Past Events

  • Searching for the Royal Inca Mummies- Sunday, February 17, 2019, 3:00 pm
    Sabin Hall G90

    Visit the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) lecture with Professor Brian Bauer. Bauer's lecture is entitled “Searching for the Royal Inca Mummies.” Bauer is an archaeologist focused on the development of complex societies in the Americas and the European—American contact period and is a Professor of Anthropology at the University of Illinois - Chicago.
  • King Richard III: The Resolution of a 500 year old Cold Case- Sunday, March 31, 2019, 3:00 pm
    Engelman Hall, Room 105

    Visit the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) lecture with Professor Turi King. King's lecture is entitled “King Richard III: The Resolution of a 500 Year Old Cold Case.” King is the Director of the Forensic and Ancient Biomolecules (FAB) Group at the University of Leicester, England. She is also a Professor of Public Engagement and Reader in Genetics and Archaeology at the University of Leicester.
  • A Tale of Two Villages: Comparing Community Histories in Siin (Senegal) into the Atlantic Era- Sunday, April 27, 2019, 3:00 pm
    Sabin Hall G90

    Visit the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) lecture with Associate Professor François Richard. Richard's lecture is entitled “A Tale of Two Villages: Comparing Community Histories in Siin (Sengal) into the Atlantic Era.” François Richard is a historical anthropologist and archaeologist interested in material histories of French colonialism and imperialism and an Associate Professor of Anthroplogy and Social Sciences in the College at University of Chicago.
  • Bodily Pathology and Unhealthy Politics in Alcaeus- Thursday, October 18, 2018, 3:00 pm
    Curtin Hall Room 866

    Join us for the WAMS (Workshop on Ancient Mediterranean Studies) Talk with Professor Ippokratis Kantzios from the University of South Florida. Kantzios will be presenting "Bodily Pathology and Unhealthy Politics in Alcaeus."
  • 1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed- Sunday, November 4, 2018, 3:00 pm
    Sabin Hall G90

    Come listen to Professor Eric Cline's talk entitled "1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed." Eric Cline is Professor of Classics, Anthropology, and History at George Washington University.
  • Kingship and Compassion: The Paradox of Jayavarman VII, Emperor of Angkor- Sunday, December 2, 2018, 3:00 pm
    Sabin Hall G90

    Come listen to Alan Kolata talk about Kingship and Compassion: The Paradox of Jayavarman VII, Emperor of Angkor. Alan Kolata is a Distinguished Professor at the University of Chicago and holds his PhD in Anthropology from Harvard University.
  • AIA Talk: The Middle Mississippian Colony at Trempealeau- Sunday, September 30, 2018, 3:00 pm
    Sabin Hall Room G90

    Come to the AIA Talk on The Middle Mississippian Colony at Trempealeau by Ernie Boszhardt. Boszhardt-authored books on the Trempealeau research and regional rock art will be available for purchase and signing at the talk.
  • Male and Female Initiatory Paradigms and the Ending of Sophocles’ Electra- Thursday, September 20, 2018, 4:00 pm
    Curtin Hall Room 866
    Join us for the WAMS talk presented by Dr. Adriana Brook, Assistant Professor of Classics at Lawrence University. She will be discussing Male and Female Initiatory Paradigms and the Ending of Sophocles' Electra.
  • Mythbusting the Ancient Theater- Thursday, May 10, 2018, 4:00 pm
    Curtin Hall Room 866

