Reports

What predicts the college success of former MPS students?

As part of our evaluation of the MPS Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) grant, we analyze the connection between measures of high school performance, such as AP course participation, participation in GEAR UP programming, ACT scores, and GPA with first-year college GPA. Data were provided by the Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS), the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee (UWM), and Milwaukee Area Technical College (MATC) for students who graduated GEAR UP schools between 2015 and 2018 and then attended either UWM or MATC.

  • Although we did not find a connection between GEAR UP participation and college GPA, nearly all students who graduated high school and attended MATC or UWM had participated in several GEAR UP activities. This complicated our ability to measure impact and suggests GEAR UP programming was valued by nearly all students who ultimately went to college.
  • Measures of high school GPA were the only unique predictors of of college GPA.
  • Although students who participated in AP classes tended to have higher college GPAs, this relationship disappeared after accounting for high school GPA.
  • Although students with higher ACT scores tended to have higher college GPAs, this relationship also disappeared after accounting for high school GPA.

View full report here GU Post Secondary Prediction Study

Focus Group of former GEAR UP Students Supported by the Educational Opportunity Program at Marquette University

In June 2019, eight Marquette University undergraduate students of color were convened for a focus group at the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) in Coughlin Hall on the Marquette University campus. Students were asked to discuss their experiences in both programs and to make suggestions for how access to college and success in college could be supported more effectively for other MPS students like them.

MPS GEAR UP Final Report of Participation and High School Graduation

In this report, we summarize student participation in Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) grant across all seven years of the initiative in the Milwaukee Public Schools. 6,888 students participated in at least one GEAR UP activity. Over 90% of participants were either African American or Latinx and were from low-income families.

The improvement in graduation rates realized by specific GEAR UP schools was associated with how well they implemented the initiative. The two schools that demonstrated the greatest improvement in graduation rates, also demonstrated more intensive GEAR UP participation (students participated across more years and in more activities). This suggests that the impact of GEAR UP on high school graduation is locally determined by the effectiveness of a school’s implementation of the initiative.

Education in the time of COVID-19: Lessons from a school in Hong Kong

This report presents information gathered from one American international school in Hong Kong that began their transition to distance learning in February. As the COVID-19 pandemic continued to stress community and school resources, this school engaged in an internal continuous improvement and monitoring process. While its data collection activities were intended to inform internal decisions, the lessons learned from these efforts may be of use to other schools struggling through their own transition to distance learning while simultaneously dealing with the impact of a pandemic in their community. The hope is that this school’s experiences will provide educators in the United States guidance for how to accomplish and sustain this extremely difficult task.

Results

  • The school designed an effective distance learning process, using a variety of tools to facilitate learning.
  • As the school remained closed, over time students began to feel more socially isolated.
  • Teachers experienced a great deal of stress, both related to the workload required to implement distance learning and concerns about the safety of their families.
  • Ongoing and consistent communication throughout the transition has proven critical for its success and the well-being of employees. Parents, students, and employees have also appreciated opportunities to share their experiences with administration.
  • Teachers with children face a daunting task of both continuing their work as a teacher AND leading the home schooling of their children.
  • Most teachers felt their instructional skills have improved as a result of the switch to distance learning.

Research Brief: The Utility and Cost of Requiring Wisconsin Teachers Pass the FoRT and edTPA assessments

In this study, conducted by The Office of Socially Responsible Evaluation in Education at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee and the University of Wisconsin System, we explore the utility and impact of the requirement that preservice teachers meet a minimum score on the both the Educative Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) and the Wisconsin Foundations of Reading Test (FoRT).

 

View FoRT edTPA study presentation

 

WEERP Brief Nov 2019 – Race, Relational Trust, and Teacher Retention

In this report we explore relational trust as a possible explanation for: 1) why most Wisconsin schools do not have have any teachers of color and 2) the schools with the most students of color have the most difficulty retaining teachers.

We found African American teachers have lower trust with other teachers and are considerably more likely to transfer or leave public education than White teachers. This contributes to the shortage of African American teachers in schools across the state.

We also found White teachers reported less trust with African American or Latinx principals and between teachers, when fewer teachers were White. White teachers were more likely to transfer out of these types of schools, which generally have more students of color. This helps explain the teacher retention challenges experienced in schools comprised almost entirely of students of color.

 

DPI Cabinet Presentation

 

Interview with Katharine Rainey and Curtis Jones on NPRs Lake Effect

 

Covered by Spectrum News 1

The Impact of the Wisconsin Educator Effectiveness Process on New Teacher Turnover

In this report, we found the effective implementation of the teacher performance feedback process promotes the retention of new teachers. Providing new teachers accurate performance feedback led to improved trust with their principal, more school commitment and greater retention.

