Internal Grant Programs

UWM supports faculty in their roles as scholars and researchers, teachers, and service providers. Internal grant programs provide funding for travel to present research and attend conferences, develop research initiatives, foster international collaboration, and develop public service projects. The Office of Research administers internal grant programs, and all applications are peer-reviewed by committees comprised of faculty members.

Arts and Humanities Research Travel Award

Description: Provides research travel grants for faculty on tenure/tenure-track appointments in the Arts and Humanities Division for (1) conducting research, (2) presenting research results, and (3) creative activity (performance, exhibition). Requests for travel solely for conference/meeting attendance will not be considered. Requests for travel pertaining to the pursuit of research and creative activity will be given higher priority than requests to present at professional conferences and meetings. All activities should be connected to the applicant’s overall research agenda.

Eligibility: Deans and Associate Deans are not eligible. Only one application per UWM faculty, instructional or research academic staff per travel period will be considered.

Award: The maximum award is $500 for domestic travel; $900 for international travel. (In some cases, larger awards may be made.) Awards may be combined with funding from other institutional sources.

Deadlines: Two submission windows per year based on the dates of your proposed travel:

  • May 4, 2015 for travel dates between January 1, 2015 and December 31, 2015.

Application: Describe in detail the purpose of your travel as relevant to your request below. Compose your statement in advance and then copy/paste in the appropriate place within the application (available within six weeks of the deadline).

  • Conducting research: Describe what you intend to accomplish during your travel, how this relates to your research agenda, and the anticipated outcomes (e.g., monograph, articles, grants).
  • Presenting research results: Explain the importance of your participation in the particular event for which you are requesting funding.
  • Creative activity (performance, exhibition): Explain the importance of your participation in the particular event for which you are requesting funding.

Application Web site

Travel Policies: Awardees must comply with the UWM and UWM System travel guidelines and any other Department/School/College instructions (see your Unit Business Representative). All out-of-state travel requires completion of the Travel Approval Request form. See UWM Business & Financial Services for complete campus travel information, policies, and procedures.

Questions? Contact Kathleen Koch at kjk@uwm.edu or 229-3699.

The Research Growth Initiative® (RGI)

Description: Seeding program that supports high-quality research projects in the early stages. The program’s objective is to increase UWM’s research productivity, scholarship, creative endeavors, collaborative projects, and external funding by investing in projects selected through an independent and objective process.

Eligible Projects:

  • Are early-stage research projects in need of seed funding for data collection, archival work, and establishing proof-of concept.
  • Have a one-year timeline.
  • Will lead to the submission of competitive proposals for externally funded—and thereby self-sustaining—individual and collaborative research through grants, fellowships, or university/industry partnerships.

Eligible Project Expenses:

  • UWM personnel: Post-docs, research assistants, and hourly students.
  • Non-UWM personnel: Payments to non-UWM personnel or agencies must be done on a fee-for-service basis.
  • Capital Expenditures: Includes renovations and equipment that each cost $10,000 or more and have a lifetime beyond that of the project. Equipment requests must be part of a specific research project. Cost-sharing at 50% is required for all capital expenditures.
  • Other Standard Expenses such as materials and supplies, travel, user fees, purchase of services, and publication costs.

Applicant Eligibility: Must have UWM faculty or academic staff appointments, Principal Investigator status, and the expectation of a continuing appointment. Lead PIs may submit only one proposal per application cycle, although they can be co-PIs on other proposals. Those who received an RGI award in the last two years (funding began July 2013 or July 2014) are ineligible to apply for the 2015-16 funding cycle.

Additional criteria is listed in the RGI Request for Proposals.

Project Narrative Format: Limited to six single-spaced pages with one-inch margins, including references, figures, and tables. Font size: minimum 11 point in Arial, Tahoma, Times New Roman, or Georgia.

Review Process:
RGI employs a two-stage review process.

Stage 1: Scientific/Scholarly Review
All proposals are externally reviewed for scientific/scholarly merit according to three criteria:

  • Quality
  • Return on Investment
  • Risk

Stage 2: Award Selection
Funding decisions are made by Office of Research leadership, taking into account final ratings and reviewer comments.

Download the full RGI Request for Proposals for complete program details and proposal submission guidelines. Proposals must be completed and submitted using the secure RGI Application Website.

2015-2016 RGI Funding Cycle:
Submission deadline: October 6, 2014; 9:00 a.m.
Final review: January-February 2015
Award announcement: Mid-April 2015
Award letters sent: Mid-May 2015
Funds available: July 2015

Program Questions?
Contact Kathleen Koch at kjk@uwm.edu or 414-229-3699

Technical Questions? (Online application, budget form)
Contact Shane Dunlap at jsdunlap@uwm.edu or 414-229-3160.

Past RGI Award Recipients

2015

Twelve proposals have been chosen for funding in the 2015-2016 Research Growth Initiative®, an internal seed-funding competition aimed at enhancing the university’s research and scholarly work and supporting the state’s economic development through innovation. One Distinguished Professor, five full professors, three associate professors, and three assistant professors received awards. Six recipients are first-time RGI awardees.

Daniel Agterberg
Professor, Physics
High Temperature Superconductors: Pair Density Wave Order in the Pseudogap Phase

Joel Berkowitz
Professor, Foreign Languages and Literature
Preserving the Legacy of the Yiddish Theatre in the Digital Age

Patrick Brady
Professor, Physics
Astrophysics of Extreme Environments
UWM Co-PIs: Philip Chang, Jolien Creighton, Dawn Erb, David Kaplan, Alan Wiseman, Xavier Siemens, Physics

Michael Carvan
Associate Professor, Freshwater Sciences
Epigenetic Transgenerational Impacts of Great Lakes Chemicals of Concern
UWM Co-PIs: David Petering, Chemistry and Biochemistry; Hector Bravo, Civil and Environmental Engineering; David Garman, John Janssen, Freshwater Sciences; Junhong Chen, Mechanical Engineering; Peter Tonellato, Public Health

Carol Hirschmugl
Professor, Physics
Fluorescence imaging and mid infrared spectroscopy of diabetic retinopathy
UWM Co-PIs: Mahsa Ranji, Electrical Engineering

Emily Latch
Associate Professor, Biological Sciences
A landscape genomics framework to study introgression in non-model species

Robin Mello
Associate Professor, Theatre
A Tale of Scale
UWM Co-PI: Jean Creighton, Physics

Adel Nasiri
Professor, Electrical Engineering
Integration of Batteries and Li-Ion Capacitors to Extend Battery Life in Vehicle Start Stop Applications

Xiaohua Peng
Assistant Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
Hydrogen Peroxide Activated Quinone Methide Prodrugs for Tumor-Specific Destruction
UWM Co-PI: Alexander Arnold, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Aleksandra Snowden
Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice
Off-Premise Alcohol Outlet Characteristics and Milwaukee Violence Rates

Xuexia Wang
Assistant Professor, Public Health
Methods to Detect Gene-Environment Interactions in Secondary Cancers

Michael Weinert
Distinguished Professor, Physics
Band Offsets in Lateral Junctions of 2-D materials,
UWM Co-PI: Michael Weinert, Physics

2014

Seventeen proposals have been chosen for funding in the 2014-2015 Research Growth Initiative®, an internal seed-funding competition aimed at enhancing the university’s research and scholarly work and supporting the state’s economic development through innovation.Four proposals from Biological Sciences were funded, as well as three from Chemistry and Biochemistry. Seven full professors and seven associate professors earned awards, as well as three assistant professors.

S. Scott Graham
Assistant Professor, English
Evaluating the Impacts of Lay Stakeholder Inclusion and Industry Affiliations on FDA Pharmaceuticals Policy Decision-Making
Co-PIs: William Keith, Professor, English; Sang-Yeon Kim, Assistant Professor, Communication

Laodong Guo
Professor, Freshwater Sciences
Evaluating Reservoir Effects Of Radiocarbon and its Use For Tracking Carbon Dynamics in Lake Michigan

Guilherme Indig
Associate Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
Intraoperative Fluorescence Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy Of Advanced Ovarian Cancer

Jeffrey Karron
Associate Professor, Biological Sciences
Understanding the Evolutionary Tug-Of-War Between Male and Female Function in Hermaphroditic Flowering Plants

Vincent Larson
Professor, Mathematical Sciences
From Cloud Parameterization to Subgrid Variability Parameterization

Chiu Law
Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering
Chirped Fiber Optical Current Sensor
Co-PIs: Rani El-Hajjar, Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering & Mechanics

Mark McBride
Professor, Biological Sciences
Novel Cellulose Utilization System of Cytophaga hutchinsonii

Graham Moran
Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
Redefining Renalase: The Discovery of a New Enzymatic Activity

Hanyong Park
Assistant Professor, Linguistics
Longitudinal L2 learning of Korean coronal obstruents in perception and production

Donna Pasternak
Associate Professor, Curriculum and Instruction
How are English teacher preparation programs educating English teachers to teach into the 21st century? A study of the current practices used to educate English teachers in a time of teacher accountability.

David Petering
Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
Revealing the Cadmium Proteome with Metalloproteomic Methods

Ora John Reuter
Assistant Professor, Political Science
Political Machines at Work: Voter Mobilization and Electoral Subversion in the Workplace

Linda Whittingham
Professor, Biological Sciences
Genetic and Physiological Mechanisms of Ornament Expression in a Warbler

William Wood
Associate Professor, Anthropology
Participatory Community Museum Exhibition Development for Mangrove Conservation Education at Ventanilla, Oaxaca, Mexico: Formative Exhibition Evaluation

Iris Xie
Professor, Information Studies
Universal Accessibility of Digital Libraries: Design of Help Mechanisms for Blind Users
Co-PIs: Rakesh Babu, Assistant Professor, School of Information Studies; Wooseob Jeong, Associate Professor, School of Information Studies

Dazhong Zhao
Associate Professor, Biological Sciences
Determining the SERK1/2-EMS1 Receptor Kinase Complex in Cell Differentiation
Co-PIs: Valerica Raicu, Associate Professor, Physics

Chao Zhu
Associate Professor, Mathematical Sciences
On Nonnegative Stochastic Processes and Their Financial Applications

2013

Thirty-two proposals have been chosen for funding in the 2013-2014 Research Growth Initiative®, an internal seed-funding competition aimed at enhancing the university’s research and scholarly work and supporting the state’s economic development through innovation.

Twenty awards went to assistant professors, six to associate professors, and six to full and Distinguished professors.

The departments of Biological Sciences and Mechanical Engineering each earned four awards; Electrical Engineering, Geosciences, and mathematical Sciences each received three.

George Barganier
Assistant Professor, Africology
Fanon’s Children: The Black Panther Party and the Rise of the Crips and Bloods

Anne Basting
Associate Professor, Theatre
Arts At Home

Julie Bowles
Assistant Professor, Geosciences
The Long Valley Volcanic Field: Constraining the Geomagnetic Field and Local Volcanic Processes

Woo Jin Chang
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Paper-fluidic electrochemical heavy metal detection

Junhong Chen
Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Exploration of Graphene-Based Nanohybrids for Electrocatalysis

Thomas Consi
Assistant Professor, Freshwater Sciences
A Prototype Unmanned Aerial Vehicle for Tracking Radio-Tagged Sturgeon

Madhusudan Dey
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Mechanistic Insights into Ire1-HAC1/Xbp1 Signaling Pathway
Co-PIs: David Frick, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Peter Dunn
Professor, Biological Sciences
Immunogenetics of an endangered bird

Rani El-Hajjar
Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering and Mechanics
Scaffolding and Forming Methods for Scalability of Thermosetting Nanocellulose Composites
Co-PIs: Krisha Pillai, Mechanical Engineering

Jennifer Gutzman
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Regulation of cell shortening during brain morphogenesis

Weon Shik Han
Assistant Professor, Geosciences
Themorphysically Driven One, Two, and Three-Phase Fluids Transitions of Geologically Stored Supercritical CO2: Combination of Theoretical, Numerical and Field Studies
Co-PIs: Chang Soo Kim, Materials Science and Engineering

Fred Helmstetter
Professor, Psychology
Dissecting cortical-subcortical interactions in the regulation of fear memory with optogenetics
Co-PIs: Devin Mueller, Psychology; Ramin Pashaie, Electrical Engineering

Mohd Helwany
Professor, Civil Engineering and Mechanics
Thermomechanical Behavior of Energy Piles
Co-PIs: Tien-chien Jen, Mechanical Engineering; Adel Nasiri, Electrical Engineering

Gerlinde Hoebel
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Cross-modal interactions and leader preferences

Yi Hu
Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering
Electroacoustic Stimulation

Kyongboon Kwon
Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology
Emotional Socialization in the Social Network of Late Elementary Children: The Impact on Prosocial, Aggressive, and Withdrawn Behaviors

Istvan Lauko
Associate Professor, Mathematical Sciences
Novel optical detection of discrete layers in Lake Michigan ecosystem structure
Co-PIs: Carmen Aguilar-Diaz and Russell Cuhel, Freshwater Sciences

Ying Li
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Efficient Solar-Driven CO2 Reforming of Methane by Novel Composite Catalysts

Lindsay McHenry
Associate Professor, Geosciences
Hydrothermal Alteration of high Fe Icelandic Basalts, Analog for Mars Aqueous Processes
Co-PI: Barry Cameron, Geosciences

James Moyer Jr
Associate Professor, Psychology
Neurobiological Analyses of Aging-Related Deficits in Cognitive Flexibility
Co-PIs: Jeri-Anne Lyons, Biomedical Sciences

Wilkistar Otieno
Assistant Professor, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
Investigating Reverse Supply Chains and Remanufacturing Processes as Feasible Alternatives to Product Recovery
Co-PIs: Vishnuteja Nanduri, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering; Anthony Ross, Lubar School of Business

Ramin Pashaie
Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering
Interrogation of Cortical Dynamics via Optogenetic-mElectroCorticoGraphy

Anne Pycha
Assistant Professor, Linguistics
Explaining phonological patterns with memories

Mahsa Ranji
Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering
Optical imaging techniques for early detection of radiation-induced lung injury

Paru Shah
Assistant Professor, Political Science
Candidate Characteristics in Local Elections: Developing a Data Curation Community

Kurt Svoboda
Associate Professor, Public Health
Neural crest cell development in zebrafish: Anatomical analysis in 3-dimensional space

Tanya Tiffany
Associate Professor, Art History
Visual Culture and Feminine Devotion in the Early Modern Spanish Empire

Anastasios Tsonis
Distinguished Professor, Mathematical Sciences
Climate models: A new Babel?
Co-PIs: Kyle Swanson, Mathematical Sciences

Ying-chih Wang
Assistant Professor, Occupational Science and Technology
Translating Modified Ashworth Scale into Neurophysiological, Quantitative Kinematic and Kinetic Values
Co-PIs: Jay Kapellusch and Roger Smith, Occupational Science and Technology

Dexuan Xie
Professor, Mathematical Sciences
New Nonlocal Continuum Electrostatic Models and Their Fast Numerical Solvers

Zengwang Xu
Assistant Professor, Geography
Modeling the diffusion and intervention of H5N1 in a realistically connected population in Milwaukee city: a social spatial network approach

Chris Yuan
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Sustainable Development of High Capacity Lithium Ion Batteries for Electric Vehicles

2012

Thirty-nine proposals have been chosen for funding in the 2012-2013 Research Growth Initiative®, an internal seed-funding competition aimed at enhancing the university’s research and scholarly work and supporting the state’s economic development through innovation.

Fifteen awards went to assistant professors, 13 to associate professors, and 11 to full professors.

Daniel Agterberg
Professor, Physics
Theory of the Electron Gas at Oxide Interfaces

Filipe Alberto
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Metapopulation Genetics of Giant Kelp Macrocystis Pyrifera in Southern California Bight

Ryoichi Amano
Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Wastewater Management Using Sewage Aerator and Separator Cyclones

Alexander Arnold
Assistant Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
Vitamin D Receptor-Coregulator Interactions As Anticancer Targets

Ferne Bronson
Professor, Dance
The Sweet Grass Project: Preservation of African Movement Traditions Present in Gullah Culture of the Carolinas and Georgia Coast

Philip Chang
Assistant Professor, Physics
The Plasma Physics and Cosmological Impact of TeV Blazars

Jian Chen
Associate Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
Transparent Conductive Ceramic-Graphene Nanolaminates

Junhong Chen
Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Exploration of Graphene Array Electrodes for Energy Storage

Kamran Diba
Assistant Professor, Psychology
Optogenetic Silencing of Hippocampal Inputs During Spatial Learning

Karyn Frick
Associate Professor, Psychology
Roles of Specific Estrogen Receptors in Mediating the Beneficial Effects of Estrogens On Memory in Middle-Aged Females

Peter Geissinger
Associate Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
Measurement of Electric Fields at Protein Active Sites: Towards Probing Electrostatic Structure-Function Relationships

Zhen He
Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering and Mechanics
Development of Novel Osmotic Microbial Desalination Cells for Sustainable Wastewater Treatment and Desalination

John Isbell
Professor, Geosciences
Occurrence and Significance of Northern High Paleo-Latitude Deposits of the Late Paleozoic Ice Age in Northeastern Asia (Siberia)

David Kaplan
Assistant Professor, Physics
Isolated Neutron Stars: the Impact of Magnetic Field Decay

Christine Larson
Associate Professor, Psychology
Isolating the Mechanisms of Impaired Attentional Control in Social Anxiety: Implications for Attention Modification Training

Yue Liu
Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering and Mechanics
A New Decision Support Tool for Warranting Detour Operations During Freeway Corridor Incident Management

Kristen Murphy
Assistant Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
Processing Differences By Gender: Investigating Persistent Differential Item Functioning General Chemistry Items

Vishnuteja Nanduri
Assistant Professor, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
Understanding the Electricity-Water-Climate Change Nexus: a Multi-Agent Simulation Framework and Efficient Reinforcement Learning Solution Techniques

Adel Nasiri
Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering
Advanced Wind Turbine Topology and Controls to Improve Transient Power Stability and Provide Short-Term Support

Michael Nosonovsky
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Ultra-Durable Wear-Resistant 3D Superhydrophobic Surfaces and Concretes

Abbas Ourmazd
Professor, Physics
Determining the Structure and Conformations of Macromolecular Complexes

Ramin Pashaie
Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering
Interrogation of Large-Scale Neural Circuits With Optogenetic-fMRI

Xiaohua Peng
Assistant Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
Achieving Turnover in DNA-Templated Fluorogenic “Click” Ligation for Sequence-Specific DNA Mutation Detection

Gabriella Pinter
Associate Professor, Mathematical Sciences
Establishing a Modeling Framework for the Investigation of Nano-Scale Drivers of Biogeochemical Cycling in Freshwater Ecosystems

Christopher Quinn
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Investigation of ITSN-1 Function in Axon Guidance.