    It is often asserted that the Greek theater was in decline in the postclassical period. This model assumes that Roman cultural influence drive drama off the stages of the Greek world, while pantomime (a silent, masked dance) "replaced" spoken drama. This paradigm of the trajectory of the ancient theater was developed in the early modern period, and continues to exert a surprising level of influence today. In this talk, Dr. Skotheim will "bust" this myth about the ancient theater history, and showing how consideration of the material evidence can change our perspective on the role of drama in postclassical Greek and Roman society.
  • The Cosmic Significance of Wealth Acquisition in Ancient Greece: the Athenian General Nicias as a Case Study- Since Moses Finley, scholars studying the ancient economy have largely abandoned the search for cultural particularism in ancient economic mentality and behavior, and have moved instead to a New Institutional Economics approach, which is heavily grounded in modern social science theory and economic models. But while the search for what was unique about ancient mentalité has been largely left behind, a growing chorus of increasingly vocal critics is stressing the need for culturally specific models of behavior, as has been convincingly demonstrated by anthropologists. In this workshop Dr. Leese will explore the economic, political, and religious behavior of Nicias, the famous Athenian general of the Sicilian Expedition and argue that Nicias’ behavior shows how difficult it is to identify what was culturally specific about ancient Greek economic mentalité.
  • Fitting Archaeology into a Multidisciplinary Grand Challenge Program: “Planet Texas 2050”- Professor Rabinowitz studies Greek colonization, cultural interaction, ancient food and drink, archaeology of daily life, and digital approaches to archaeology. He has also several digital humanities projects about the Classical past funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.
  • Assumption of Risk in Athenian Law- Dr. Phillips is a specialist in ancient Athenian law, and his recent publications include a reassessment of the legal definition of hubris in his contribution to The Topography of Violence, edited by Werner Riess and Garrett G. Fagan, and a discussion of the legal ramifications of pollution brought on by homicide in the proceedings from a conference on Greek and Hellenistic legal history in Portugal in 2015. In this seminar, he will be telling us about his recent work on “Assumption of Risk in Athenian Law,”which has just been published.
  • What’s the “Difference”?- Dr. Muse will be speaking to us about Callias (III),a notorious figure in fifth-century Athens, who inherited from his father Hipponicus (II) the largest fortune in Greece and allegedly squandered nearly all of it. A patron of the itinerant intellectuals known as sophists, upon whom he lavished great sums of money, Callias appears as a salient exemplum in the dialogues of Plato and Xenophon in debates about two of the most important topics of their day and ours: education and wealth.
  • Commemoration, Conflict, and the Classical Tradition: The Confederate Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery- In 1910 the United Daughters of the Confederacy commissioned sculptor Moses Jacob Ezekiel to design and execute a monument memorializing Confederate soldiers who died in the Civil War. In this workshop, Dr. Wickkiser will survey the design that Ezekiel chose, which includes classicizing elements; the location of the monument within a highly contested landscape of memory; and the life of Ezekiel himself, a Jew who fought for the Confederacy and remained throughout his life a passionate advocate for religious freedom.
  • Stonehenge: New Discoveries- Michael Parker Pearson, University College London
    Sunday, April 17, 2016, 3:00 pm
    Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America
  • The Urban Revolution on Aphrodite’s Isle: Searching for Cyprus’s Late Bronze Age Cities- Kevin Fisher, University of British Columbia
    Sunday, March 6, 2016, 3:00 pm
    Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America
  • Chronology, Exchange, and Technology: New Insight on Intercultural Interaction in the Upper Great Lakes- Heather Walder, UW-La Crosse
    Sunday, January 31, 2016, 3:00 pm
    Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America
  • Warfare, Weapons, and Skeletal Trauma in Early Medieval Ireland- Rachel Scott, Anthropology, DePaul University
    Sunday, December 6, 2015, 3:00 pm
    Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America
  • Reading Augustan Rome- Dr. Nandini Pandey, Assistant Professor of Classics, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Friday, November 13, 2015, 3:30 pm
    UWM Curtain Hall 939
  • The Rising Star Expedition and the Discovery of Homo naledi- John Hawks, Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Sunday, November 1, 2015, 3:00 pm
    Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America
  • International Archaeology Day- International Archaeology Day Celebration
    Saturday, October 17, 2015, 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    See International Archaeology Day for details.
  • The Archaeology of Ancient Greek Dress- Mireille M. Lee, Vanderbilt University
    Monday, September 28, 2015, 3:00 pm
    Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America
  • The Heuneburg Agglomeration and the Earliest Urbanization North of the Alps (600-400 BC)- Dr. Manuel Fernández-Götz, Chancellor's Fellow in Archaeology, Edinburgh University, completed his binational PhD in pre- and protohistoric archaeology at the Christian-Albrechts-Universitsät Kiel (Germany) and the Complutense University of Madrid (Spain) in 2011. His research focuses on the evolution of Iron Age communities in Western Europe, especially questions of social identity.
  • The Ptolemies, the Alexandria and Rosetta Decrees, and Translocal Cosmopolitanism- This talk will engage with two interconnected questions. First, Dr. Fischer-Bovet will argue that the successors of Alexander the Great in Egypt, the Macedonian dynasty of the Ptolemies (323-30 BC), had imperial goals and actively built an empire, although scholarly tendency has been to consider their kingdom essentially an Egyptian national state. Second, she will turn to the role of the local elites in the imperial project.
  • The Green Fear of Death: Flowers, Fertility and Monstrousness in Homeric Poetry- Dr. William Brockliss, Assistant Professor of Classics, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Friday, February 27, 2015, 3:30 pm
    UWM Curtin Hall 939
  • A Great Imperial Sanctuary in Germania Superior: The Exemple of Mandeure- Dr. Marc will be speaking on “A Great Imperial Sanctuary in Germania Superior: The Exemple of Mandeure.” His work at this site has contributed to there-evaluation of the phenomenon of “Romanization” in light of scientific advances in archaeology over the past 50 years and a more nuanced consideration of historical context in Roman province of Germania.
  • Dr. Hrvoje Potrebica- Dr. Potrebica will be speaking about the Kapitol site in Croatia as a nexus of Mediterranean cultures where artifacts of both Etruscan and Greek origin are found in funerary contexts during the Early Iron Age.
  • Creon and Other Stock Tyrants in Greek Tragedy- Dr. Duncan's talk will be focused on the character of Creon during and after the Peloponnesian War and tyrants' use of theater to legitimize their regimes.
  • At the Horse and Girl: Sex, Death, and Revolution in Archaic Athens- Dr. Wallace will be speaking on the abolishment of monarchy at Athens.
  • The Children of the Athenian Phratries- Kent Rigsby is Professor Emeritus from Duke University, where he was a professor of Ancient History and Epigraphy. He received his BA in Classics from Yale, before receiving his MA from the University of Toronto. In 1971, he was a fellow at the Society of Fellows at Harvard University. He is the author of Asylia: Territorial Inviolability in the Hellenistic World (1996), and has published dozens of articles on Greek law, epigraphy, and numismatics. He is currently the editor of the journal Greek, Roman & Byzantine Studies.
  • Regulating Religion: The Challenges and Potential of Greek Sacred Laws- Chad Austino received his PhD in classics from Duke University in 2012 and has a BA in History and Classics from Rutgers University. His dissertation was titled "Adaptation and Tradition in Hellenistic Sacred Laws." He currently teaches Latin at Catholic Memorial High School in Waukesha, WI.