 

View DPI Cabinet Presentation

WEERP – Wisconsin Urban Leadership Institute Brief – September 2019

The five largest school districts began working with the Urban League of Greater Madison and the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction three years ago to develop strategies for promoting equitable education opportunities for students of color. Their efforts resulted in the Wisconsin Urban Leadership Institute. This report presents the results from the first year of this important initiative.

 

Wisconsin-Urban-Leadership-Institute-Slide-Deck-September-2019

The Impact of the Wisconsin Educator Effectiveness Process on Student Achievement

In this report, we found schools that improved aspects of the teacher performance feedback process also demonstrated improved student achievement results. Schools that increased the opportunities teachers have to use feedback and the amount that teachers used feedback improved their reading and math achievement results.

 

View DPI Cabinet Presentation

The Associations between How Schools use the Results of Teacher Evaluations, Principal Preparedness for Completing Teacher Evaluations, and Principal Perceptions of the Process

This report presents the results of a statewide survey of Wisconsin school administrators about their role in the evaluation of teachers.

SREed Brief July 2018 – EE and Job Satisfaction for Novice Teachers

In this brief we examine novice teacher perceptions of their principal and their job and a function of the implementation of their school’s Educator Effectiveness Process.

How are District Differences in the Implementation of Teacher Evaluations associated with Teacher Perceptions of School Leadership and Teacher Job Satisfaction?

We report on the results of a statewide survey of 24,000 teachers—44% of all Wisconsin classroom teachers—about their experiences with teacher evaluations and the feedback process, perceptions of principal effectiveness, and their satisfaction with their job. The results demonstrate a close connection between how school districts implement teacher evaluations and the perceptions of their teachers across a number of school social factors, including the usefulness of performance feedback, principal effectiveness and job satisfaction. Teachers in districts that provide adequate time and support to teachers to complete their evaluation process, along with useful and accurate performance feedback, perceive their principals to be effective leaders and are more satisfied with their job.

 

2019 Association for Education Finance & Policy Presentation in Fort Worth Texas

Measuring the Effectiveness of Wisconsin Principals: A Study of Wisconsin Framework for Principal Leadership Ratings

This study uses the results of teacher surveys to validate effectiveness ratings assigned to principals as part of the Wisconsin Educator Effectiveness (EE) process. These results suggest ratings reflect important aspects of principal effectiveness and leadership as experienced by teachers and that DPI has developed a process for measuring school leadership that accurately captures the experiences of educators in schools.

 

2018 Presentation at the annual meeting of the Association of Education Finance and Policy in Portland OR

Measuring the Principal Effectiveness Equity Gap within Wisconsin School Districts

In this study, we explore the extent that effective principals are equitably distributed across Wisconsin. Within school districts, low-income and diverse schools disproportionally face challenges attracting and retaining effective principals. This results in less effective leadership in these schools. Any efforts to address equity gaps in access to effective teachers must also address equity gaps in access to effective principals. The effectiveness of teachers in diverse and low-income schools is largely determined by the effectiveness of leadership.

 

2018 Presentation at the annual meeting of the Association of Education Finance and Policy in Portland OR

Exploring the Perspectives of Milwaukee Opportunity Youth through Photovoice

SREed worked in partnership with the Westlawn Re-engagement Center to conduct a Photovoice evaluation that engaged the voices of Milwaukee Opportunity Youth, young adults ages 16 to 24 who are disconnected from school and work, in developing and refining a pilot program to meet their needs.

Predicting AP Success in the Milwaukee Public Schools

SREed has been working with the Milwaukee Public Schools for a number of years to promote more equitable participation in advanced placement courses. As part of this work, this report summarizes the results of predictive analytics used to identify students with the potential to succeed in AP but who are not participating.

 

2017 paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Public Policy and Management Chicago IL

 

2017 presentation at the annual meeting of the Association for Public Policy and Management Chicago IL

Spark i3 Evaluation Study 2

The results of a two-year randomized control trial evaluation of the SPARK literacy model in the Milwaukee Public Schools, funded by an Investing in Innovations (i3) grant, found that it had a positive impact on student literacy, achievement and school attendance.

 

2016 presentation at the annual meeting of the Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness Washington DC

 

2017 presentation at the annual AMERICORPS State and National Symposium

 

2018 presentation at the annual meeting of the Association for Public Policy and Management Washington DC

SPARK i3 Evaluation Study

The results of a two-year randomized control trial evaluation of the SPARK literacy model in the Milwaukee Public Schools, funded by an Investing in Innovations (i3) grant, found that it had a positive impact on reading achievement.

 

2015 presentation at the annual meeting of the Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness Washington DC