Mahsa Ranji
Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering
Optical Redox Imaging and NMR Metabolomics As Multi-Modal Tools to Monitor Metabolic Dysfunction in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Dilano Saldin
Professor, Physics
Reconstructing the Structure of Viruses Using an X-Ray Laser

Marius Schmidt
Associate Professor, Physics
Structure and Function of MtrC: an Electricity Generating Protein

Stefan Schnitzer
Associate Professor, Biological Sciences
Do Lianas Redirect Successional Trajectories in Regenerating Tropical Forests?

Arijit Sen
Associate Professor, Architecture
Intertwined Geographies of Transcultural Contact: Cultural Landscapes of Muslim Immigrants in Milwaukee and Chicago

Matthew Smith
Assistant Professor, Freshwater Sciences
In Situ Technology to Enhance Chemical, Physical and Biological Monitoring in Lake Michigan

Nathaniel Stern
Associate Professor, Art & Design
Body Language: a Suite of Four Interactive Installations

J. Rudi Strickler
Professor, Biological Sciences
Microfluidics and Form and Function in Cyclopoid Copepods

Peter Tonellato
Professor, Public Health
Guiding Warfarin Clinical Trial Design Using Pharmacogenetic Simulations

Anastasios Tsonis
Professor, Mathematical Sciences
Knowledge Discovery in Climate

Jorg Woehl
Associate Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
Corral Trapping of Single Molecules in Solution: Theory and Applications

Changshan Wu
Associate Professor, Geography
Urban Impervious Surface Estimation Using Remote Sensing Techniques: A Simulation Approach

Ching-Hong Yang
Associate Professor, Biological Sciences
A Lifestyle Choice for Ecological Success and Pathogenicity: Cell Aggregates and Bimodal Expression of T3SS

Jun Zhang
Professor, Electrical Engineering
3D CT Image Segmentation for Security Applications

2011

Thirty-three proposals have been chosen for funding in the 2011-2012 Research Growth Initiative®, an internal seed-funding competition aimed at enhancing the university’s research and scholarly work and supporting the state’s economic development through innovation.

As a testament to the improving quality of RGI submissions, the independent experts and scholars who reviewed the applications awarded double-alpha quality ratings to over 40 percent of this year’s 112 proposals. The final selection of awardees, based on the external reviewers’ ratings of the three evaluation criteria, was made by a committee (RGI coordinator Kathleen Koch and Associate Deans Michael Liston and Douglas Woods) appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School.

Five proposals from Biological Sciences were funded, as well as four each from Engineeringand Physics. Social sciences, professions, and the humanities were also well represented, including the first-ever award for Africology.

Reflecting the growing emphasis on multi- and interdisciplinary research, seven of the 15 collaborative projects funded feature investigators from multiple departments.

Unless noted, Co-PIs are from the same departments as the PIs. The awardees are:

Carolyn Aita
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Predicting Phase Formation and Transitions in Functional Oxide Nanolaminates

Rachel Buff
History
This Way Out: A History of Deportation from the U.S., 1935-1970

Jian Chen
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Remote-Controlled, Self-Healing Shape Memory Polymer Composites

Madhusudan Dey, Biological Sciences
The Novel Kinase KIN2 Signaling in Endoplasmic Stress
Co-PI(s): Valerica Raicu, Physics

Rebecca Dunham
English
Black Horizon: A Documentary in Verse

David Frick
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Drug Discovery for Hepatitis C: Hit-to-lead Development of Helicase Inhibitors

Marija Gajdardziska-Josifovska
Physics
Advanced Electron Microscopy and Holography of Multiscale Multiferroic Materials
Co-PI(s): Prasenjit Guptasarma, Marvin Schofield

Pat Goldsmith
Sociology
Residential Segregation and Discrete Choice Analysis
Co-PI(s): William Velez

Deborah Hannula
Psychology
Recollection as a 2-Stage Process: A Converging Methods Approach to Investigation of Memory, Awareness, and the Brain.

Carol Hirschmugl
Physics
Thermally Derived Graphene Based Nanocrystalline Sheets for Lithium Ion Batteries
Co-PI(s): Junhong H Chen, Mechanical Engineering; Marija Gajdardziska-Josifovksa

Gerlinde Hoebel
Biological Sciences
Preference Functions and the Evolution of Multimodal Signals

Shale Horowitz
Political Science
Measuring Leadership Preferences in Ethno-Territorial Conflicts

Jennifer Johung
Art History
Vital Architecture: Sustaining Life and Living Space

Jonathan Kanter
Psychology
Culturally Enhanced Behavioral Activation for African Americans with Depression
Co-PI(s): Michael Brondino, Social Work; Shakoor Lee, Nursing

Changsoo Kim
Materials Engineering
Theoretical Study of the Microstructural Impacts on the Mechanical Performance of Metal-Matrix Nano Composites
Co-PI(s): Pradeep Rohatgi

Arash Mafi
Electrical Engineering
Gain-Guiding Optical Fiber Lasers: Fundamental Limitations and Practical Solutions

Anna Mansson McGinty
Geography
The Muslim Milwaukee Project
Co-PI(s): Caroline Seymour-Jorn, Comparative Literature; Kristin Sziarto

Mark McBride
Biological Sciences
Novel Mechanisms of Cellulose and Chitin Utilization by Members of the Bacterial Phylum Bacteroidetes

Sandra McLellan
Freshwater Sciences
Microbial Communities as Indicators of Oil Contamination on Coastal Beaches

Susan McRoy, Computer Science
A Feasibility Study of Two-Way Messaging for Prostate Cancer Patients
Co-PI(s): Hayeon Song, Communication

Katie Mosack
Psychology
A Test of the Association Between Subjective Self-Reports and Objective Measures of Social Support-Related Communication among HIV-Affected African American Female Dyads
Co-PI(s): Michael Brondino, Social Work; Patricia Stevens, Nursing

Ramin Pashaie
Electrical Engineering
Optogenetic Visual Neuroprosthetics

Mahsa Ranji
Electrical Engineering
Lung Oxygen Toxicity: Optical Biopsy and Imaging Techniques

Marius Schmidt
Physics
The Reaction of Nitric Oxide with Mycobacterium tuberculosis HemoglobinN
Co-PI(s): Arsenio Pacheco, Chemistry; Alan Schwabacher, Chemistry

Stefan Schnitzer
Biological Sciences
Identifying the Pathogens That Regulate Tree Species Diversity and Abundance in Tropical Forests

Jeffrey Sommers
Africology
Spatial Fixes and Hegemonic Re-Rrderings: Africa’s Place in the Emerging New Order

Scott Strath
Human Movement Science
Understanding Multi-Level Barriers to Physical Activity and Health Behaviors in Older Adults
Co-PI(s): Kevin Keenan, Ann Swartz

Michael Weinert
Physics
Topological Insulators: Growth and Electronic Properties
Co-PI(s): Lian Li

Zeyun Yu
Computer Science
A Meshless Approach to Studying Cell-wide Calcium Signaling

Chris Yuan
Mechanical Engineering
Sustainable Development of Atomic-scale Nano-coating Technology
Co-PI(s): Tien-chien Jen

Jun Zhang
Electrical Engineering
Automatic Patient Search for Breast Cancer Clinical Trials
Co-PI(s): Xiangming Mu, Information Studies; Tian Zhao; Computer Science

Dazhong Zhao
Biological Sciences
MicroRNA-mediated Cross-Talk Between ABA and Auxin Signaling in Arabidopsis

Chao ZhuMathematical Sciences
Singular Stochastic Control of Regime Switching Diffusion: Viscosity Solution and Linear Programming

2010

Twenty-seven proposals have been chosen for funding in the 2010-2011 Research Growth Initiative®, an internal seed-funding competition aimed at enhancing the university’s research and scholarly work and supporting the state’s economic development through innovation.

The winners were chosen from the original pool of 139 by independent review panels consisting of experts and scholars from prominent U.S. research institutions.

This year’s projects come from a variety areas—from biological sciences, engineering, and physics, to architecture, history, and visual art—and reflect the growing emphasis on multi- and interdisciplinary research. Six projects feature investigators from multiple departments, compared to three in 2009-2010.

Unless noted, co-PIs are from the same departments as the PIs. The awardees are:

YiQiang Cheng
Biological Sciences
Preparation of Lead Anticancer Compounds for Preclinical Evaluations

Timothy Cleary
Educational Psychology
Efficacy of Self-Regulation Empowerment Program: A classroom-based intervention

Kimberly Cosier
Visual Art
Teaching and Learning Critical Visual Literacies with Urban Youth
Co-PI: Laura Trafi-Prats

Carolyn Eichner
History
In the Name of the Mother: Radical Naming, Marriage, and the Matronym

Dawn Erb
Physics
The Youngest Galaxies in the Young Universe

Margaret Fraiser
Geosciences
Testing the End-Permian Mass Extinction Recovery Paradigm

Thomas Hooyer
Geosciences
Evaluating glacier quarrying: Mapping recently deglaciated bedrock surfaces to determine the importance of pre-existing fractures in bedrock

M. Mahmun Hossain
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Novel Synthesis of Tryptophan-based Microtubule Inhibitors

Jay Kapellusch
Occupational Therapy
Injury Management System for Strategic Reduction of Workplace Injuries
Co-PIs: Naira Campbell-Kyureghan, Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering; Arun Garg, I&ME; Matthew Petering, I&ME

Han Joo Lee
Psychology
Examining the Nature of Sustained Attentional Regulation among Individuals with Social Phobia
Co-PI: Christine Larson

Arash Mafi
Electrical Engineering
Wavelength Dependence of Birefringence in Optical Fibers: The Nonlinear Implications
Co-PIs: Chiu Tai Law, Hao Zhang

Sandra McLellan
WATER Institute
Identification of new alternative indicators of sewage contamination
Co-PI: Anastasios Tsonis, Mathematical Sciences

Gretchen Meyer
Field Station
Genetic structure of an invasive plant in its native and introduced ranges
Co-PIs: Sara Hoot, Biological Sciences; Mai Phillips, Biological Sciences

Ian Musson
Mathematical Sciences
Enveloping Algebras and Invariant Differential Operators.

Michael Nosonovsky
Mechanical Engineering
Self-organization at the sliding interface: towards biomimetic self-lubrication and self-replenishing
Co-PIs: Emmanuel Wornyoh, Mechanical Engineering; Pradeep Rohatgi, Materials Engineering

Ramin Pashaie
Electrical Engineering
Optoelectronic Programming of the Brain
Co-PI: Mahsa Ranji

Krishna Pillai
Mechanical Engineering
Simulating the Making of Dual-Scale Metal-Matrix Composites using the Presure Infiltration Process
Co-PI: Pradeep Rohatgi, Materials Engineering

Valerica Raicu
Physics
Drug-targeted signal transduction: instrumentation and methodology for non-invasive probing of GPCR signaling
Co-PI: Sergei Kuchin, Biological Sciences

Paul Roebber
Mathematical Sciences
Simulating Warm Season Precipitation Climate at Regional Scale
Co-PI: Kyle Swanson

Amanda Seligman
History
Encyclopedia of Milwaukee
Co-PI: Margo Anderson

Na Jin Seo
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
Ergonomic Interventions for Altered Grip Force Direction in Stroke Survivors

J. Carson Smith
Human Movement Sciences
Using Exercise to Enhance Brain Function and Memory in Older Adults at Risk for Alzheimer s Disease
Co-PIs: Anthony Greene, Psychology; Jeri-Anne Lyons, Health Sciences

Andrew Ulijasz
Biological Sciences
Phytochrome-Based Fluorophores (PBFs)

James Wasley
Architecture
Carbon Neutral Building Design: from Case Studies to Conclusions
Co-PIs: Greg Thomson, Dennis Utzinger

Emmanuel Wornyoh
Mechanical Engineering
In Situ Self-Repairing, Self-Replenishing Solid-/Powder-Lubricated Rolling Element Bearings: Modeling and Experiments

Vladislav Yakovlev
Physics
High-throughput vibrational cytometer

Dazhong Zhao
Biological Sciences
Understanding Embryogenesis Regulated by MicroRNA and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR in Arabidopsis

2009

Thirty-eight proposals have been chosen for funding in the 2009-2010 Research Growth Initiative®, an internal seed-funding competition aimed at enhancing the university’s research and scholarly work and supporting the state’s economic development through innovation.

The winners were chosen from the original pool of 136 by independent review panels consisting of experts and scholars from prominent U.S. research institutions.

The projects are drawn from a wide variety of disciplines, from biological sciences, engineering, and physics, to architecture, film, and dance.

Unless noted, co-PIs are from the same departments as the PIs. The awardees are:

Kalman Applbaum
Anthropology
Adherence to Pharmaceutical Treatment: A Clinical Ethnography of Mental Health Services in Wisconsin
Co-PI: Paul Brodwin

Harvey Bootsma
WATER Institute
Carbon Dynamics in a Large, Tropical Lake

Patrick Brady
Physics
Frontiers of Multi-Messenger Astronomy
Co-PIs: Luis Anchordoqui, Jean Creighton, Jolien Creighton, John Friedman, Xavier Siemens, Alan Wiseman

Junhong Chen
Mechanical Engineering
Energy-Efficient Nanoscale Corona Discharge for Ozone Reduction

Jian Chen
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Advanced Carbon Nanotube-Elastomer Composite Infrared Sensors

Thomas Consi
WATER Institute
Micromechanical Enhancement of Sensing — Lessons from Copepods
Co-PI: Rudi Strickler, Biological Sciences

James Cook
Chemistry and Biochemistry
New Gabaergic Drugs to Treat Epilepsy Devoid of Sedative, Ataxic and Amnesic Side Effects Which Do Not Develop Tolerance

Dyanna Czeck
Geosciences
Quantifying Fabrics in Shear Zones

Stephen Dornbos
Geosciences
Sensory Evolution During the Cambrian Radiation

Shaoqin Gong
Mechanical Engineering
Multifunctional Polymeric Drug Nanocarriers for Targeted Cancer Therapy
Co-PI: Douglas Steeber, Biological Sciences

Peninnah Kako
Nursing
HIV Transmission Risk, Access to Treatment, and Self Management of Illness Over Time: An In-Depth Longitudinal Study of HIV-Infected Women in Kenya
Co-PIs: Loren Galvao, Patricia Stevens

Kevin Keenan
Human Movement Sciences
Cortico-Muscular Control of Hand Function in Older Adults
Co-PI: Jerome Smith

J. Val Klump
WATER Institute
Application of New Methodology for Determining Benthic Metabolism in the Great Lakes

Sergey Kravtsov
Mathematical Sciences
Mesoscale Ocean Eddies and Climate Change Over the Southern Ocean

Vincent Larson
Mathematical Sciences
A Unified Parameterization for Clouds, Turbulence, the Surface Layer, and the Planetary Boundary Layer

Christine Larson
Psychology
The Influence of Rumination on Sustained Experience of Negative Affect: Bridging the Gap from Prolonged Brief Emotional Experiences to Depression

Lian Li
Physics
Magnetic Graphene
Co-PI: Michael Weinert

Simone Linhares Ferro
Dance
Bumba-Meu-Boi: The Integration of Contemporary and Folk Dance as a Vehicle of Social and Historical Activism

Colleen Ludwig
Film
Elemental Bodies: A Suite of Four Immersive Installations with Sensor Control

Renee Meyers
Communication
GroupBank Archival and Retrieval System
Co-PI: Elizabeth Buchanan, Information Studies

Devin Mueller
Psychology
Prefrontal Regulation of Drug Seeking After Extinction
Co-PI: James Moyer

Kristen Murphy
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Rapid Knowledge Assessment: The Development and Validation of a New Assessment Instrument in Chemistry

Abbas Ourmazd
Physics
Direct Determination of Structure by Scattering
Co-PI: Peter Schwander

Arsenio Pacheco
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Protein-NO Interactions by Time-Resolved Protein X-Ray Crystallography
Co-PI: Marius Schmidt, Physics

David Petering
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Zinc Trafficking in Proliferative Cells: Metallothionein and Other Sites

Gyaneshwar Prasad
Biological Sciences
Functional and Ecological Genomics of Sulfonate Utilization by Soybean Nodulating Bradyrhizobium Japonicum

Paul Roebber
Mathematical Sciences
Applied Research Opportunities for Students

Dilano Saldin
Physics
Biomolecular Structure from Ultrashort X-ray Pulses: Exploiting the Symmtery of Random Orientations
Co-PI: Valentin Shneerson

Marie Savundranayagam
Social Work
Caregiving and Alzheimer’s Disease: Impact of Caregiver Communication Strategies on Communication Breakdown, Problem Behaviors, and Stress

Stefan Schnitzer
Biological Sciences
Do Soil-Borne Fungal Pathogens Explain Plant Species Coexistence and Diversity in Tropical Forests? An Experimental Test

Konstantin Sobolev
Civil Engineering and Mechanics
Development of Ultra High Performance Concrete for Service Life of 120 Years
Co-PIs: Habib Tabatabai, Jian Zhao

Ichiro Suzuki
Computer Science
New Research Initiative in Distributed Robotic Systems

Gregory Thomson
Architecture
Energy Efficiency and Historic Preservation: Using Digital Simulation and Empirical Testing to Quantify Passive Systems of Environmental Control in National Register Eligible Buildings of the Early Modern Era

Wilfred Tysoe
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Investigation of Oxidation Catalytic Reaction Pathways on Model Gold-Palladium Alloy Catalysts

Laura Villamil
Anthropology
Margarita Archaeological Project: Investigating the Social Structure of A Classic Maya Urban Community

Linda Whittingham
Biological Sciences
Genetics of Disease Resistance and Female Mate Choice
Co-PI: Peter Dunn

Ching-Hong Yang
Biological Sciences
Development of Type III Secretion System Inhibitors

Hao Zhang
Electrical Engineering
Functional Photoacoustic Imaging of Retinal Microvessels

2008

Thirty-one proposals have been chosen for funding in the 2008-2009 Research Growth Initiative®, an internal seed-funding competition aimed at enhancing the university’s research and scholarly work and supporting the state’s economic development through innovation.

