UWM Budget Impact Advocacy Facts

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Student Success

The proposed 2015-17 budget for Wisconsin disinvests in our students.

UWM is the State’s second largest public university and is vital to the region. We educate more Wisconsin residents than any institution – 28,000+ students currently. UWM enrolls more transfer students than any other institution in the State and educates more veteran students than any institution within a six-state region.

We provide all UWM graduates with lifelong critical thinking, oral and written communication, quantitative literacy, and complex problem-solving abilities.

UWM produces thousands of graduates each year – 5,609 in 2014. Nearly three-quarters (74%) of our 160,000 alumni remain in Wisconsin, which is especially critical as the State will have 100,000 new jobs to fill by 2023, with 41% requiring at least a college degree.

More than 200 product ideas have come through UWM’s Student Startup Challenge and 18 student/alumni businesses started from UWM programs.

Budget cuts to UWM cause exponential harm to the students and families of Southeastern Wisconsin because UWM is the most influential public higher education presence in the region.

I encourage you to contact State legislators to ask them to reduce the proposed cut to the UW System budget, while granting more flexibility so that we can do our jobs more efficiently and provide the region with needed college graduates.

Research

The proposed 2015-17 budget for Wisconsin disinvests in UWM’s engaged research efforts. UWM is the only urban, public research university in the State.

Engaged research universities like UWM – and particularly because we collaborate – are critical for two reasons: we serve as the ‘idea factories’ of potential new inventions, new ideas, and new thought leadership. We also prepare the entrepreneurs as well as the skilled workforce that competitive, high-tech businesses need.

UWM has $59 million in annual research expenditures. Nearly 200 issued patents and patent applications have resulted from UWM’s research in the last nine years. Add to that, 21 intellectual property licenses.

Budget cuts to UWM cause exponential harm to the region’s potential to be innovators and to solve some of the most profound – and most practical – questions of the modern day. This, in turn, significantly and adversely harm UWM’s ability to contribute to regional state growth.

I encourage you to contact State legislators to ask them to reduce the proposed cut to the UW System budget, while granting more flexibility so that we can do our jobs more efficiently and retain UWM’s reputation for excellence in engaged research.

Engagement and Partnerships

The proposed 2015-17 budget for Wisconsin disinvests in UWM’s ability to deeply engage in our communities and build partnerships that matter.

UWM has hundreds of partnerships with corporations, social service providers, healthcare providers, public and private schools, and colleges and universities, each year, including nursing faculty and students who provide care in 180 locations and student teachers/supervisors who are in more than 170 schools in the region. We offer over 300 live theatre, music, dance, and other performance events each year, enriching the lives of thousands.

Our students volunteer more than 43,000 hours every year at more than 125 organizations. UWM students are active in hundreds of internships in business, engineering, architecture, social sciences and more. These internships lead to jobs for our students and fulfill emerging needs of area businesses and organizations.

The proposed state budget at its current level of cuts will significantly and adversely harm UWM’s ability to contribute to regional state growth.

I encourage you to contact State legislators to ask them to reduce the proposed cut to the UW System budget, while granting more flexibility so that we can do our jobs more efficiently, and maintain the rich partnerships that have changed thousands of lives.

Talent, Culture and Climate

The proposed 2015-17 budget for Wisconsin disinvests in UWM’s ability to attract and retain talent. States with prosperous economies, higher per-capita income, and healthy communities most often are those that have made prior investments in education and the workforce.

UWM is a major economic force in Wisconsin, employing more than 5,000 people and producing more than 5,600 college graduates each year. UWM employees spend $143 million in Wisconsin annually. Visitors to UWM, its students, and athletic events add $140 million to the Wisconsin economy each year. All told, the expenditures of UWM, its employees, students and visitors total about $713 million annually and result in almost 29,400 jobs (not including UWM jobs).

UWM plays a critical role in providing talent and intellectual capabilities to the region, including the hundreds of alumni on our own campus.

I encourage you to contact State legislators to ask them to reduce the proposed cut to the UW System budget, while granting more flexibility to operate more efficiently, and preserving tenure and shared governance, which are essential to recruiting talent and increasing UWM’s ability to compete in the marketplace.


 

Increasing UWM’s Visibility

The proposed 2015-17 budget for Wisconsin disinvests in UWM’s ability to increase its visibility and to compete in the higher education marketplace.

We are home to several only-at-UWM academic programs including the School of Freshwater Sciences, the Peck School of the Arts, and the School of Architecture and Urban Planning. UWM is the only university in the state to offer a bachelor’s degree in American Sign Language. We have nationally-ranked programs in Business, Film, Information Studies, Occupational Therapy, and Physical Therapy, just to name some. UWM is also nationally recognized as a leader in online education, and is the recipient of many national awards in this area, including the Online Teaching Consortium’s 2014 Excellence in Online Teaching Award. These are just a few examples of the prestigious programs and opportunities that UWM provides and that prospective students and their families need to know about.

Over many years, UWM has established an international reputation for excellence in research, community engagement, teaching, and entrepreneurism. The proposed state budget at its current level of cuts will significantly and adversely erode UWM’s ability to strengthen its brand, and to effectively compete.

I encourage you to contact State legislators to ask them to reduce the proposed cut to the UW System budget, while granting more flexibility so that we can do our jobs more efficiently and attract and retain future generations of students.

 

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