This presentation explores how religious technologies and affective human-robot relations are conjointly imagineered theoretically and in practice.