The winners were chosen from the original pool of 137 by independent review panels consisting of experts and scholars from prominent U.S. research institutions.

The projects are drawn from a wide variety of disciplines, from biological sciences, engineering, and physics, to History and French, Italian, and Comparative Literature.

The awardees are:

Daniel Agterberg
Physics
Theory of Pair Density Wave Superconductors

Carmen Aguilar
WATER Institute
Quagga Mussel Feces-Mediated Trace Metal Mobilization in Lake Michigan
Co-PI: Russell Cuhel, WATER Institute

Luis Anchordoqui
Physics
Cosmology and Particle Physics from String Theory

Barry Cameron
Geosciences
The Explosive-Effusive Transition and Compositional Diversity at Basaltic Scoria Cones in Central America

Yichiang Cheng
Biological Sciences
Engineer Novel Anticancer Bio-Agents — A Pilot Study

Peter Dunn
Biological Sciences
Genetic Diversity and Immunity in Endangered Birds

Charles Fink
Biological Sciences
Regulation of Neuronal Plasticity by Protein Phosphatase 1

Peter Geissinger
Chemistry and Biochemistry
High Spatial Resolution Optical Fiber Sensor Arrays for Real-Time, Remote Monitoring of Water Supplies and Potable Water Distribution Networks

Shaoqin Gong
Mechanical Engineering
Bionanocomposite Components with a Solid Skin/Foamed Core Structure Produced via a Novel Supercritical Fluid Assisted Co-Injection Molding Process

Anne Hansen
History
Buddhist Ethics of Love & Attachment in Southeast Asian Narrative Art & Literature

Carol Hirschmugl
Physics
Synchrotron Based Infrared Imaging (SBIRI) and Chemometrics of Living Algal Cells

Gerlinde Hoebel
Biological Sciences
Reinforcement and Behavioral Plasticity

Rebecca Klaper
WATER Institute
Tools for Determining the Impact of Nanomaterials on the Aquatic Model Organism Daphnia Pulex

Bonita Klein-Tasman
Psychology
Early Cognitive and Behavioral Phenotype of NF-1
Co-PI: W. Hobart Davies, Psychology

Sergei Kuchin
Biological Sciences
Regulation of the Snf1 Protein Kinase in Yeast
Co-PI: Marianna Orlova, Biological Sciences

Mary Pat Kunert
Nursing
The Influence of Estrogen on the Structure and Function of Skeletal Muscle Microcirculation in the Dahl S Female Rat

Vincent Larson
Mathematical Sciences
Mixed-phase Layer Clouds in the Arctic and Mid-Latitudes

Jin Li
Civil Engineering and Mechanics
Adhesion and Survival Strategies of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in the Phyllosphere

Paul Lyman
Physics
Atomic Layer Deposition for Production of Polar Oxide Heterostructures

Lucy Mkandawire-Valhmu
Nursing
Violence in the Lives of HIV-Infected Women in Malawi: A Critical Ethnography
Co-PI: Patricia Stevens, Nursing

Adel Nasiri
Electrical Engineering
Power Smoothing and Low Voltage Ride Through Solutions for Wind Turbines
Co-PI: David Yu, Electrical Engineering

Julie Oliver
Biological Sciences
Development of Platelet-Targeted Nanoparticles for Treatment of Thrombotic Stroke

Peter Paik
French, Italian and Comparative Literature
As Realistic as God: World-Making in Literature and Media

Paul Roebber
Mathematical Sciences
Resolving Severe Weather Impacts of Global Climate Change

Xavier Siemens
Physics
Gravitational Wave Data Analysis and Astronomy

Ava Udvadia
Biological Sciences
Functional Analysis of Candidate Genes for Learning and Memory
Co-PI: Fred Helmstetter, Psychology

Michael Weinert
Physics
Polarization and Electric Fields in Heterostructures
Co-PI: Lian Li, Physics

Jorg Woehl
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Measuring Molecular Electric Fields at the Active Sites of Proteins: Development of High Resolution Single Molecule and Hole-Burning Techniques
Co-PI: Peter Geissinger, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Leslie Ying
Electrical Engineering
Superfast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Compressed Sensing
Co-PI: Yi Ming Zou, Mathematical Sciences

Dazhong Zhao
Biological Sciences
Molecular Genetic Dissection of the MicroRNA160 Function in Arabidopsis Development

Jian Zhao
Civil Engineering and Mechanics
A Sensor Based on Electromagnetic Surface Wave Propagation for Bridge Monitoring
Co-PIs: Mukul Goyal, Computer Science; George Hanson, Electrical Engineering; Konstantin Sobolev, Civil Engineering and Mechanics

2007

UWM will fund 42 proposals in the 2007-2008 Research Growth Initiative®, an internal seed-funding competition aimed at enhancing the university’s research and scholarly work and supporting the state’s economic development through innovation.

The winners were chosen from the original pool of 183 by independent review panels consisting of experts and scholars from top U.S. research institutions, including Carnegie Mellon, Cornell, Harvard, Penn State, Northwestern, Stanford, the University of Michigan, and UW-Madison.

Although the funds to be awarded to each project are still under negotiation, the projects are drawn from a wide variety of disciplines, from chemistry, anthropology, and engineering, to urban planning, music, and literature.

The awardees are:

Joseph H. Aldstadt
Chemistry
Modeling The Fate Of Lead In Battlefield Soils
Co-PIs: Erik R. Christensen, Civil Engineering; Timothy J. Grundl, Geosciences

Harvey A. Bootsma
WATER Institute
Lake-Atmosphere Gas Exchange In Lake Michigan

Jian Chen
Chemistry
High-Dielectric-Constant Nanotube-Polymer Composites For Electromechanical Actuation
Co-PI: Sarah Gong, Mechanical Engineering

Anoop K. Dhingra
Mechanical Engineering
Optimum Experimental Design Of A General Purpose Load Transducer

Kathleen A. Dolan
Political Science
Gender Stereotypes Voting for Women and Evaluations of the American Political System

Nadya A. Fouad
Educational Psychology
Barriers For Women In STEM Careers

Sarah Gong
Mechanical Engineering
Novel Photopolymerizable Macromers For Tissue Engineering Applications
Co-PI: Douglas A. Steeber, Biological Sciences

Thomas M. Holbrook
Political Science
Structure Context and Voting Behavior in Mayoral Elections

John L. Isbell
Geosciences
Late Paleozic Gondwanan Ice Age As Exposed In The Depositional Basins In Western Argentina

Tien-Chien Jen
Mechanical Engineering
Electrostatic-Force-Assisted Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Of Nanoparticles: A New Low Temperature Process
Co-PI: Junhong Chen, Mechanical Engineering

Mark V. Johnston
Occupational Therapy
Quality And Coordination Of Care For Persons With Disability: Developing A Survey Measure
Co-PIs: Amy Darragh; Kris Barnekow Occupational Therapy

Sergey Kravtsov
Mathematical Sciences
Stochastic Mode Reduction In Prototype Climate Models

Vincent E. LarsonMathematical Sciences
A Boundary-Layer Parameterization For Weather Forecast Models

Lindsay J. McHenry
Geosciences
Improving Stratigraphic And Chronologic Control For Olduvai Gorge Bed II Archaeological Sites Using Tephra Geochemistry

Graham R. Moran
Chemistry
Kynureine-3-Monooxygenase And Ischemic Stroke

Abbas Ourmazd
Physics
Determining The Structure Of Individual Biological Molecules
Co-PIs: Valentin Shneerson; Dilano K Saldin; Physics

A. Andrew Pacheco
Chemistry
Structure-Function Relationships In Metalloenzymes With Multiple Redox-Active Centers

Sarah K. Patch
Physics
Thermoacoustic Tomography–Attenuation Correction

Zhong-Ren Peng
Urban Planning
Real-Time Traffic Management And Surveillance Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Co-PIs: Jun Zhang, Tian Zhao, Electrical Engineerg & Computer Science

David H. Petering
Chemistry
Cellular Zinc Imaging With Fluorescent Probes: What Is Being Imaged?

Jason R. Puskar
English
Underwriting The Accident: Narratives Of American Chance 1871-1935

Valerica Raicu
Physics
Brain Impedance Measurement Technique For Monitoring Of Anesthetic-Induced State Transition

Joel S. Rast
Political Science
Urban Redevelopment And Machine Building In Postwar Chicago: An Institutionalist Perspective

John D. Richards
Anthropology
Late Prehistoric Ceramic Chronology In The Western Great Lakes
Co-PI: Robert J. Jeske, Anthropology

Pradeep K. Rohatgi
Materials
Demonstration Of Feasibility Of Self Healing Metal Matrix Micro And Nanocomposites
Co-PI: Ryo S. Amano, Mechanical Engineering

Nigel T. Rothfels
Edison Initiative
Death And Butterflies In German New Guinea

Stefan A. Schnitzer
Biological Sciences
Do Lianas Alter Nutrient And Water Dynamics In Tropical Forests? An Experimental Test

Roger O. Smith
Occupational Therapy
Consumer Evaluation Of Assistive Technology: Web Based Data Collection And Reporting
Co-PIs: Kathleen L. Rust, Todd D. Schwanke, R2D2 Center

Ann C. Snyder
Human Movement Sciences
Near-Infrared Photobiomodulation For Immobilization-Induced Muscle Atrophy
Co-PI: Janis T. Eells, Clinical Laboratory Sciences

Douglas A. Steeber
Biological Sciences
Detection Of Infectious Disease Using High-Frequency Microelectronic Biosensors Based On Organic Semiconductors
Co-PI: David P. Klemer, Electrical Engineerg & Computer Science

Patricia E. Stevens
Nursing
Feasibility Study Involving Monolingual Spanish-Speaking Hispanic Women Living With HIV

Hanh Q. Trinh
Health Care Administration & Information
Service Capacity Competition During The Era Of Managed Care: The Case Of Urban Hospitals

Anastasios A. Tsonis
Mathematical Sciences
An Investigation Into The Role Of Atmospheric Teleconnections In Climate

Florence Vatan
French, Italian and Comparative Literature
Mastering Sensibility: The Aesthetics Of Flaubert And Baudelaire In Light Of Contemporary Medical Conceptions

Jon Welstead
Music
Leonard Sorkin International Institute Of Chamber Music Expansion
Co-PIs: Caen Thomason-Redus, Todd Levy, Wolfgang Laufer, Judit Jaimes, Yuri Gandelsman, Ralph Evans, Christopher Burns, Efim Boico, Kevin Hartman, Music

Jeb F. Willenbring
Mathematical Sciences
Mathematical Problems In Quantum Computation

Douglas W. Woods
Psychology
Examining The Role Of Attention In Tic Suppression: A pilot Investigation
Co-PI: Christine A. Conelea, Psychology

Hong (Iris) Xie
School Of Information Studies
Multiple Information Seeking Strategies In Information Retrieval: User Involvement And System Role

Vladislav V. Yakovlev
Physics
Advancing Real-Time Non-Invasive Microscopic Chemical Imaging With Nonlinear Raman Spectroscopy

Ching-Hong Yang
Biological Sciences
Dissecting The Type III Secretion System Regulon In A Model Plant Pathogen Erwinia Chrysanthemi 3937

Erica B. Young
Biological Sciences
Phosphorus Acquisition: Exploring New Paradigms In Freshwater Phytoplankton
Co-PI: John A. Berges, Biological Sciences

Hong Yu
Health Care Administration & Information
Towards The Building Of The Next Generation Of Information Retrieval In Biology: Linking Abstract Sentences To Images
Co-PI: Joseph Bockhorst, Electrical Engineerg & Computer Science

2006

Jon Welstead
Music
Leonard Sorkin International Institute for Chamber Music (ICM)
Co-PIs: Elfin Boico, Christopher Burns; Ralph Evans; Yuri Gandelsman; Kevin Hartman; Judit Jaimes; Wolfgang Laufer; Caen Thomason-Redus; Bernard Zinck, Music

Brad Lichtenstein
Film
docUWM: Providing Documentary Services
Co-PI: Alison I. Rostankowski, Journalism/Mass Communication

Michael Liston
Philosophy
Nineteenth Century Images of Science: A Philosophical Analysis of Their Import for Current Debates

Daniel Sherman
Center for 21st Century Studies
Center for 21st Century Studies Advancement & Planning

Carmen Aguilar
WATER Institute
Impact of Filter-Feeding Bivalves in Lake Michigan: Seasonal Variation of Phytoplankton Community Structure and Gene Expression
Co-PIs: Russell L. Cuhel; Matthew L. Rise, WATER Institute

John Buntin
Biological Sciences
Hormone-Brain Interactions Involved in Parental Behavior Expression

Yi-Qiang Eric Cheng
Biological Sciences
Natural Product Discovery from Genome-Sequenced Microorganisms
Co-PI: Patrick Anderson, WATER Institute

James Cook
Chemistry
Novel GABA-A Ligands for Treating Alzheimer’s-Related Cognitive Deficits
Co-PI: Fred J. Helmstetter, Psychology

Steven Forst
Biological Sciences
Genomic Analysis of Antibiotic Genes in the Bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila

Soyoung Sue Ann Lee
Health Sciences
Speech Production of English-Korean Bilingual Children
Co-PI: Gregory K. Iverson, Foreign Languages & Linguistics

Mark McBride
Biological Sciences
Mechanism of Flavobacterium Gliding Motility

Graham Moran
Chemistry
4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase and Tyrosinemia

James Moyer Jr.
Psychology
Plasticity and Dendritic Signaling in Hippocampal Neurons as a Function of Learning and Aging
Co-PI: Fred J. Helmstetter, Psychology

Michael Muehlenbein
Anthropology
Testosterone, Energetics and Immunity: The Costs of Being Male
Co-PI: Julia Z. Bonner, Norris Health Center
Co-PI: Douglas A. Steeber, Biological Sci
Co-PI: Ann M. Swartz, Human Movement Sci

Kristian O’Connor
Health Sciences
An Innovative Diagnostic Tool for Reducing Traumatic Knee Injuries
Co-PI: Brian S R. Armstrong, Electrical Eng. & Computer Sci

Stefan Schnitzer
Biological Sciences
The Ecology and Distribution of Liana (vines) and Tree Species in Tropical Forests

Mark Schwartz
Geography
National Phenological Research Center

Dietmar Wolfram
Information Studies
Discovering Hidden User Search Patterns through Visualization of Transaction Logs
Co-PI: Jin O. Zhang, Information Studies

Ching-Hong Yang
Biological Sciences
Impact of Nanomaterials on Microbial Community in Phyllosphere: A Genome Study
Co-PI: Jin Li, Civil & Mechanical Engineering

Erica Young
Biological Sciences
Long-Term Ecological Change in a Vulnerable Wisconsin Wetland
Co-PI: Mark D. Schwartz, Geography
Co-PIs: Gretchen Meyer, James Reinartz, UWM Field Station

Dazhong Dave Zhao
Biological Sciences
Signaling of Cell Fate Determination During Sexual Reproduction

Daniel Agterberg
Physics
Theory of Electron Spins in Magnetic, Superconducting, and Spintronic Materials

Bruce Allen
Physics
Gravitational Wave Astronomy and Astrophysics
Co-PIs: Jolien D. Creighton; Marie Alesendra J. Papa; Patrick R. Brady; John L. Friedman; Leonard Parker; Alan Wiseman, Physics

Jian Chen
Chemistry
Nanoengineering Stable Carbon Nanotube Aerogels

Dyanna Czeck
Geosciences
Linking Quantitative Values of Strain and Fabrics in Naturally Deformed Rocks

Steven Dornbos
Geosciences
Shedding Light on the Cambrian Explosion

Shaoqin Sarah Gong
Mechanical Engineering
Sustainable and Eco-friendly Bio-based Polymer Composites

Prasenjit Guptasarma
Physics
Growth of Single Crystals of Materials with Highly Correlated Ground Electron States
Co-PI: Bimal K. Sarma, Physics

Sergey Kravtsov
Atmospheric Sciences
Effects of Eddies onto Decadal Variability of Large-Scale Ocean Currents and Climate

Vince Larson
Atmospheric Sciences
Global Climate and the Carbon Cycle

Paul Lyman
Physics
Atomic Layer Deposition for Production of Nanostructured Materials

Adeeb Rahman
Civil Engineering
An Engineering Approach to Improve the Assessment and Prevention of Hip Fractures in the Elderly: Initial Development of Concept and Methodology
Co-PI: Chris Papadopoulos, Civil & Mechanical Engineering
Co-PI: David Klemer, Electrical Eng & Computer Sci

Valerica Raicu
Physics
Instrument Development and Application to Quantitative Protein-Protein Interaction Studies in Vivo
Co-PI: Dilano K. Saldin, Physics

Paul Roebber
Atmospheric Science
A New Paradigm for Understanding the Seasonal Predictability of Climate
Co-PI: Chaoyang Zeng, Physics

Sara Benesh
Political Science
Supreme Court Monitoring of Lower Courts in Cases Not Formally Decided

Aaron Buseh
Nursing
Individual and Community Environment Effects on HIV Stigma in HIV-Infected African American Men
Co-PI: Patricia W. Stevens, Nursing

Dave Edyburn
Exceptional Education
Validation of Student Academic Achievement Using Technology Enhanced Performance Intervention Menus
Co-PI: Roger O. Smith, Occupational Therapy

Anthony Greene
Psychology
How Humans Learn Contextual Associations: Functional MRI Analysis
Co-PI: Fred J. Helmstetter, Psychology

Anthony Hains
Educational Psychology
Influence of Social Attributions on Type 1 and Type II Diabetes Adherence
Co-PI: William H. Davies, Psychology

Fred Helmstetter
Psychology
Imaging Memory Formation Using High-Field MRI
Co-PI: James R J. Moyer Jr, Psychology

Carol Ott
Nursing
Grief Intervention for Spouses and Adult Children of Persons with End-Stage Alzheimer’s Disease

Jennifer Peterson
Communication
Families Coping with HIV: The Impact of a Mother’s Infection
Co-PI: Lindsay M. Timmerman, Communication

Azara Santiago-Rivera
Educational Psychology
Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression in Latino Adults
Co-PI: Jonathan W. Kanter, Psychology

Kathleen Sawin
Nursing
Adaptation in Spina Bifida: A Longitudinal Study of Adolescents and Young Adults

Research and Creative Activities Support (RACAS)

(Formerly the Faculty Research and Creative Activities Support Award [FRACAS])

Deadline: December 1, 2014 at 9:00am

Description: Provides competitive support for faculty and instructional and research academic staff across the breadth of meritorious scholarship at UWM. Supported projects are expected to result in appropriate scholarly products that will increase the national and international recognition of the awardees, their programs, and the institution. Examples include publications, creative works, proposals for extramural funding and/or named fellowships, and artistic performances.

