Compton Tortoiseshell Butterfly

Compton Tortoiseshell butterfly

(Note: All links below are to external sites.) Greetings, BugFans, This butterfly needs a better name!  (More about that, later) The BugLady found this beauty in the woods on a cool April day. Like the Mourning Cloak, of recent BOTW… Read More

Listing the Monarch

monarch butterfly

Greetings, BugFans, The BugLady wrote this article for the newsletter of the Western Great Lakes Bird and Bat Observatory (an organization that would love to have your support). Although they meet the criteria to be included as a Threatened species… Read More

Mourning Cloak Revisited

mourning cloak butterfly

(Note: All links below are to external websites and leave the UWM website.) Howdy, BugFans, The BugLady walked in the woods, recently, on an unseasonably warm, spring day, accompanied by Mourning Cloak and Eastern Comma butterflies. It’s so cool to… Read More

Bugs in the News X

Jumping Spider

(Note: All links below are to external websites and leave the UWM website.) Howdy, BugFans, While we’ve been quietly going about our business during this way-too-long pandemic (you know things are bad when you fantasize about going to a board… Read More

The Twelve Bugs of Christmas

red-spotted purple butterfly

Season’s Greetings, BugFans, The BugLady can tell that the Christmas Season has rolled around because the Dr. Who marathon is about to start, and once again, Paul and Mary are showing us how easy it is to concoct showstopper desserts… Read More

Monarch Butterfly Rerun

monarch butterfly

Howdy, BugFans, The BugLady saw her first monarch butterfly about 10 days ago, and today saw the first on her property.  Here’s a rerun from two years ago on the status of the monarch, with different pictures, and a few… Read More

September Scenes

The leaves are starting to fall here in God’s Country, the birds are moving, and as of yesterday it’s officially autumn (Yikes!). But there are still some bugs out there – like wildflowers, some species of insects bloom in the spring, some in the summer, and others in the fall. The imperative to reproduce is strong as the days get shorter; most insects live for about a calendar year, mainly in their immature stages, with a short-but-productive adult stage. Most leave behind eggs or pupae or partly-grown offspring to weather the winter.

Summer Survey 2019

The BugLady hopes that you’ve been getting out on the trail and drinking in the lushness of the summer. Subjects of this summer’s survey include wasps, aphids, syrphids, and katydids.

Gray Hairstreak Butterfly

Gray Hairstreaks are the most widely distributed American hairstreak, and they spill over into Canada, Central America, and the northern edge of South America. They’ve been seen in more than half of Wisconsin counties. Why “hairstreak?” These small butterflies have one or two slim (hair-like) tails on the lower “corner” of each hindwing.

Northern Metalmark Butterfly

Northern Metalmarks are subtly beautiful, with patterns of silver/metal/rust on dark wings. NMs like open/dappled stream edges and meadows near woodlands with shale, limestone or serpentine rock barrens or outcroppings close by. Their historical range is believed to have been much larger. Multiple factors have led to their decline, and it’s mostly a familiar chorus.