The Missouri Bee-killer, Robber Fly

Note that all links lead to external sites. Howdy, BugFans, Robber flies are a very cool bunch of flies that we have visited a number of times in the past. To appreciate the array of sizes and shapes and colors… Read More

Bugs at the End of Summer

Note: Some links below go to external sites. Howdy, BugFans, The general rule of thumb is that if you want to find insects, look at flowers. Even though summer is fading, there are still flowers in bloom. Some Liatris/blazing stars… Read More

Black-margined Loosestrife Beetle

Note: All links below go to external sites. Howdy, BugFans, Purple loosestrife is a beautiful plant, with great wands of magenta flowers waving in the breeze. Some say that, like a long list of other invasives, it entered the country… Read More

Rose Chafer Beetle

beetle on white flowers

Note: All links below go to external sites. Greetings, BugFans, The BugLady was surprised, as she trekked across the dunes at Kohler-Andrae State Park one steamy day in early July, to find this small, gangly beetle hanging out on some… Read More

Bugs Without Bios XVI

Currant tip borer

Greetings, BugFans, It’s time again to celebrate the bugs that fly under the radar – bugs that are neither famous nor infamous and that live alongside of us, about whom not much has been written. All three of these species,… Read More

Maine Leaf Beetle

chrysomela mainensis

(Note: All links in this article go to external sites.) Greetings, BugFans, The BugLady found these (preoccupied) beetles on a trip to Spruce Lake Bog in June. They’re in the Leaf beetle family, Chrysomelidae, which, along with weevils and rove… Read More

Bugs without Bios XV

cerambycid

Howdy, BugFans, Bugs without Bios are bugs who have no fan clubs or t-shirts or Wanted posters and who go about their daily lives without attracting too much attention, yet are still worthy of our admiration.. Actually, there probably is… Read More

Goldsmith Beetle

Goldsmith Beetle view of top

Howdy, BugFans, The BugLady found this beetle recently (what’s left of it anyway) on what remains of her dune (not much, after the winter storms) (sadly, her Doodlebug Refuge was mostly washed away, and this year houses just a single… Read More

Wildflower Watch –Marsh Marigold

May is American wetlands month, so we’ll end it in the swamp, in the company of Marsh Marigolds, the flowers that turn newly thawed wetlands a riotous yellow from the last days of April through much of May. Skunk cabbage and pussy willows may whisper the arrival of spring, but marsh marigolds crank up the volume. The BugLady should have started this project two weeks ago when the marsh marigold was at its peak, but the truth is that despite the masses of flowers it produces, she seldom sees many insects on it, and the ones she sees are as likely to be resting as dining.

Bugs without Bios IX

Beetle Calleida

Bugs without Bios celebrates the small-but-mighty insects that, mostly unsung, sneak below our radar daily. Today’s catch have three things in common – their identifications are all “probable;” they’re all carnivores; and on each of the three, the BugLady’s Google search ran out in fewer than ten pages.