Eligibility: Have a tenure-track or tenured faculty appointment, or have an instructional or research academic staff appointment with the expectation of renewal. Additional criteria is listed in the RACAS Request for Proposals.

Award: Up to a maximum of $15,000 for individual applicants or $25,000 for two or more UWM applicants working on a project. RACAS awards cannot be used to support curriculum projects, service projects, or the development of commercial products.

Project Narrative Format: Limited to four singled-spaced pages with one-inch margins. Includes graphs, illustrations, figures, or pictures. Minimum one-inch margins. Minimum font size is 11 point in Arial, Tahoma, Times New Roman, or Georgia. Any proposal exceeding four pages will not be reviewed.

Proposal Submission: Email the completed proposal and all required attachments to kjk@uwm.edu by 9:00am on Monday, December 1, 2014.

Review Process: Complete details are provided in the RACAS Request for Proposals.

  • Stage One: The Office of Research sorts proposals into groups by topic and contacts potential internal reviewers with subject expertise for a proposal group. When possible, reviewers will be former Research Committee or FRACAS award recipients. All Stage One reviewers provide ratings and written comments.
  • Stage Two: A second, broadly representative review panel evaluates the top-rated proposals and makes funding recommendations. For both stages, reviewers remain anonymous and all reviewer feedback is anonymized before being reported back to applicants.

Award Selection: The Vice Provost for Research, Associate Vice Provost for Research, and RACAS administrator will make final funding decisions based on scores, review comments, and funding recommendations from both rounds of review.

Questions? Contact Kathleen Koch at kjk@uwm.edu or 414-229-3699.

Research and Creative Activities Support (RACAS) Award: Awardee History

2014

Bettina Arnold
Professor, Anthropology, $15,000
Subvention Funds for the Publication of “A Landscape of Ancestors: Archaeological Investigations in Two Iron Age Burial Mounds in the Hohmichele Group, Baden-Württemberg”

Christopher Burns
Associate Professor, Music, $9,943
A Sensor-Driven Generative Music Platform for Mobile Computing

George Clark
Professor, English, $14,100
The Tree of Diamond/The Hippo Hunters

Derek Counts
Associate Professor, Art History, $14,747
A Fragmented Past: (Re)Constructing Antiquity Through 3D Modeling

Carolyn Eichner
Associate Professor, History, $13,363
The Name: Legitimacy, Identity, and Gendered Citizenship in France

Margaret Fraiser
Associate Professor, Geosciences, $14,962
What Are the Controls on Ecosystem Recovery Following Global Environmental Change? A Geochemical and Paleoecological Case Study Following the End-Permian Mass Extinction

Jennifer Johung
Associate Professor, Art History, $11,367
Vital Dependencies: Biological Art, Architecture, and Life

Yevgenia Kaganovich
Professor, Art & Design, $14,309
grow

David Klingbeil
Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology, $13,311
Peer-Mediated Incremental Rehearsal for English Language Learners

Kyongboon Kwon
Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology, $14,478
The Impact of Emotional Regulation Norms and Emotional Climate of Children’s Social Network on Social Behavior: One Year Follow-Up

Christine Larson
Associate Professor, Psychology, $14,650
Predicting Who Will Get PTSD: The Role of the Neural Circuitry of Fear Extinction in the Immediate Aftermath of Trauma

Robin Mello
Associate Professor, Theatre, $12,500
Whistle Stop Adopt!

Oriol Mirosa
Assistant Professor, Sociology, $14,904
Water Poverty in American Cities

Devin Mueller
Assistant Professor, Psychology, $15,000
Cellular Contributions of Estradiol to Neural Plasticity

Jacqueline Nguyen
Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology, $24,977
Co-PI: Razia Azen, Associate Professor, Educational Psychology
Me, My Choices, and Why Study Phase II: Multidimensional Cultural Identity in Southeast Asian Adolescents

Julie Oliver
Associate Professor, Biological Sciences, $25,000
Co-PI: Doug Steeber, Associate Professor, Biological Sciences
Targeting and Destruction of Tumor and Immune Suppressor Cells in Breast Cancer

David Pate
Associate Professor, Social Work, $14,963
Understanding Low-Income Civil Litigants’ Experiences with Access to Justice Interventions

Neal Pease
Professor, History, $13,830
Remembering a Vanished World: The Jewish Revival in Poland

Changshan Wu
Professor, Geography, $14,866
Estimating Urban Impervious Surface Distribution in Wisconsin Using Spatio-Temporal Analysis

2013

Winson Chu
Assistant Professor, History
Germans, Poles, and Jews in the Making of the “Lodzermensch”: Competing Nationalisms in Poland, 1880-2009

Chris Cornelius
Associate Professor, Architecture
Radio Free Alcatraz: The Nineteen-Month American Indian Occupation of Alcatraz Island – An Architectural Speculation

Elizabeth Drame
Associate Professor, Exceptional Education
Barriers to inclusive education: A comparative study across West, East and South Africa

Scott Graham
Assistant Professor, English
Understanding the Communicative Process in FDA Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee Meetings: A Methodological Pilot

Rebecca Holderness
Associate Professor, Theatre
The Garfield Play

Chris Lawson
Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology
The inductive privilege of large samples: Exploring the contextual and cognitive factors responsible for children’s adherence to the law of large samples

Richard Leson
Assistant Professor, Art History
The Material Life of Jeanne of Flanders

Joseph Mougel
Assistant Professor, Art & Design
From Silver Crystals to Landscape Pixels

Susana Munoz
Assistant Professor, Administrative Leadership
Creating Counterspaces of Resistance and Sanctuaries of Learning and Teaching: An Analysis of Freedom University

Mark Netzloff
Associate Professor, English
Extraterritorial Sovereignties: English State Agents in Early Modern Europe

Michael Newman
Assistant Professor, Journalism, Advertising & Media Studies
Play TV: Early Video Games in the Home

Richard Popp
Assistant Professor, Journalism, Advertising & Media Studies
Direct Marketing, Communication Systems, and the Making of American Media Consumerism, 1865-2000

Rafael Rodriguez
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Miniaturization and behavioral capabilities

Aaron Schutz
Professor, Educational Policy and Community Studies
Beyond the Current Canon in Community Organizing

Manu Sobti
Associate Professor, Architecture
The Sliver of the Oxus Borderland: Medieval Cultural Encounters between the Arabs and Persians

Nathaniel Stern
Associate Professor, Art & Design
Rippling Images: undersea, performative, digital printmaking

Daniel Vyleta
Assistant Professor, Foreign Languages and Literature
Nazi Criminal Justice and Jews: The Walter Pick Trial

Jinsung Wang
Assistant Professor, Kinesiology
Hemispheric motor lateralization in active and sedentary older adults

Jun Zhang
Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Information Extraction from Free Text Patient Medical Reports for Breast Cancer Patient Care

2012

Mary Jo Baisch
Associate Professor, Nursing
Bearing the Burden: Identifying Attributes of Allostatic Load in African American Women in An Electronic Health System

Anne Bonds
Assistant Professor, Geography
Enduring Incarceration: Gender, Race, and Post-Incarceration Geographies Survival in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Xiaoxia Cao
Assistant Professor, Journalism & Mass Communication
Bridging the Distance: The Effect of Media Messages About Human Suffering on Help for People in Need From Another Country

David Divalerio
Assistant Professor, History
The Legacy of the Madman of ü (1458-1532) Through Oral Traditions

Christine Evans
Assistant Professor, History
Between Truth and Time: A History of Soviet Television

Clark Evans
Assistant Professor, Mathematical Sciences
An Assessment of Thunderstorm Development Forecast Successes and Failures From Very High Resolution Numerical Weather Forecasts

Marcus Filippello
Assistant Professor, History
Crossing the “Black Earth”: Roads, Environmental Change, and Communal Consciousness in An African Forest Community

Nicholas Fleisher
Assistant Professor, Linguistics
The Semantics of Adjectives in the ‘Tough’ Construction

Frankie Flood
Associate Professor, Art & Design
Digital Craft Research: Data, Process, and Material

Kimberly Hassell
Associate Professor, Criminal Justice
Co-PI: Tina Freiburger Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice
Outcome and Process Evaluation of Police Decision-Making in Sexual Assault Cases

John Heilmann
Assistant Professor, Communication Sciences & Disorders
Developing Linguistic Profiles of Children with Language Impairment

Rene Izquierdo
Assistant Professor, Music
Advancing Chamber Music for Classical Guitar

Benjamin Johnson
Associate Professor, History
Escaping the Dark, Gray City: How Conservation Re-Made City, Suburb, and Countryside in the Progressive Era

Rohit Kate
Assistant Professor, Health Informatics & Administration
Extracting Evidence-Based Practical Guidelines for Laser Phototherapy From Meta-Analysis Data

Elana Levine
Associate Professor, Journalism & Mass Communication
Constructing Femininity in Soap Opera History

Marcellus Merritt
Assistant Professor, Psychology
A Tailored Stress Management Intervention for Reduced Day and Nighttime Blood Pressure in Young Pre-Hypertensive Adults

Lisa Moline
Associate Professor, Art & Design
The Sideways OED, Memory Palaces and Other Stories: Experimental Interactive Narratives for the Internet

Joe Peschio
Assistant Professor, Foreign Languages & Literature
Russian Literary Censorship 1801-28: Preliminary Analysis of Russian Archival Holdings

Sandra Pucci
Associate Professor, Linguistics
Instructed Heritage Language Speakers

Chia Vang
Associate Professor, History
A View of War From Below: History and Memory Among Ethnic Minorities in Laos During and After the Vietnam War

Ying-Chih Wang
Assistant Professor, Occupational Science and Technology
Co-PI: Jay Kapellusch, Assistant Professor, Occupational Science and Technology
Removing Air Bubbles Generated in the IV Lines During the Intravenous Cancer Therapy

Erin Winkler
Assistant Professor, Africology
Racism As a Threshold Topic: Assessing Student Learning Outcomes in a University Diversity Requirement Course

Zengwang Xu
Assistant Professor, Geography
Identifing Potential Epidemic Pathways in the US Intercity Air Transportation Network

2011

Nidal Abu-Zahra
Associate Professor, Materials Engineering
Graphene Based, Ultra-Efficient, Low Cost Polymer Solar Cells

David Allen
Associate Professor, Journalism & Mass Communication
Spatial Frameworks and Dissent: The Use of Place in the Management of Expression in the U.S.

Elisabetta Cova
Assistant Professor, Foreign Languages & Literature
Space, Function and Social Practice in the Roman Houses of Pompeii

W Hobart Davies
Professor, Psychology
Empirical Examination of Effects of Recruitment Approach on External Validity

Janis Eells
Professor, Health Sciences
Photobiomodulation for the Treatment of Retinal Degenerative Disease

Uk Heo
Professor, Political Science
South Korea’s Rise in World Affairs: Power, Economic Development, and Foreign Policy

Lingquian Ivy Hu
Assistant Professor, Urban Planning
Beyond Inner Cities: A Comparative Study of the Spatial Mismatch in Chicago and Los Angeles

Jason Christopher Jones
Assistant Professor, Foreign Languages & Literature
Remaking Japan: American Remakes of Japanese Film

N Kundan Kishor
Assistant Professor, Economics
Has Housing Market Wealth Effect Increased Over Time?

Simonetta Konewko
Assistant Professor, FICL
Neorealism and Models of Compassion

Josepha Lanters
Professor, English
The Theatrical Oeuvre of Thomas Kilroy: The Art of Imperfection

Barbara Ley
Associate Professor, Journalism & Mass Communication
The Transmediated Culture of Online Pregnancy Support

Colleen Ludwig
Assistant Professor, Art & Design
Elemental Bodies: A Series of Four Immersive Environments with Sensor Control

Genevieve Mcbride
Associate Professor, History
Front Page Backstory: A Woman Journalist in ‘Jazz Age’ Chicago And
‘Dear Mrs. Griggs': Readers Pouring Out Their Hearts in the Heartland

Kristen Murphy
Assistant Professor, Chemistry & Biochemistry
Why Students Struggle with Scale Literacy: Identifying Analytical Reasoning Versus Heuristic Processing in Scaling Tasks

Blain Neufeld
Assistant Professor, Philosophy
Civic Respect, Political Legitimacy, and Citizenship Education

Markeda Newel
Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology
Using Computer-Simulation to Analyze Problem-Solving Consultation in a Racially Diverse School Context

Terrance Newell
Assistant Professor, Information Studies
Examining the Effectiveness of Two Digital Learning Simulations in Increasing Students’ Scientific Problem-Solving Skills

Hanyong Park
Assistant Professor, Linguistics
English Influence on Korean Consonant Category Change

Diana Reddy
Professor, Psychology
Increasing Vaccination for Human Papillomavirus in Economically Disadvantaged Girls and Boys

Caroline Seymour-Jorn
Associate Professor, FICL
Translating Memory and War: Ebtithal Salem’s “A Small Box in the Heart

Heeju Shin
Assistant Professor, Sociology
Increase of Urban-Rural Disparities in Child Health in Peru Between 1991 and 2008

Robert Smith
Associate Professor, History
Battling Racial Colonialism with Legal Activism; Transnational Cooperation Within the Human Rights Bar

Michael Tofias
Assistant Professor, Political Science
For the Folks Back Home: Accountability and Representation in the United States Senate

Ricardo Vasconcelos
Assistant Professor, Spanish & Portuguese
Completion of the Book Manuscript “Who’s Afraid of Anthologies? Anthologies of Twentieth-Century Portuguese and Brazilian Poetry in the Portuguese

Ying Wang
Associate Professor, Art History
White Gold: Art and Salt in Yangzhou, 1700-1800

Carla Wiggins
Associate Professor, Health Sciences
The Use of Health Information Technology in Ambulatory Surgery Centers in Wisconsin

Chantel Wright
Assistant Professor, Foreign Languages and Literature
A Book-Length History of German Gastarbeiterliteratur (Guest Worker Literature) 1955-1990

2010

Joe Austin
Associate Professor, History
Before “Urban Youth”: African American Youth and U.S. Central Cities, 1940-1970

Carla Bagnoli
Professor, Philosophy
A Puzzle About the Authority of Moral Norms

Rachel Ida Buff
Associate Professor, History
Deportation and the Evolution of Immigrant Rights in the U.S., 1935-65

P Shawn Cahill
Assistant Professor, Psychology
The Effects of Rape-Prevention Education on Threat Detection: Tests of Short-Term Acquisition and Long-Term Retention

Noelle Chesley
Assistant Professor, Sociology
Technology Use & Work-Family Processes: Impacts on Psychological Well- Being

Garry W. Davis
Associate Professor, Foreign Language and Literature
Empirical Research on the ‘Interlanguage’ of Immersion Learners

L Raquel Farmer-Hinton
Associate Ed. Policy & Communication Studies
Going to College: Exploring Key Supports and Resources in Urban Schools for Students’ Preparation for College

Kathryn Fonner
Assistant Professor, Communication
I’m Working Here!” Linking Teleworkers’ Boundary Management Strategies to Work-Life Balance, Role Identity, and Stress

Elena Gorfinkel
Assistant Professor, Art History
Indecent Desires, Obsolete Bodies: Sexpoitation Cinema, 1960s Film Culture and the Adult Film Audience

Jean Hudson
Associate Professor, Anthropology
Transitions At Gramalote: Evaluation of Coastal Contributions During the Initial Period in the Moche Valley of Peru

Jeri-Anne Lyons
Associate Professor, Health Sciences
Therapeutic Efficancy of NIR Photobiomodulation in An Animal Model of Multiple Sclerosis

T Dean Nardelli
Assistant Professor, Health Sciences
Identification of T Helper Type 17 Cells in the Development of Lyme Arthritis

Timothy B. Patrick
Associate Professor, Health Sciences
Developing a Measure of the Accuracy of the Translation of Research Into Practice

David Pritchard
Professor, Journalism and Mass Communication
Adapting Press Law to the Realities of the Digital Age: An Empirical Study of Legal Change in Trial Courts

Marcelino Stuhmer
Assistant Professor, Visual Art
Dissecting Identity: Recreating a 17th Century Anatomy Theater to Function As An Alternative Performance and Exhibition Space

Anika Wilson
Assistant Professor, Africology
Strange Bedfellows: International Human Rights Law, Customary Courts, and the Marital Disputes of Malawian Women

2009

Sukanya Banerjee
Associate Professor, English
Loyalty and the Making of the Modern Subject, 1858-1905

Gregory T. Carter
Assistant Professor, History
Wendell Phillips: Unapologetic Abolitionist, Unreformed Amalgamationist

Bruce Charlesworth
Assistant Professor, Film
Retraction

Woonsup Choi
Assistant Professor, Geography
Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Urban Climate in Wisconsin and Minnesota

Stephen C. Cobb
Assistant Professor, Human Movement Sciences
Novel Multi-Segment Foot Model Based on In-Vivo and In-Vitro Stereophotogrammetric Studies and Clinical Theories of Foot Function.

