profile-default

Erin Sahlstein Parcell

Associate Professor
 (414) 229-3127
 Johnston Hall 226

Education

PhD, Communication Studies, University of Iowa
MA, Communication, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
BA, Speech Communication, Iowa State University

Research Interests

My research currently centers on communication within and about military families. Emerging from my interests in long-distance communication, I have studied military family communication across deployment (pre, during, and post), and recently started a project focusing on LGBT+ service members’ and spouses’ experiences within the military pre- and post- Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell and the repeal of the Defense of Marriage Act. I primarily employ qualitative methods for my research (e.g., in-depth interviews) but have participated in several meta-analyses and survey design studies. I encourage students, both graduate and undergraduate, to contact me if they are interested in joining my research. My future projects will continue addressing military family topics as well as other long-distance relationships. I am also interested in studying parenting, specifically disciplining children and why parents choose to use certain tactics over others.

Courses Taught

Graduate:
Marital and Family Communication
Conflict Management
Qualitative Methods
Long-distance communication

Undergraduate:
Issues in Interpersonal Communication
Long-distance Communication
Marital and Family Communication
Conflict Management
Research Methods

Selected Publications

Sahlstein Parcell, E. M. (2015, July (3rd Quarter/Summer)). Research at the intersections of military and communication: A preview and review. A communication perspective on the military: Interactions, messages, and discourses. New York, NY: Peter Lang.
Sahlstein Parcell, E. M., & Webb, L. M. (2015, July (3rd Quarter/Summer)). A communication perspective on the military: Interactions, messages, and discourses. New York, NY: Peter Lang.
Sahlstein Parcell, E. M. (2014, January (1st Quarter/Winter)). Domain and taxonomic analysis as a way to analyze qualitative data: Using Spradley’s semantic relationships as a means for studying long-distance friendship. Manning, J., & Kunkel, A. (Eds.). Qualitative studies of interpersonal communication: Method, context, and analysis, 106-110. Los Angeles, CA: ). Los Angeles, CA: Sage.
Sahlstein Parcell, E. M., & Maguire, K. C. (2014, February). Comfort, cliques, and clashes: Family readiness groups as dilemmatic sites of relating during wartime. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 31, 497-515.
Sahlstein Parcell, E. M., & Maguire, K. C. (2014). Turning points and trajectories of military deployment. Journal of Family Communication, 14(2), 129-148.
Sahlstein Parcell, E. M. (2013, July (3rd Quarter/Summer)). Trajectories Research in Family Communication: Toward the Identification of Alternative Pathways for Inquiry. Journal of Family Communication, 13(3), 167-177.
Sahlstein Parcell, E. M., & Maguire, K. C. (2013, October (4th Quarter/Autumn)). Family relationships as more than blood: Military families as dialectics and discourses. Marrow, S. R., Leoutsakas, D. A., & (Eds.). More than blood: Today’s reality and tomorrow’s vision of family, 174-182. Dubuque, IA: Kendall-Hunt.
Mcguaire, K. C., Heinemann-LaFave, D., & Sahlstein Parcell, E. M. (2013). “To be so connected, yet not at all”: Relational presence, absence, and maintenance in the context of a wartime deployment. Western Journal of Communication, 77, 249-271.
Sahlstein Parcell, E. M., Maguire, K. C., & Timmerman, L. (2009). Contradictions and praxis contextualized by wartime deployment: Wives’ perspectives revealed through relational dialectics. Communication Monographs, 76, 421-442.