Luca Ferrero
Assistant Professor, Philosophy
Shared Actions, Individual Agency, and the Unity of Plural Subjects

Marcia A. Firmani
Assistant Professor, Health Sciences
Fitness Cost of Multiple-Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

Rina Ghose
Associate Professor, Geography
Investigating Citizen Participation in Privatized Collaborative Planning in Inner-City Milwaukee

Leslie Harris
Assistant Professor, Communication
Holy Matrimony, Sacred Covenant, and Legal Union: Marriage and Its Deviations in the Nineteenth-Century United States

Yevgeniya Kaganovich
Associate Professor, Visual Art
Body: Subject and Site

Maria Del Pilar Melgarejo-Acosta
Assistant Professor, Spanish and Portuguese
Language of Regeneration: The Production of Political Discourse in Colombia and Mexico

Nathaniel Stern
Assistant Professor, Visual Art
Embodiment and Minimalism in Internet-Based Art

Jennifer Watson
Associate Professor, Foreign Languages and Linguistics
Wild One: A Biography of Selma Lagerlöf

Changshan Wu
Associate Professor, Geography
Mapping Urban Impervious Surfaces Using IKONOS Imagery: An Integrated Approach

Kathryn Zalewski
Assistant Professor, Human Movement Sciences
Ability-Based Rehabilitation: A Case-Series Exploring Stroke Recovery in the United States

Mo (Maureen) Zell
Assistant Professor, Architecture
New Parking Paradigm: Re-Think, Re-Zone, Re-Use

2008

Lisa Berger
Assistant Professor, Social Work
Social Worker and Physician Administered Brief Alcohol Intervention for Hospitalized Patients

Winson W. Chu
Assistant Professor, History
Polish, German, Or Jewish? The “Lodzer Mensch” and the Politics of Multi-Ethnicity in Twentieth-Century Poland

Christopher A. De Sousa
Associate Professor, Geography
Residential Brownfields Development, Sprawl, and Sustainability: A Demand Side Perspective

Frankie Flood
Assistant Professor, Visual Art
Rapid Prototyping and D Scanning in the Production of Art

Ryan Holifield
Assistant Professor, Geography
Environmental Justice and the Cleanup of Contaminated Urban Rivers: A Comparative Study of Areas of Concern in the Lake Michigan Basin

Nan Y. Kim-Paik
Assistant Professor, History
Families of the Wartime Missing and the Return of the Korean War’s Presumed Dead in 21st-Century South Korea

Anna Mansson Mcginty
Assistant Professor, Geography and Women’s Studies
Gender Identity and Activism Among Muslim Women in the Midwest

Lori Neighbors
Assistant Professor, Human Movement Sciences
To Weigh Or Not to Weigh: The Demography, Epidemiology, and Qualitative Experience of Body Weight Monitoring for Weight Control

Susan Partington
Assistant Professor, Health Sciences
An Investigation of the Relationship Between the Prenatal Environment and Childhood Obesity

Joe Peschio
Assistant Professor, Foreign Languages and Linguistics
The Green Lamp

Arijit H. Sen
Assistant Professor, Architecture
Collaborative Politics of the Contact Zone: White Women in the San Francisco Hindu Temple

Jason Sherman
Assistant Professor, Anthropology
The Margarita Settlement Survey: Ancient Maya Rural Settlement in South-Central Quintana Roo, Mexico

Julia A. Snethen
Assistant Professor, Nursing
Influence of Familial Environment and Decision-Making Patterns on Childhood Obesity

Natasha Borges Sugiyama
Assistant Professor, Political Science
The Politics of Social Policy Diffusion in Brazil

Kristin M. Sziarto
Assistant Professor, Geography
The Scales of Immigrant Regulation and Resistance: A Comparative Study

Tanya J. Tiffany
Assistant Professor, Art History
Diego Velázquez’s Early Paintings and the Culture of Seventeenth-Century Seville

Laura Trafi-Prats
Assistant Professor, Visual Art
A Narrative Study of Elementary Children’s Aesthetic Perspectives of Urban Environment and Change

2007

Christine Calynn T. Cheng
Assistant Professor, Computer Science
Algorithmic and Complexity Issues of Sudoku.

Jennifer Suzanne Hruska
Assistant Professor, Mathematical Sciences
The Dynamics of Polynomial Skew Products in Two Complex Variables.

Tae Youn Kim
Assistant Professor, Nursing
Using Electronic Patient Records to Measure Pressure Ulcer Prevalence.

Soyoung Lee
Assistant Professor, Communication Sciences and Disorders
Phonological Awareness and Nonsense Word Production in Bilingual Children.

Jin Li
Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering and Mechanics
Impact of Surface Properties on the Transport of Microbial Pollutants in Prous Media.

Aims Mcguinness
Assistant Professor, History
Rights of Time: Labor, the Working Day, Childhood, and Aging in the United States and Mexico, 1880-Present.

Katie E. Mosack
Assistant Professor, Psychology
Older Russian Immigrant Women’s Health Beliefs and the Treatment of Hypertension.

Jason Puskar
Assistant Professor, English
Underwriting the Accident: Narratives of American Chance, 1871-1935.

Jenifer J. Runquist
Assistant Professor, Nursing
A Pilot Investigation of Fatigue After Childbirth in a Vulnerable Community.

Caorline Seymour-Jorn
Assistant Professor, French, Italian, and Comparative Literature
Cultural Criticism in Egyptian Women’s Writing.

Lisa Silverman
Assistant Professor, History
Theater, Photography, and Austrian Jewish Cultural History: Max Reinhardt (1873-1943) and Dora Kallmus (1881-1963).

Michael Tofias
Assistant Professor, Political Science
Understanding Asymmetry in the Colonel Blotto Game.

Catherine Vanderboom
Assistant Professor, Nursing
Identification of Rescue Activities Provided to Home Healthcare Patients.

Florence Vatan
Assistant Professor, French, Italian, and Comparative Literature
Mastering Sensibility: The Aesthetics of Flaubert and Baudelaire in Light of Contemporary Medical Conceptions.

Erin N. Winkler
Assistant Professor, Africology
I Learn About Being Black Everywhere I Go”: The Racial Socialization of African-American Children.

Hong Yu
Assistant Professor, Health Sciences
Effectively Determining the Information Needs From Ad Hoc Clinical Questions Posed for Question Answering.

2006

Michael Brondino
Assistant Professor, Social Work
Development of a Content Specific Reading Test to Link Test Readability to Respondent Ability.

Noelle Chesley
Assistant Professor, Sociology
Contextualizing Care: Informal Elder Care, Employment, and Caregiver Health and Well-Being.

Edward Hinchman
Assistant Professor, Philosophy
Evil and the Limits of Responsibility.

Rebecca Holderness
Assistant Professor, Theatre
A Mixed Media Performance
The Observation of Miss Julie.

Wooseob Jeong
Assistant Professor, Information Studies
Touchable Online Text and Image Display for Blind People.

Catherine Anne Johnson
Assistant Professor, Information Studies
Investigating the Social Capital of Public Libraries.

Erin Kaheny Olsen
Assistant Professor, Political Science
An Investigation of Circuit Judge Gatekeeping Behavior in Administrative Agency Appeals.

Bonita Klein-Tasman
Assistant Professor, Psychology
Early Autism Phenotype: Head Circumference Growth and Emerging Executive Functioning.

Christina Mararnci
Associate Professor, Art History
The Geometry of Power.

Sandra Martell
Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology
Field Trips to Museums and Student Learning: What Does the Data Tell Us?

J. Carson Smith
Assistant Professor, Human Movement Sciences
Exercise As a Treatment for Depression in Older Adults: Effects on Emotional Reactivity and Brain Function.

Richard Tierney
Assistant Professor, Philosophy
Aristotle’s Concept of Nature.

Luc Vanier
Assistant Professor, Dance
The “E’s of Water”.

Andrea Westlund
Assistant Professor, Philosophy
Care and the Self.

Jeb Willenbring
Assistant Professor, Mathematical Sciences
Mathematical Problems in Quantum Computation.

Bo Zhang
Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology
Examining the Value of Group Grades in Assessing Student Achievement.

Huimin Zhao
Assistant Professor, Business
Intelligent Symptom-Based Retrieval of Electronic Medical Records.

2005

Daniel Agterberg
Assistant Professor, Physics
Dynamics of Unconventional Superconductors.

Ellen J. Amster
Assistant Professor, History
City of Saints: Political Organization, Geography and Urban History in Fes, Morocco.

Joe Austin
Assistant Professor, History
Global Undergrounds: Graffiti Artists, Goths, and Print-Zines Across National Boundaries, 1980-Present.

Jay J. Bauer
Assistant Professor, Communication Sciences & Disorders
Voice F0 Responses Elicited By Perturbations in Pitch of Auditory Feedback in Individuals That Stutter and Controls.

Rachel Ida Buff
Assistant Professor, History.
Conjugal Policy: Occupying Asian America, 1945-1975.

Kuang-Chi Chang
Assistant Professor, Sociology
The Social Logic Behind “Offshoring” in the Asian Market: Moving Business and Social Networks Into China.

Steven Q. Dornbos
Assistant Professor, Geosciences
Paleocology and Paleoenvironmental Setting of the Early Cambrian Chengjiang Fauna of China: An Early View of the Cambrian Explosion.

Caryn S. Easterling
Assistant Professor, Communication Sciences & Disorders
Effectiveness of Electrical Stimulation on Swallowing in Children with Neurologic Impairment with Chronic Dysphagia.

Laura Fingerson
Assistant Professor, Sociology
Food and Physical Activity in Teen Peer Cultures.

Carlos R. Galvao-Sobrinho
Assistant Professor, History
Burial Rites, Funerary Sociability, and Sense of Self Among Slaves and Freed Persons At Rome in the Early Principate.

Prasenjit Guptasarma
Assistant Professor, Physics
Probing Correlated Electron Spins in New Magnetoelectric Materials.

Tracey Heatherington
Assistant Professor, Anthropology
Environmetalist Identities in the New Europe: Sardinian Forest Rangers.

Yevgeniya Kaganovich
Assistant Professor, Visual Art
Adornment As Extension of the Body.

Jonathan W. Kanter
Assistant Professor, Psychology
Mechanisms of Change in Psychotherapy for Depression.

Sergei V. Kuchin
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Assessment of Std1 and Related Proteins As New Molecular Targets for Safe Antifungal Therapy.

Jeri-Annette Lyons
Assistant Professor, Health Sciences
B Lymphocyte Migration and Maturation During a Multiple-Sclerosis-Like Disease in Mice.

Robin Mello
Assistant Professor, Theatre
Stages for Learning: History and Practice of Theatre Education in Public Schools.

bJames R. Moyer
Assistant Professor, Psychology
Evaluation of a Novel Treatment for Aging-Related Cognitive Decline.

Michael P. Muehlenbein
Assistant Professor, Anthropology
Effects of Testosterone Supplementation on the Immune Functions of Obese Men and HIV-Infected Men.

Mark Netzloff
Assistant Professor, English
Before the Grand Tour: English Travel and Migration in Early Modern Europe, 1570-1640.

Kristian Matthew O’Connor
Assistant Professor, Human Movement Sciences
Do Clinical Functional Tests Predict Knee Joint Mechanics During Play?

Mat Rappaport
Assistant Professor, Visual Art
Presences: An Interactive Video Installation.

Stefan Schnitzer
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Quantifying Long-Term, Large-Scale Changes in Temperate Forest Plant Communities.

Douglas A. Steeber
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Defining the Role of Adhesion Molecules in Lymphocyte Migration and the Generation of Protective Immunity.

Kyle Talbott
Assistant Professor, Architecture
A Computer-Aided Architectural Design Method to Augment Creativity.

Hani H.Titi
Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering & Mechanics
Mechanistic/Numerical Methodology for Improved Performance of Highway Pavements.

Jorg C. Woehl
Assistant Professor, Chemistry
Development of Novel, High Performance Fiber Probes for the Optical Imaging of Single Molecules on Surfaces.

Changshan Wu
Assistant Professor, Geography
Understanding Lyme Disease and Environmental Relationships in Wisconsin – a Remote Sensing and GIS Approach.

Yaoying Xu
Assistant Professor, Exceptional Education
The Effect of Empowering Families of Premature Infants Through Linked Assessment and Intervention on Caregiver-Infant Interactions.

2004

Scott Adams
Assistant Professor, Economics
The Health Insurance-Wage Tradeoff.

Jasmine Alinder
Assistant Professor, History
Left Living: Frank P. Zeidler and Milwaukee’s Socialist Legacy.

Dyanna Czeck
Assistant Professor, Geosciences
When Tectonic Plates Collide: Predicting Strain for Rocks Under Stress.

Scott Drewianka
Assistant Professor, Economics
Causes of Trends in Family Structure: An International Comparison.

Kyle Ebersole
Assistant Professor, Human Movement Sciences
Determinants of Performance During Functional Knee Joint Stability Exercises in Soccer Players.

Christina Ewig
Assistant Professor, Political Science
Is Neoliberalism Bad for Women? Peru and the Politics of Health Reform in Latin America.

Luca Ferrero
Assistant Professor, Philosophy
Decisions for Future Action and Personal Identity.

Judith Franzak
Assistant Professor, English
Struggling Middle School Readers Transition to High School: A Study of Policy in Context.

Bryan Kennedy
Assistant Professor, Spanish and Portuguese
Understanding the Culture of the Brazilian Favela.

Lian Li
Associate Professor, Physics
Atomic Scale Studies of Magnetism in Magnetic Semiconductorsby Spin-Polarized Scanning Tunneling Microscope.

Christopher Papadopoulos
Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering and Mechanics
Understanding and Predicting the Performance and Failure of Optimal Structures.

Adeeb Rahman
Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering and Mechanics
Low-Weight and Low-Stiffness Cellular Metal Alloys for Human Joint Implants and As Bone Replacement.

Joel Rast
Assistant Professor, Political Science
Curbing Industrial Decline Or Thwarting Redevelopment? An Evaluation of Chicago’s Planned Manufacturing Districts.

Gillian Rodger
Assistant Professor, Music
The Early History of American Vaudeville, 1850-1880.

Scott Strath
Assistant Professor, Human Movement Sciences
Enhancing Physical Activity Motivation in Older Adults.

Rodney Swain
Associate Professor, Psychology
Angiogenesis/Neurogenesis Inhibition and Learning.

Ann Swartz
Assistant Professor, Human Movement Sciences
Determinants of Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Sensitivity in Older Adults.

Min Wu
Assistant Professor, Health Sciences
Tele-Educational System for Dental Residents Interpreting Oral Cancer Images.

Darci Wutz
Assistant Professor, Dance
Broadway Dances: A Journey Through Time.

Jian Xu
Assistant Professor, French, Italian, and Comparative Literature
Suffering, Representation, and Critical Positioning in China’s Postsocialist Literature and Film.

Vladislav Yakovlev
Associate Professor, Physics
When Dreams Come True: Nanoscopic Non-Invasive Imaging of Living Cells.

Ching-Hong Yang
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Genome-Wide Identification of Virulence Genes in Erwinia Chrysanthemi 3937.

2003

Rene Antrop-Gonzalez
Assistant Professor, Education Curriculum and Instruction
Factors That Latina/O Urban Alternative High School Students Attribute to Their High Academic Achievement and Resiliency.

Razia Azen
Assistant Professor, Education Educational Psychology
Relative Importance of Correlated Predictor Variables: Inference with Dominance Analysis.

Sukanya Banerjee
Assistant Professor, English
Imperial Diasporas and the Politics of Nation-Space: Colonial Identities and Metropolitan Englishness.

John A. Berges
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Mortality in Freshwater Phytoplankton.

Kimberly J. Cosier
Assistant Professor, Visual Art
Matters of Concern for At-Risk High School Students in Art Classrooms and Beyond.

Jennifer E. Earl
Assistant Professor, Human Movement Science
Relationships Among Gender, Dynamic Malalignment, and Lower Extremity Injury.

Simone Ferro
Assistant Professor, Theatre and Dance
Dance Research Performance Called “Ear-Walking Woman.

Jill Ann Holman
Assistant Professor, Economics
Alternative Methods of Financing Productive Government Expenditures in An Open Economy.

Susanne Jones
Assistant Professor, Communication
Socio-Psychological and Cultural Variations in the Experience and Expression of Emotional Labor.

William P. Jones
Assistant Professor, History
Dispatches From the War Within: An Anne Braden Reader.

Andrew Kincaid
Assistant Professor, English
Holding the Center: The Geographies of Consolidation and the Emergence of Postcolonial Dublin.

Jin Li
Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering and Mechanics
Effect of Biological Filters and the Removal of Biological Warfare Agents.

Shelley Lund
Assistant Professor, Communication Sciences and Disorders
The Effect of Augmented Input on the Development of Grammar By Children Who Use Augmentative and Alternative . . .

Linda Mccarthy
Assistant Professor, Geography
Milwaukee’s Brownfields: Redevelopment and Environmental Equity?

Rebecca Neumann
Assistant Professor, Economics
Sequencing of Domestic Financial Market Development and International Capital Market Liberalization.

Sandra K. Plach
Assistant Professor, Nursing
Anxiety, Depression, and Positive Functioning in Women with Heart Failure: Can Social Roles Make a Difference?

Steven B. Redd
Assistant Professor, Political Science
Terrorism and Foreign Policy Decision Making: Including Emotions in the Calculus.

Robert O. Self
Assistant Professor, History
Century Interrupted: 1968 in American History and the International Imagination.

Hanh Q. Trinh
Associate Professor, Health Sciences
Strategic Response of Urban Hospitals to the Managed Care Market.

Michael Weinert
Professor, Physics
Electronic Properties of Oxide Nanostructure Interfaces.

Dexuan Xie
Assistant Professor, Mathematical Sciences
A Fast Algorithm for Visualizing Structure-Activity Relationships of Large-Scale Chemical Databases.

Erica B. Young
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Nutrient Induced Chlorophyll a Fluorescence Transients As a Diagnostic of Nutrient Limitation in Freshwater Microalgae.

2002

Alison Alter
Assistant Professor, Political Science
Economic Expectations and Elections.

Anthony A. Azenabor
Assistant Professor, Allied Health Health Sciences
Chlamydia Pneumoniae Infection Modulates Lipoprotein Lipase Activity, Enhances LDL Modification and Contributes to . . .

Robert Burlage
Assistant Professor, Health Sciences
Isolation of Genes From a Toxic Fungus.

Aaron G. Buseh
Assistant Professor, Health Maintenance
Stigma Experienced By Women Living with HIV/AIDS Along the Wellness-Illness Continuum.

Barry I. Cameron
Assistant Professor, Geosciences
The Tempestuous Relationship Between Volcanoes and Glaciers.

Wonshik Chee
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Online Monitoring of Gear Degradation for Automatic Control Systems.

Dave Clark
Assistant Professor, English
Collectivist Individuals: Open-Source Software Communities and the Politics of Technology.

George Clark
Assistant Professor, English
Ropa Rimwe: A Novel in Progress.

Robert J. Eger
Assistant Professor, Political Science
Smart Economic Development: A Performance Study of Tax Incremental Financing (TIF) in Wisconsin.

Anthony J. Greene
Assistant Professor, Psychology
The Organization of Inferential Learning and Declarative Memory: Amnesia and the Transitive Inference Task.

Michael Greenwald
Assistant Professor, Urban Planning
Sitting on Top of the World: The Application of Recently Acquired Orbital Imagery for Land Use and Water . . .

Eun-Ok Im
Assistant Professor, Nursing Health Maintenance
An Internet Survey Study on Menopausal Symptoms Among Asian Women From Six Ethnic Groups.

Bonita P. Klein-Tasman
Assistant Professor, Psychology
Behavioral Characteristics of Children with Williams Syndrome in a Standardized Context: Performance on the . . .

Vincent Larson
Assistant Professor, Mathematical Sciences
Clouds and Forecasts of Weather and Climate.

Steven Mckay
Assistant Professor, Sociology
Globalization Afloat: The Making of Filipino Seafarers.

Christine Miller
Assistant Professor, Nursing Health Restoration
Heart Disease Symptoms and Risk Factors in Black Women.

Graham Moran
Assistant Professor, Chemistry
New Approaches to Therapeutics From First Principles.

Meredith Root
Assistant Professor, Film
The Theatre of the Small.

Ying Wang
Assistant Professor, Art History
Silk, Power, and Gender in Shang China.

Chaoyang Zeng
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Searching the Genes That Orchestrate the Neuronal Cell Fate Determination and Differentiation in the Drosophila . . .

2001

Daniel F. Agterberg
Assistant Professor, Physics, $14,272.00
Symmetry-Based Theories of Unconventional Superconductors

Margo Anderson
Professor, History, $4,130.00
The Proper Role of Population Data Systems in Time of War

Mark P. Bradley
Assistant Professor, History, $14,976.00
Becoming International: A History of Transnational Passions in the Twentieth Century

Dale N. Buechler
Assistant Professor, Elec. Eng. & Comp Sci, $14,777.00
Evaluation of Impedance Measurement Techniques for the Characterization of Highly Localized Regions of Tissue

Christopher A. Desousa
Assistant Professor, Geography, $12,829.00
Converting Urban Brownfields Into Green Spaces

Joan D. Dobkin
Assistant Professor, Visual Art, Arts & Humanities, $10,730.00
Public Art to Promote Public Discourse: An Examination of Welfare Reform in the Urban Environment

Kathleen Dolan
Associate Professor, Political Science, $5,833.00
Voting for Women in the United States

Nancy File
Assistant Professor, Curriculum & Instruction, $8,049.00
Teacher/Child Interaction and Peer Competence in Early Childhood Classrooms

Christopher J. Guse
Assistant Professor, Theatre and Dance, $14,700.00
Research Design, Development and Implementation of Technical Production Elements of the Play “The Berlin Circle” . . .

Robert M. Hessling
Assistant Professor, Psychology, $14,980.00
Does Explanatory Style Affect the Perception of Support in Romantic Relationships?

Jean Hudson
Assistant Professor, Anthropology, $14,914.00
The Ethnography and Archaeology of Traditional Peruvian Reed Boat Fishing Communities

Teresa S. Johnson
Assistant Professor, Health Maintenance, $14,993.00
Breast Feeding Education and Support Home Visit Program

Rhonda K. Kowalchuk
Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology, $5,349.00
The Analysis of Repeated Measurements with Mixed-Model Adjusted F-Tests

Mark Netzloff
Assistant Professor, English, $5,350.00
England’s Internal Colonies: Class Relations, Capital Formation, and the Literature of English Colonialism . . .

A. Andrew Pacheco
Assistant Professor, Chemistry, $14,763.00
A Biochemical Investigation of Nitrification

Dawn H.S. Reinemann
Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology, $12,746.00
Project P.R.I.D.E.: Promoting Resiliency in Diverse Environments

Lisa N. Samuels
Assistant Professor, English, $9,266.00
Modernism Is Not Enough: Shaped Readings for New Writings

Lori Settersten
Assistant Professor, Health Maintenance
Critical Thinking and Participation in Health Behaviors, $14,998.00

Ting-Ruei Shiu
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, $14,999.00
A Numerical Study of Micromachining of Glassy Materials with Nanosecond Laser Pulses At Different Wavelengths

Habib Tabatabai
Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering & Mechanics, $15,000.00
A New Method for Damage Detection in Advanced Composite Structures

Virginia Van Dyke
Assistant Professor, Political Science, $8,805.00
Caste, Religion and “Reconversions” in Indian Politics: Hindu Nationalism Confronts Ethnic Mobilization

Linda A. Whittingham
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences, $13,055.00
Are There Benefits to Mating Promiscuously for Female Birds?

Hong (Iris) Xie
Assistant Professor, Library & Information Science, $14,426.00
Supporting Shifts of Information Seeking Strategies in Corporate Settings At Digital Age: Implications for . . .

2000

Keith A. Bender
Assistant Professor, Economics
Socio-Economic Factors and Health Status of the Elderly:A Comparative Analysis

Avik Chakrabarti
Assistant Professor, Economics
Taxes and Foreign Direct Investment: U.S. Multinationals in Europe

Kyoung Ae Cho
Assistant Professor, Visual Art
Accumulation / Pattern in Nature

Peter O. Dunn
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Conservation Genetics of the Threatened Prairie Chicken

Anne R. Hansen
Assistant Professor, Anthropology
Suffering and the Prophetic Past and Future in Cambodian Religion and Society: A Study of the Buddha Damnay

Sam Helwany
Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering & Mechanics
Estimating Pile Set-Up

Eugenie Hildebrandt
Assistant Professor, Health Maintenance
Exploringsystem and Personal Barriers to Success in the Wisconsin Workfare (W-2) Program

Kyu-Jung Kim
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Development of Three Dimensional Computer Models of the Hand/Forearm Complex Using a New Fuzzy Reasoning Technique

Grace E. La
Assistant Professor, Architecture
The Aperture Analyzed: Reconciliation of Built Form and Context Through the Design of Openings

Lian Li
Assistant Professor, Physics
Understand the Art of Compound Semiconductor Epitaxy

Tasha G. Oren
Assistant Professor, Journalism & Mass Communication
Signal Crossing: Television, Media Policy, and the Formation of Israeli National Culture

Elizabeth A. Skowron
Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology
Stochastic Process Analysis of Parent-Child Communication Patterns in Stress-Affected Versus Stress-Resistant

Douglas W. Woods
Assistant Professor, Psychology
Development and Evaluation of a Treatment for Vocal Tic Disorder

Vladislav Yakovlev
Assistant Professor, Physics
Frontiers of Laser Surgery

1999

Nidal Abu-Zahra
Assistant Professor, Industrial & Systems Engineering, $12,296
Developing An Expert System to Predict Early Tool Failure in Machining Operations Using Ultrasound Waves

Joseph H. Aldstadt
Assistant Professor, Chemistry, $12,499
Study of the Chemical Speciation of Arsenic in Green Bay By Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Synchrotron X-Ray

Bettina Arnold
Assistant Professor, Anthropology, $12,450
A Landscape of Ancestors:, Early Iron Age Social Organization & Regional Interaction in Southwest Germany

Phoebe Crisman
Assistant Professor, Architecture, $11,954
Regeneration of the Post-Industrial Urban Landscape: Potentials and Strategies for Design

W. Hobart Davies
Assistant Professor, Psychology, $12,274
Affect, Behavior, and Interaction in Forensic Interviews for Child Sexual Abuse

Christopher Davis-Benavides
Assistant Professor, Art, $11,299
Icon of Power:, a Visual Study of the Assimilation of Santiago

Peter Geissinger
Assistant Professor, Chemistry, $12,402
Experimental Determination of Electric Fields Emanating From Solid Surfaces – How Do Surfaces Catalyse Gas Reactions?

John Isbell
Associate Professor, Geosciences, $12,486
Fluvial and Tidal Sedimentology of Pennsylvanian Rocks in the Appalachian Basin

Kathi Kamm
Assistant Professor, $11,232
The Effects of Occupationally Embedded Activity on Supination By People with CVA

Tomas A. Lipinski
Assistant Professor, Library & Information Science, $7,647
Knowledge Creation in U.S.: Using Copyright Office Registration Information in Public Policy Decision Making

Paul F. Lyman
Assistant Professor, Physics, $12,458
New Growth Methods for Semiconductors

Pamela F. Phillips
Assistant Professor, Spanish and Portuguese, $6,000
In Search of Eighteenth-Century Spain: The Travel Narratives
Of Antonio Ponz

Linda M. Sabatini
Assistant Professor, $12,500
Molecular Basis of Environmental Risk Factors for Breast Cancer

Daad A. Saffarini
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences, $12,500
Molecular Analysis of FE(III) and MN(IV) Reduction By Shewanella Putrefaciens

Pamela Schermer
Associate Professor, Art, $7,493
The Momento Mori Series:, a Contemporary Exploration of the Vanitas Tradition in Still-Life Painting

Yehua (Dennis) Wei
Assistant Professor, Geography, $12,500
Intraprovincial Inequality in China:, Case Studies of Jiangsu and Zhejiang Provinces

Joan B. Wolf
Assistant Professor, Political Science, $6,970
Vichy on Trial: Touvier, Papon, and the Politics of Historical Responsibility

1998

John Agada
Assistant Professor, Library and Information Science
Access to the National Information Infrastructure in the Inner Cities: A Survey of Harambee Residents.

Kristin E. Espinosa
Assistant Professor, Sociology
The Effects of Welfare Reform on Mexican Immigrants in Milwaukee: A Pilot Study.

Vicki Grafentin
Assistant Professor, Art
New Sculptural Drawings.

Carol Hirschmugl
Assistant Professor, Physics
Infrared Investigations of Water-Oxide Interactions.

Goldie Kadushin
Assistant Professor, Social Welfare
Ethical Dilemmas of Social Workers in Home Health Care.

Jeffrey Merrick
Associate Professor, History
Domestic Conflict and Political Consciousness in 18th Century Paris.

Ethan V. Munson
Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Representing and Analyzing Relationships Among Software Documents with the Software Concordance.

Marina Perez De Mendiola
Associate Professor, Spanish and Portuguese
Visibility and Figurability: Latin America in French Contemporary Literature.

Sandra L. Pucci
Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction
Spanish Language Literacy Maintenance in One Latino/Mexicano Community.

Michael K. Reddy
Assistant Professor, Chemistry
The Biochemistry of Protein-DNA Interactions: Vaccinia Virus As a Eukaryotic Model System.

Sylvia Schafer
Assistant Professor, History
Citizenship, Public Assistance and the Politics of Difference in Modern France, 1840-1940.

Marlene M. Schmid
Assistant Professor, Health Restoration
A Study on the Development of Clinical Decision Algorithms.

Alan W. Schwabacher
Assistant Professor, Chemistry
Self-Assembled Receptors: A Route to Highly Selective Binding.

Rhea E. Steinpreis
Assistant Professor, Psychology
Treating Parkinsonian Symptoms with MK801 in An Animal Model.

Karudapuram E. Supriya
Assistant Professor, Communication
Cultural Memory, Identity, and Ethnography
British India As a Site.

Rodney A. Swain
Assistant Professor, Psychology
Cerebellar Angiogenesis: Its Determinants and Impact on Behavior.

Kyle Swanson
Assistant Professor, Geosciences
The Role of Atmospheric Dynamics in the Response of the Temperate Climate to El Nino.

Hanh Q. Trinh
Assistant Professor, Health Sciences
Strategic Management in the Hospital Industry: Alliance Versus Competition.

Yehua Wei
Assistant Professor, Geography
Intra-Provincial Inequality in Post-Mao China: Case Studies of Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Henan, and Yunnan Provinces.

1997

Fred Anapol
Anthropology
Expression of Genes for Slow- and Fast-Twitch Myosin Adenosine Triphosphatase in Developing Muscle.

Mark Bradley
History
Culture and Imperial Order in Southeast Asia, 1860-1910.

Virginia L. Carlson
Urban Planning
Women’s Wages and Industry Decentralization.

Lane Hall
Art
We Are Your Kinsmen’ Large-Format Print Installation.

George W. Hanson
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Electromagnetic Modeling of Complex Dielectric Mines in a Layered Earth.

Fred J. Helmstetter
Psychology
Real-Time Functional Imaging of Learning in the Human Brain.

Jonathan Kahl
Geosciences
Creation of a Polar Standard Atmosphere.

Mark Keane
Architecture
Wright.

Judith T. Kenny
Geography
Cultivating the Garden City: Politics and the Public Aesthetics of Bangalore, India.

Joan Liaschenko
Health Maintenance
The Work and Ethics of Nurse Managers: Analysis of Postdoctoral Data.

John W. Norbury
Physics
Search for An Intermediate Mass Higgs Boson.

Kathryn M. Olson
Communication
Shared Power, Contested Memory, and the Rhetorical Presidency.

Zhong-Ren Peng
Urban Planning
Development of An Integrated Land Use, Travel Behavior, and Air Quality Model.

Diane M. Reddy
Psychology
Project IMPACS: Improving Mammography Participation and Cancer Survivability.

Lex Renda
History
Midterm Congressional Decline: Federalism, Incumbency, and Negative Voting.

Linda A. Whittingham
Biological Sciences
Historical and Ecological Components of Behavior in Birds.

Michael D. Wilson
English
Hopaki: An Historical Novel.

Jane L. Witten
Biological Sciences
Cellular Distribution, Developmental Changes, and Hormonal Regulation of Potassium Ion Channels in the Nervous System.

1996

Melissa Hickman Barlow
Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice
Policing Black Milwaukee: A History of Relations Between Police and African Americans.

Leslie Bellavance
Professor, Art
‘Silhouette': An Exploration of Computer Imaging and Experimental Offset Printing in the Production of An Art Work.

Hector Bravo
Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering
Model for the Transport and Longitudinal Dispersion of Conservative Pollutants in Real Streams.

Lisa Dieker
Assistant Professor, Exceptional Education
Evaluating the Use of Cooperative Teaching.

Pamela Downing
Associate Professor, English and Comparative Literature
Socioeconomic Class and Interactive Language Use in the Home: Two Case Studies.

Sumanta Guha
Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Computational Topology.

Peter Haddawy
Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Intelligent Control of Computer Vision.

Sara Hoot
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Evolutionary and Phytogeographic Patterns in the Proteaceae Based on Molecular Data.

Elizabeth Kraemer
Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology
Student Learning, Classroom Climate and Student Behavior.

Susie Lamborn
Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology
Interviews with Ethnic Youth: Perceptions of Parenting Style and Adjustment.

Chiu-Tai Law
Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Light- Induced Waveguides and Switches.

Janet Lilly
Assistant Professor, Theatre and Dance
Solo Works.

Steve Mccole
Assistant Professor, Human Kinetics
Effect of Aging and Hormone Replacement Therapy on Blood and Plasma Volumes in Post-Menopausal Women.

Hamid Mohtadi
Associate Professor, Economics
Human Capital, Specialization and Economic Growth: An Empirical Analysis.

Terry Nardin
Professor, Political Science
The History of International Political Theory.

Panivong Norindr
Associate Professor, French and Italian
Pierre Loti in Morocco: Promoting Literary Impressionism and An Exotic Vision of the World.

Brian Reilly
Assistant Professor, Health Sciences
Complement Component C4 and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

Karen E. Riggs
Assistant Professor, Mass Communication
Elderly Women and Television Mysteries: Ritual and Late Life Experience.

Dilano Saldin Associate Professor, Physics; and Wilfred Tysoe Professor, Chemistry
Looking At Atoms and Molecules on Surfaces.

Scott V. Solberg
Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology
UWM – Comprehensive Assessment and Retention Programming.

Support for Undergraduate Research Fellows (SURF)

The Support for Undergraduate Research Fellows (SURF) program is designed to foster faculty-student research collaborations. Faculty and academic staff can apply for the awards to provide an hourly wage for undergraduate students working as research assistants. Students will be paid as hourly employees.

Office of Research/UWM Foundation Research Awards

First awarded in 1979, the annual Office of Research /UWM Foundation Research Awards recognize and encourage UWM assistant and associate professors who have shown the potential to achieve distinction in their academic disciplines through scholarship, creative activity, and the dissemination of knowledge.

Departments/programs are encouraged to nominate a faculty member for an award. In addition to providing a means of honoring outstanding researchers, these awards recognize our collective commitment to academic research and to the importance of UWM’s research mission.

Eligibility
These awards are not intended to recognize established faculty members who already have achieved distinction in their disciplines. Restrictions include:

  1. Previous research awardees are ineligible.
  2. Individuals holding the title of Distinguished or Wisconsin Distinguished Professor are ineligible.
  3. One individual may be nominated from a single department or program.

Nomination
The nomination materials should include a letter of nomination from a dean, department chair, or multidisciplinary program director; two letters of support; and an up-to-date vitae. You may secure letters of support from UWM faculty members or from colleagues outside UWM. If you wish to submit or quote from confidential letters written for another purpose, you must first secure the permission of the author(s).

Submission information is posted each year during the nomination period.

Selection
The Committee of UWM Distinguished Professors reviews the nominations and makes recommendations to the interim vice provost for research for the final selections. The individuals selected as recipients receive a $1,500 cash award and will be honored at the fall UWM Awards Ceremony.

Past Recipients

2013-2014

Alexander Arnold
Assistant Professor, Chemistry

Photo Alexander ArnoldAlexander Arnold has assumed a key role in UWM’s mission of discovering new medicines for human disease.

His discoveries on ligand-receptor interactions set the groundwork for novel drug development in the area of vitamin D, thyroid hormone, and androgen signaling, to name a few.

As a founding faculty member of the Milwaukee Institute for Drug Discovery (MIDD) at UWM, he uses his expertise in developing high-throughput screening methods for identifying promising drugs and drug targets from large molecular libraries.This is not only essential to his own research, but also for supporting the work of other researchers.

“Alexander has developed, equipped, and staffed a laboratory with broad expertise to perform in vitro pre-clinical assays and evaluate biological specimens from test animals. This capability is a core resource for my laboratory and many other investigators within the MIDD,” said nominator and UWM Distinguished Professor James Cook.

Arnold is currently involved in grants from the National Institutes of Health that total more than $5.3 million. His research has led to several patent applications, and two awarded patents, one of which was already licensed to the Boston biotechnology company KeraFAST Inc.

S. Scott Graham
Assistant Professor, English

Photo S. Scott GrahamCan an English professor lay the foundation for restoring public trust in a federal agency and encouraging the many stakeholders involved in crafting national health care policy to play nice?

S. Scott Graham just might. The ambitious assistant professor of technical and professional writing has been credited for bringing new energy to the UWM English Department since he arrived in 2012 and founded the Scientific and Medical Communications Laboratory (SAMComm).

Graham explores the effective and ethical uses of communication at the often volatile intersections of science and public policy, such as the interfaces among pharmaceutical companies, the Food and Drug Administration and public advocacy groups.

Rather than try to tease just quantitative data from these snarled webs of communication, Graham developed an innovative, qualitative data analysis server at SAMComm to document financial conflicts on federal pharmaceuticals policy.

In addition to national recognition, Graham is also attracting federal funding. English colleague Dave Clark writes that Graham’s funding so far–$300,000–and the nearly $1 million more in current proposals “promise to help the entire Professional and Technical Writing Program revise how it thinks about the potential of grant funding.”

Emily Latch
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences

Photo Emily LatchEmily Latch’s research uses molecular genetic tools and statistical genetic methods to understand how ecological processes influence formation of new species and hybridization of existing species.

Her work is highly regarded by national and international researchers in her discipline. In 2013, her published work received a total of 94 citations.

“Dr. Latch’s papers demonstrate an integration of methods and ideas across molecular genetics, ecology, evolutionary biology, and wildlife management that is extremely valuable to all of these fields, but too rarely demonstrated by others who have more narrow expertise or interests,” says nominator Robert Lacy, a leader in the field of conservation genetics who has joint research appointments at the University of Chicago and the Chicago Brookfield Zoo.

Sara Oyler-McCance of the U.S. Geological Survey calls Latch “an emerging leader in wildlife genomics,” who can convey complicated molecular concepts in a way that is understandable to a lay audience.

“Emily is particularly well-known for using genetic techniques to address questions in wildlife management. She has documented the impacts of reintroductions of wildlife species by looking at hybridization, gene flow, and social structure, and has provided much insight into management strategies.”

Todd Miller
Assistant Professor Zilber School of Public Health

Todd Miller photoThe research of Todd Miller focuses on algal blooms and the toxins they produce and release into the fresh- water environment, a potential threat to human health.

Miller is the leader of an international coalition of 20 scientists in 14 nations who collaborate to understand water eutrophication and algal toxin production.

With a background that encompasses micro- biology, genomics and analytical chemistry, he is well positioned to take a leading role in under- standing the nature of those problems and addressing their remediation.

“I do not know anyone else quite like him in terms of scientific breadth,” says nominator and UWM Distinguished Professor David Petering.

Miller also has linked his work to the greater community by partnering with the national Children’s Environmental Health Science Core Center and the City of Milwaukee Health Department on water quality issues.

In addition to these accomplishments, Miller has been wildly successful at attracting grants. In only three years, he has garnered just under $1 million in funding from the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health. Not only is it extremely difficult to obtain top-tier funding on the first try, but also Miller as earned these while the Zilber School was just launched.

Nathaniel Stern
Associate Professor, Art & Design

Photo Nathaniel SternNathaniel Stern’s work bridges multiple disciplines, merging new with traditional media, installation with inter- active art, and the maker community with entrepreneurial endeavors.

He shows a sustained commitment to contemp- orary art practice, a vast conceptual and technical expertise, and diverse experiences as a scholar and art practitioner.

“His scholarly and creative research thoughtfully and seamlessly integrate to analyze digital media in a manner rarely seen in academics with a hybrid practice,” says one of his nominators.

It’s one reason he is sought after by multiple disciplines at UWM to teach a variety of research- intensive courses, be it the graduate seminars in Art and Design, senior seminars in Global Studies, Product Realization in Engineering, Entrepre- neurship Experience in Business. As co-founder of UWM’s Student Startup Challenge, Stern inspires students to turn their ideas into companies.

“What distinguishes these pieces, and indeed all of Stern’s work,” says another nominator, “is a playful and rigorous collision of computational and digital media with more traditional media forms, whether prints, photographs or sculpture.”

This approach has earned him international acclaim. His project “Tweets in Space” garnered a huge buzz while still in its fundraising phase, with stories about the project appearing in Scientific American, National Geographic and Forbes.

2012-2013


Luca Ferrero
Associate Professor, Philosophy
ferreroLuca Ferrero is a recognized leader in the philosophy of action, a broad field that explores aspects of human action and decision-making, including intention and intentional action, the ontology of action, motivation, free will, and social action.

The work of philosophers of action often overlaps with that of non-philosophers including jurists, neuroscientists, and psychologists. Ferrero studies how the nature of intentional action changes over time, and how such actions influence personal identity.

Michael E. Bratman, professor of philosophy at Stanford University and eminent thinker in the philosophy of action, has cited four publications that best represent Ferrero’s work. “Taken together,” he writes. “these essays constitute an extended and insightful investigation into the relations between time and our rational, autonomous agency. I know of no other younger scholar of philosophy who has made such progress on these basic issues.”Recognition for his work include a 2005 Stanford Humanities Fellowship, selection for a 2011 NEH Summer Seminar on 20th Century American Philosophy at Princeton University, and numerous UWM distinctions, including two fellowship offers from the Center for 21st Century Studies, two Graduate School Research Committee Awards, and three Arts and Humanities Research Travel Awards. In addition, his 2008 essay “Action” tops the “Popular Essays” list on the Web site philosophyofaction.com.


Benjamin Johnson
Associate Professor, History
benjamin-johnsonBen Johnson’s areas of research include three somewhat overlapping yet distinct fields: the history of the American West, the broader history of the North American borderlands, and environmental history.

His first two award-winning books, Revolution in Texas: How a Forgotten Rebellion and Its Bloody Suppression Turned Mexicans into Americans, and Bordertown: The Odyssey of an American Place, explore racial strife on the U.S.-Mexico border. Johnson is now working on a history of the conservation movement in the Progressive Era, a time that popularized the idea that wilderness is spiritually renewing and an essential part of the national landscape.

Stephen Aron, professor and chair of the UCLA Institute for the Study of the American West, writes that Johnson’s achievements in Revolution in Texas go “well beyond the usual for a first book,” and that it “stands, in fact, as a primer for how to write borderlands history.” Aron further writes that Johnson’s scholarship is “shaping the direction of multiple fields and inspiring other scholars to do the same.”Among other achievements are a 2013-’14 NEH Faculty Fellowship for his project, “A History of the American Conservation Movement” and a faculty appointment in the 2013 NEH Summer Institutes for school teachers.


Krista Lisdahl
Assistant Professor, Psychology
krista-lisdahlKrista Lisdahl is advancing our understanding of how chronic drug use effects the brains of adolescents and young adults. With a unique, multidisciplinary approach integrating molecular genetics, brain structure and function, and behavior, her lab aims to better understand the cognitive consequences of a chronic pot habit in the developing brain, and whether physical exercise can reduce or even prevent the damage, or decrease drug abuse.

The research also seeks more information about the process of connectivity in the maturing brain and the role of physical activity in that process.

Described by a department colleague as “truly cutting edge work,” Lisdahl’s research has garnered several national awards, perhaps most notably the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on professionals in the early stages of their research careers.

Lisdahl has published 30 peer reviewed articles and book chapters and has eight more under review or in progress. Seven of her publications have come since her arrival at UWM in 2011. Lisdahl has 59 papers or posters presented at conferences and 11 invited lectures at research institutions around the country. Her research has been funded by more than $2 million from the National Institutes of Health.

2011-2012


Christine Larson
Associate Professor, Psychology
christine-larsonWhy is a smile perceived as happy, while a scowl is considered threatening? Christine Larson’s work on emotion has demonstrated that understanding the effects of visual signals of threat and happiness can be reduced to fundamental properties, such as their geometry.

Using two important techniques to explore the emotion-brain connection—neuro-imaging and psycho-physiology—Larson has discovered that certain shapes influence neural circuits in the brain that are involved in emotional processing.

With more than $1 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health, Larson also probes the regulation of emotions, with a focus on clarifying its role in depression and anxiety disorders.”Chris sets herself apart from psychologists who do neuro-imaging and psycho-physiology by being one of the few scientists in the world who does both,” according to one nominator.

Her work has been recognized by various publications and with several awards, including the K-award from N I H, given specifically to promising scientists wishing to acquire training in new areas of their disciplines. This will allow Larson to add molecular genetic techniques to her neurobiological investigations of emotional regulation.


Amanda Seligman
History
amanda-seligmanBetween Amanda Seligman’s numerous articles and well-reviewed book, Block-by-Block, colleagues say she is reshaping what scholars thought they knew about post-war urbanization. Eagerly anticipated is her book on community organizing in Chicago—of unique interest in political and pop-cultural contexts, in addition to its historical relevance. As America pondered similarities between the Great Depression and the 2008 financial collapse, Seligman designed and taught a 2009 class on the question, attracting more than 80 undergraduates and curious “drop-in” students in her fellow history faculty.

A richly detailed narrative style has earned her praise as a rising star in urban history and mirrors her exhaustive, engaging research approach. From neighborhood block parties to university laboratories, she strives for complete, balanced, accurate story-telling. As a humanities professor writing the book, Is Graduate School Really for You?, Seligman devoted additional time to researching and reporting on the experience of graduate students in laboratory sciences.

She continues to keep her research close to home as lead organizer and editor of the upcoming Encyclopedia of Milwaukee. For this collaboration between UWM and Marquette, Seligman helped secure RG I funding and negotiated key production contracts. She simultaneously contributed to other encyclopedias, directed the Urban Studies program and taught entry-level through doctoral students of history. It’s working, say colleagues, who note that Seligman has attracted “legions of graduate students” to UWM.


Xiaohua Peng
Chemistry and Biochemistry
xiaohua-pengXiaohua Peng has developed a novel platform for anticancer drugs that can specifically kill cancer cells while reducing the potential for toxicity to normal cells. The work could lead to cancer treatments with far fewer harsh side effects.”Her independent research has shown creativity, courage to try new ideas and the ability to integrate novel concepts across scientific disciplines,” says one nominator.

A founding faculty member of UWM’s Milwaukee Institute for Drug Discovery, Peng’s research has attracted international attention. Her work was featured in a news report published by the Royal Society of Chemistry, London. She has presented her work at National Institutes of Health workshops and at the Gordon Research Conference, considered the premier global scientific conference for leading investigators in the field.

Peng’s goal is to connect basic science discovery to improved patient care. Her work at UWM has led to two patent applications, a key step in the transfer of technology from the lab to use in oncology practice.

In May, she received the Greater Milwaukee Foundation’s Shaw Scientist Award, which, in addition to providing $200,000 in support of her work, recognizes the importance, impact and potential of her contributions to cancer research.


Na Jin Seo
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
na-jin-seoNa Jin Seo has produced biomechanical models that explain the need and potential for new hand-strength and function assessment tools in medical clinics. Currently, clinics measure hand strength and function with grip and pinch gauges that do not capture the subtle effects of neurological impairment nor take friction into account.”She is one of the most productive investigators in the field of hand biomechanics and rehabilitation,” says one nominator.

The National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research awarded Seo the Distinguished Fellowship Award for her research to develop innovative assistive devices for people with disabilities. Her research on how strokes affect hand functioning has appeared in both journals and non-journal publications, including Science Daily and Rehab Management magazine.

Seo has been exceptional in mentoring students in research, procuring extramural training fellowships for them from organizations such as the American Society of Biomechanics and the American Heart Association. Her graduate students took first, second and third places at this year’s Larry Hause Student Poster Competition held at the Milwaukee School of Engineering. Under her mentorship, 12 undergraduates have produced national and international conference publications.

Seo also participates in local stroke support groups, encouraging stroke survivors to become involved in community events and university research.

2010-2011


Margaret L. Fraiser
Assistant Professor, Geosciences
margaret-fraiserMargaret Fraiser’s work focuses on understanding how simple marine organisms adapted to, recovered from and evolved after the worst mass extinction of life in Earth’s history 252 million years ago.

The work is particularly significant because it is helping to unravel how ancient life forms responded to dramatic climate change and drastically elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

Fraiser is quickly becoming a world expert on this topic.

Working with six other colleagues from China, Australia, the U.K. and the U.S., Fraiser has helped form a large international collaborative of scientists who study patterns from the mass extinction biotic recoveries in various environmental settings and climate zones.

Working with six other colleagues from China, Australia, the U.K. and the U.S., Fraiser has helped form a large international collaborative of scientists who study patterns from the mass extinction biotic recoveries in various environmental settings and climate zones.

She also was asked to be a special guest editor for Global and Planetary Change, connecting her work to the quest to understand how Earth’s organisms will respond to climate change today and in the future.


Peter Geissinger
Associate Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
peter-geissingerPeter Geissinger’s record of accomplishment during the last 12 years at UWM is impressive. In addition to securing $2.25 million in funding, he has published 25 peer-reviewed journal articles and five book chapters. He has also transferred his research into a productive collaboration with local industry.

Advanced Chemical Systems, a Milwaukee-based company that develops water treatment technologies, has signed an option to license Geissinger’s optical-fiber sensor technology, which has been supported by the Bradley Foundation.

His novel research has also resulted in two patents—one issued and one pending. Geissinger recently completed a prestigious Erskine Fellowship at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand.”Peter’s research is truly ‘cross-cutting’ in that, while educated in physics, his work is not only within the discipline of physical chemistry, but also encompasses analytical, biochemical and environmental research,” says one nominator.

As an example, one of his doctoral students recently won “best poster” award at an annual meeting attended mostly by geologists, biologists and civil engineers. “To have the research of a physical chemistry group so well-recognized at this meeting is quite remarkable,” says a nominator.


Rebecca D. Klaper
Associate Professor, Freshwater Sciences
rebecca-klaperRebecca Klaper has clearly established herself as an expert on the biological effects of nanoparticles and emerging contaminants on aquatic organisms. She was one of the first researchers to identify the characteristics of nanomaterials that may cause toxicity in water.

In addition, she has conducted many studies gauging the effects of environmental exposure to trace amounts of pharmaceuticals in fish, including some of the first studies on how exposure to Prozac adversely affects fish reproductive behavior. Using genomics, she determines which genes in fish are “turned on” or “turned off” in controlling such behavior.

Klaper is a sought-after resource on environmental toxicology for numerous governmental agencies, including the U.

S. Environmental Protection Agency and the National Academy of Sciences panel on the health and safety aspects of engineered nanomaterials.

She also enthusiastically promotes science to the public. She was producer of the 2008 documentary film “Inland Seas: Understanding and Protecting the Waters of the Great Lakes.” In 2009 she was recognized by Milwaukee Magazine as one of 36 “new leaders under 40 who will change Milwaukee.”


Marius Schmidt
Assistant Professor, Physics
marius-schmidtMarius Schmidt has made important contributions in the relatively new field of timeresolved crystallography, a technique that allows him to image proteins as their atomic structure changes during biochemical reactions.

Using this X-ray diffraction technique, Schmidt can image an ensemble of molecules in five dimensions—three spatial dimensions and time. By adding and varying temperature, he can see all the changes in the protein as they happen, obtaining a comprehensive view of how it carries out essential functions.

This research could lead to a rational design of optical switches that could be used in biophysical research. Replicating the work of proteins also is an important aspect of new drug discovery. Schmidt received an Early Career Development (CAREER) Award in 2010, the most prestigious grant for younger researchers given by the National Science Foundation.”This is a competitive field in which Schmidt has excelled,” says one of his nominators. Says another: “With his connections, his worldclass experimental experience and his analysis methods, he is poised to make high-impact research in this new direction.”


Andrea C. Westlund
Assistant Professor, Philosophy
andrea-westlundAndrea Westlund is acknowledged by peers as much for her original contributions to moral philosophy as she is for her deeply relevant subject matter and everyday eloquence.”Her ideas are developing in new directions and it is absolutely clear that not only is her current work outstanding, but her best work is yet to come,” writes one colleague.

Westlund’s work on companion love and forgiveness—in “tightly argued, systematic, zero-fluff” writing—inspires particular praise. She does not proffer marital advice, nor does she make value-laden suggestions about those grievances that deserve forgiveness, or those that do not. Acknowledging the complexity of human relationships, she offers morality as a window through which to look at those near us and consider our response to them.

In her own words, forgiveness “expresses moral faith in an offender, understood as readiness to interpret the offender as worthy of one’s love and goodwill even though the underlying realities are indeterminate.”Westlund’s philosophy, adds another nominator, is the kind that lingers on after the book has been closed or the page has been turned. “Her work is never just an intellectual exercise. It is the sort of work that a reader can come away from personally changed.”

2009-2010


Jolien D. Creighton
Associate Professor, Physics
creightonJolien Creighton is one of a new breed of gravitational physicists who works at the interface of theory and experiment.

Detecting gravita­tional waves—ripples in space-time caused by violent movement of massive objects in space—is among the most challenging scientific endeavors of the century.

Finding evidence for gravitational waves requires the observation of a change in the distance between two mirrors on a detector that is smaller than a proton! It requires physicists like Creighton to extract a signal that is deeply buried in “noise,” a task that Creighton accomplishes using algorithms.

His research brings together a deep understand­ing of theoretical gravitational physics with a superb technical mastery of data analysis and statistical methodologies in a unique way. For example, he developed methods for detecting weak, short bursts of gravitational radiation from sources that cannot be accurately modeled theoretically or numerically.”The most recent talk I heard by Jolien was enti­tled something like, ‘Searches for gravitational waves from bursts, compact binaries and ringdowns,'” says Barry Barish, Linde Professor of Physics Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology. “This title alone demonstrates the breadth of his in-depth work because the three topics have very different chal­lenges and opportunities and Jolien has been central to all three.”His high stature in gravitational physics also is reflected in the funding he has received from the National Science Foundation, which includes well over $2 million in grants as principal investigator.


Jennifer A. Jordan
Associate Professor, Sociology
jordanJennifer Jordan has distinguished herself as an outstanding scholar for her work in the areas of collective memory and the sociology of food. She has maintained a remarkable pace of research since attaining tenure in 2006.

In her first book, Structures of Memory, she explores why certain places in the urban landscape of Berlin—and, by extension, other places such as Oklahoma City—become marked as signifi­cant in our collective memory, while others fade.”Her writings demonstrate a highly detailed and meticulous style of qualitative research,” says one nominator.

Now she has “made the turn” from the research of her dissertation, which resulted in the highly praised book, and created a whole new research direction. Her work on the cultural meanings of heirloom produce and heritage livestock links memory, loca­tion, status and taste.”Her attention to contexts of locale and space is one of Jennifer’s singular contributions to studies of collective memory,” says one nominator.

Not only has the draft of her second book, Edible Memory, already generated interest from one of the most prestigious presses in sociology, but Jordan also has garnered much coverage in the general media.

She also has been extraordinarily successful in generating external funding for research that is typi­cally un- or underfunded. In her time at UWM, she has received funding from no less than five different external sources, including the Austrian Science Fund, the Austrian equivalent of the National Science Foundation in the U.S.


Lindsay J. McHenry
Assistant Professor, Geosciences
mchenryMuch of Lindsay McHenry’s work has been focused at Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania, one of the world’s most famous paleo-anthropological locations, and is helping to unravel questions of early human evolution.

McHenry is a geologist who uses geochemical analysis and correlation of volcanic ashes to help archaeolo­gists at Olduvai accurately date finds at excava­tion sites.

These artifacts are buried in a complex succession of sedimentary and highly altered volcanic strata, rather than in neat, chronological layers. That has prevented researchers from iden­tifying the first appearance of some of the various fossils and stone-tool technologies.

McHenry is involved in fieldwork in at least three other sites near Olduvai, demonstrating the interest of many project leaders in counting on her expertise, says one nominator. “It is not an exag­geration to state that Dr. McHenry is becoming a key researcher on the study of quaternary geology in East Africa.”Because of the importance of Olduvai and the charged political climate, it is extremely difficult to obtain funding and permits to work in the gorge. But McHenry has managed to navigate these diffi­cult waters and secure substantial funding.

As a result, she advanced this summer from being a participant on various field teams working within the gorge to being a lead principal inves­tigator and team leader in charge of an interna­tional group.

Her research in altered volcanic ash in archaeo­logical contexts has also led McHenry to a new line of inquiry. She has discovered that her meth­ods are relevant to the study of the history of water on Mars.


Abdolhosein “Adel” Nasiri
Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
nasiriAdel Nasiri’s research is focused on wind energy, particu­larly energy-efficient electronics and wind turbines, as well as the effective use of energy storage systems. His work addresses the need to integrate renewable energy systems with conven­tional power sources without major disruptions.

In the past five years, he has demonstrated great potential to achieve distinction in the field through his scholarship, well-funded research activities and broad collaboration, especially with local industry, which provides some of his funding.”Dr. Nasiri is a scholar with a strong record of research accomplishments that can have significant impacts in solving our energy crisis,” says one nomi­nator. “Moreover, he plays a crucial role in connecting with local companies owing to the synergy of his research with the industrial base in Wisconsin.”Since joining the faculty in 2005, Nasiri has acquired two patents, and a third is pending. He has achieved an impressive level of funding from the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy, and has developed collabora­tive research relationships with other UWM schools and departments and other institutions in Milwaukee.

His large team of 11 graduate students demon­strates his success in building a research program in power electronics and renewable energy in only a brief period.”The record of external funding shows that he is gaining recognition for his creativity and innovations,” says a nominator. “His professional activities are commensurate with a ‘rising star’ in his field.”

2008-2009


Scott J. Adams
Associate Professor, Department of Economics
adamsScott Adams specializes in the economics of health policy, the labor market for older workers, and the effect of living-wage ordinances—popular local laws that set wages that companies doing business with the government must pay to their employees.

Adams has become a national expert on these policies, showing how they have affected employment and the distribution of income.

He is a skilled and creative researcher, whose studies have generated substantial interest from the popular media, including the Washington Post, USA Today and The Economist.

He also is highly sought-after by policymakers. A clear indication of the regard with which his work is held in the profession was his selection last academic year as a senior staff economist on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers.

The nine appointees to this post are chosen by the best economists from a handful of leading departments. Adams is the first from UWM to be named to this position.


Erica Bornstein
Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology
bornsteinErica Bornstein’s research on humanitarianism in India, begun after her arrival at UWM in 2004, is at the forefront of the emerging field of comparative studies of humanitarianism. Her work encompasses philanthropy, charity, humanitarianism, nongovernmental organizations, political anthropology and the anthropology of religion.

Her 2003 book, The Spirit of Development: Protestant NGOs, Morality, and Economics in Zimbabwe, has been adopted for courses in at least 15 universities, including Stanford and the London School of Economics.In 2006-07, Bornstein was one of six resident scholars at the School of Advanced Research on the Human Experience in New Mexico. In 2008 she co-organized an advanced seminar at the school that produced the forthcoming volume Forces of Compassion: Humanitarianism Between Ethics and Politics.James Ferguson, chair of the Anthropology Department at Stanford University, wrote that Bornstein “combines an extraordinarily acute, critical intelligence with exceptional imagination, creativity and intellectual curiosity,” adding that her dissertation was “one of the most exciting and original that I have seen.”


Michael Liston
Professor, Department of Philosophy
listonMichael Liston has distinguished himself among philosophers of science and mathematics with his deep knowledge of the disciplines’ actual history. He has compiled an impressive record of research in the philosophies of science, mathematics and language, and has also written on the philosophy of logic and philosophical naturalism.

Liston is currently writing a book on philosopher, physicist and historian Pierre Duhem, an important figure of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Liston’s research on Duhem’s philosophy of science was funded by a 2006 UWM Research Growth Initiative<sup® (RGI) award, and subsequently by the National Science Foundation in 2007, a rare accomplishment among philosophers.

Arnold Koslow, philosophy professor at City University of New York, calls many of Liston’s papers “philosophical gems so worthy, and filled with interesting arguments and evaluations that they will repay continued study.”Liston has also been a fellow at the Center for 21st Century Studies and received two UWM Sabbatical awards and a Graduate School Research Committee Award.


Jorg Woehl
Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
woehlJorg Woehl’s research expertise lies in the imaging and manipulation of single nanoscale objects.

Prior to coming to UWM in 2004, Woehl had already built a reputation in his field—near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), which uses a subwavelength light source as a scanning probe.

He is one of the few people in the world with this expertise and has built an extremely sophisticated experimental laboratory focusing on NSOM imaging. The equipment he has built is so precise that it can obtain information on a single molecule.

He also is investigating nano-positioning methods for molecules on surfaces, such as proteins in biological membranes. If successful, such methods would provide new avenues for probing molecular function and present new potential applications.

Woehl has filed three patent applications related to his research on methods for fabricating novel optical fiber tips from photonic crystal fibers. He also has translated his initial experimental successes into both publications and funding since his arrival at UWM.


Lei “Leslie” Ying
Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
yingLei Ying’s work revolves around improving magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, which currently are too slow to be effective for use on parts of the body that move, such as the heart.

Ying’s work has opened up a new research direction for developing algorithms that will achieve the highest imaging speed possible.

She is one of the first researchers to investigate the application of a math theory called “compressing sensing” to MRI, and she is leading the field. Compressed sensing would enable MRIs to produce real-time pictures of internal human organs without sacrificing the quality of the image. It could potentially improve diagnoses of many diseases.

Ying’s achievements have recently been recognized by the National Science Foundation with a prestigious Early CAREER Award.

She holds two U.S. patents through the UWM Research Foundation and will soon have a third. In addition, Ying has established collaborations with other institutions and industries, and with other departments at UWM.

2007-2008


Junhong Chen
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering
junhong-chenThe research of mechanical engineer Junhong Chen includes unique production of nanoparticles for advanced technology devices and development of nanoscale gas and biological sensors.

Using plasma—partially ionized gases—Chen’s lab produces nanocrystals with precise size, form, structure, and composition, and on various surfaces.

The miniaturized gas sensors under development in his lab, which rapidly identify trace amount of gases/vapors or their mixtures, are important in such areas as environmental monitoring, medical diagnosis, food processing, and control of other industrial processes. Chen’s UWM Research Foundation Catalyst Grant is funding development of a nanoscale gas sensor that combines and improves upon two existing sensor technologies.

Chen’s graduate advisor at the University of Minnesota, Jane Davidson, writes that “he is one of the leading young scientists in the U.S. and has the intellect and drive to become one of the future superstars.”Other funding for Chen’s research since 2004 includes a Research Growth Initiative® award, five grants from the National Science foundation, and grants from the Environmental Protection Agency, Xerox Corporation, and Miller Electric Manufacturing in Appleton.


Dyanna Czeck
Assistant Professor, Geosciences
dyanna-czeckDyanna Czeck studies how rocks deform under stresses caused by tectonic motions. Such research is important for understanding how and where rocks may fault—break catastrophically—or flow—deform gradually—in tectonically active areas.

Her specific areas of study include the three-dimensional flow processes, mineral alignment, and strain in deformed rocks.

Czeck’s work is remarkable for the wide range of research techniques she employs. In addition to traditional geologic field mapping and geophysical surveys, she uses electron microscopy, material flow studies, and GIS technologies.

Czeck is a widely traveled researcher, having done fieldwork in the Sierra Nevada mountains, Wisconsin, Minnesota, New Mexico, Utah, Canada, Scotland, and Spain.

UW-Madison structural geologist Basil Tikoff writes of Czeck, “Her integration of field geology, quantitative analysis, and geophysical methods has had a major impact” on knowledge of lateral-motion faults, adding that “It is a pleasure to work with someone as intellectually alive as Dyanna.”In addition to a 2005 grant from the National Science Foundation, Czeck received a 2003 UWM Research Committee Award and a 2006 Research Growth Initiative® award.


Prasenjit Guptasarma
Associate Professor, Physics
prasenjit-guptasarmaUnderstanding unconventional superconductivity, and other phenomena involving strong interactions between electrons, is considered the Holy Grail of condensed matter physics. Such research has helped produce many electronic devices we use today—devices that are faster, greener, cheaper, and smarter.

Prasenjit Guptasarma and his colleagues have carried out pioneering work in superconductivity and magnetism, now published in many influential research journals such as Nature. In 2005, Guptasarma won the National Science Foundation’s prestigious CAREER award. Today, he continues to attract a substantial level of extramural funding.

To probe fundamental interactions, physicists use single crystals and study them in extreme environments such as very low temperature and high magnetic field.”He ranks among the most promising young experimental physicists in this country today,” says Arun Bansil, program manager in the Office of Science at the U.

S. Department of Energy. “He is already among the best crystal growers in the world.”He also is well-known for the how often other scientists cite his published work in their own research. More than 1,500 publication citations places Guptasarma in the top 5 percent of associate professors in condensed matter physics, says Marshall Onellion, professor of physics at UW-Madison.

2006-2007


Daniel Agterberg
Associate Professor, Physics
Daniel Agterberg’s basic research is helping explain how superconductors work. They’re already revolutionizing the power, cell-phone, and magnetic imaging industries, but Agterberg is helping to overcome obstacles that could allow superconductors to help create a new type of faster, quantum computer.

How some materials are able to conduct electricity with zero resistance has long been a mystery to scientists, and Agterberg’s bold predictions have helped overturn long-standing beliefs and resolved some important questions.

Professor Manfred Sigrist, at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, writes that “Daniel is a highly gifted and original researcher with the rare talent to connect experiments and theoretical concepts in a very physical and intuitive way.”Agterberg attracted a nearly quarter-million-dollar grant from the National Science Foundation, an impressive feat in the competitive field of superconductivity.

Agterberg is primary or contributing author of 50 articles since 1993 and has been invited to give 20 conference presentations and 21 seminars and colloquia. He has also received two UWM Research Committee Awards and funding for a 2006 Research Growth Initiative® proposal.


Jian Chen
Assistant Professor, Chemistry
With previous success in industry, Jian Chen has hit the ground running at UWM. Since arriving in August 2005, the materials chemist has focused his group’s research on fundamental understanding of organic nanomaterials and their applications in alternative energies, smart materials, and biomedical materials and devices.

After nearly five years of research and development at nanotech company Zyvex Corporation, Chen has established a state-of-the-art nanomaterials laboratory at UWM and collaborated with researchers from the College of Engineering and Applied Science and the WATER Institute.

At UWM Chen has generated over $910,000 in external funds from the National Science Foundation and Environmental Protection Agency, and has received Research Growth Initiative® funding in each year of the program, as well as a 2007 MiTAG award.

Kristene Surerus, Chair of the UWM Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, praises Chen’s “multidisciplinary approach and wide-ranging collaborations with physicists, chemists, biologists, and engineers,” and writes that “Jian has excelled both in an industrial setting and in academia.”Chen holds seven patents, and has filed three provisional patents since coming to UWM.


Shaoqin “Sarah” Gong
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering
After just two years at UWM, Shaoqin “Sarah” Gong has established one of the best research funding records at the College of Engineering and Applied Science.

Gong is developing microcellular biobased polymer nanocomposites with the goal of improving the performance of plastics made from renewable resources. She also is making new polymers suitable for human tissue regeneration and drug delivery. In addition, she is developing novel polymer nanocomposites with unique actuation capabilities. She is author or co-author of 70 technical papers on a wide range of topics,Gong’s research has attracted over $1.2 million extramural funding from the National Science Foundation, Environmental Protection Agency, and the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, including an NSF CAREER award, the most prestigious award for junior faculty members. She also is a principal investigator for three UWM Research Growth Initiative® grants.

Lih-Sheng Turng, co-director of the UW-Madison Polymer Engineering Center, writes, “Every major research university would like to have Professor Gong in light of her research accomplishments and fund-raising record . . . which are incredible, to say the least.”


Thomas Hubka
Professor, Architecture
Thomas Hubka is widely recognized for his studies of vernacular architecture, which refers to common, everyday buildings indigenous to a specific time or place.

He is best-known for his research on 18th century wooden synagogues of Eastern Europe. In the words of UWM Architecture Department Chair Brian Wishne, this work “single-handedly restored the history and significance of the architecture of Polish wooden synagogues from the lost Jewish-built culture and communities of Eastern Europe.”Culminating in the 2003 book, Resplendent Synagogue, this work led to Hubka’s lifetime achievement award from the Vernacular Architecture Forum in 2004.

His 1984 book, Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn—also recognized by the Vernacular Architecture Forum—was described by a reviewer as “one of the standard works on regional farmsteads in America.”Other areas of his research include imagery in the design process, New England farm architecture, vernacular architecture theory, and the architecture of H.H. Richardson.

He is currently investigating American popular housing of the 19th and 20th centuries, including case studies of working-class housing in major U.S. cities.

2005-2006

Patrick Brady, Physics
Adrian Dumitrescu, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Rina Ghose, Geography
Karen Marek, Nursing
Krishna Pillai, Mechanical Engineering

2004-2005

Paul Brewer, Journalism and Mass Communication
Gil Indig, Chemistry/Biochemistry
Paul Lyman, Physics
Gabrielle Pinter, Mathematical Sciences

2003-2004

Anthony Azenabor, Health Sciences
Kyoung Ae Cho, Visual Arts
Lian Li, Physics
Thomas Malaby, Anthropology
Mark Netzloff, English

2002-2003

Graham Moran, Chemistry
Lisa Samuels, English
Kyle Swanson, Mathematical Sciences
Yehua Dennis Wei, Geography
Vladislav Yakovlev, Physics

2001-2002

Fred Helmstetter, Psychology
Carol Hirschmugl, Physics
Eun-Ok Im, Health Maintenance
Zhong-Ren Peng, Urban Planning

2000-2001

Ryo Amano, Mechanical Engineering
Carla Bagnoli, Philosophy
Keith Corzine, EE & Computer Science

1999-2000

Bettina Arnold, Anthropology
Tien-Chien Jen, Mechanical Engineering
Jeffrey Karron, Biological Sciences
Mark Schwartz, Geography

1998-1999

Stephen Forst, Bio Sci
Peter Haddawy, Electrical Engineering & Comp Sci
David Pritchard, Mass Comm
Ann Snyder, Health Sciences

1997-1998

Martha Carlin, History
Marija Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Physics
Mark McBride, Bio Sci
Rhea Steinpreis, Psychology

1996-1997

Bruce Allen, Physics
Fred Anapol, Anthropology
Laura Peracchio, Bus Admin
Leslie Schulz, Health Sciences

1995-1996

Reinhold Hutz, Bio Sci
Craig Sandgren, Bio Sci
Kristene Surerus, Chemistry
Anastasios Tsonis, Geosci

1994-1995

Mike Allen, Communication
Dennis Bennett, Chemistry
Chie Craig, Comm Sci and Disorders
Suresh Garimella, Mechanical Engineering
Patricia Mellencamp, Art History

1993-1994

Barry Brummett, Communication
John Heywood, Economics
Mahmun Hossain, Chemistry
Neil Oldridge, Health Sciences
Dilano Saldin, Physics

1992-1993

Sherry Ahrentzen, Architecture
Mohsen Bahmani, Economics
Milicent Ficken, Bio Sci
Terry Nardin, Political Sci
Bimal Sarma, Physics

1991-1992

Yvo Desmedt, Electrical Engineering & Comp Sci
Richard Perlman, Economics
Carla Sinopoli, Anthropology
Brian Tonner, Physics
Gerald Weisman, Architecture

1990-1991

Fred Berman, Art
Richmond McQuistan, Physics
Ruth Phillips, Bio Sci
Pradeep Rohatgi, Materials
Mark Sothmann, Human Kinetics

1989-1990

David Amrani, Health Sciences
Gerald Bergtrom, Bio Sci
Glen Jeansonne, History
Tong Hun Lee, Economics
Robert K. Turner, English & Comp Lit

1988-1989

John Buntin, Bio Sci
Sidney Greenfield, Anthropology
C. Frank Shaw, Chemistry
Richard Sorbello, Physics
Yehuda Yannay, Music

1987-1988

Mary Lynne Perille-Collins, Bio Sci
J. Patrick Gray, Anthropology
Susan Riesch, Foundations of Nursing
Izzet Sahin, Bus Admin
William Wainwright, Philosophy

1986-1987

George Davida, Electrical Engineering/Computer Science
Victor Greene, History
Moises Levy, Physics
Will Rayms, Bus Admin
William Wehrenberg, Health Sciences

1985-1986

Carolyn Aita, Materials
Melvin Friedman, Comparative Literature
John W.K. Harris, Anthropology
G. William Page, Urban Planning
Adolph Rosenblatt, Art

1984-1985

Richard Blau, Film
Jacqueline Clinton, Nursing
John Koethe, Philosophy
David Lichtman, Physics
Markos Mamalakis, Economics
James McFarland, Chemistry

1983-1984

Michael Day, Geography
Dennis Gensch, Bus Admin
Haig Khatchadourian, Philosophy
Leonard Parker, Physics
Cecelia Ridgeway, Sociology

1982-1983

S.H. Chan, Mechanical Engineering
Peter Farrell, Human Kinetics
David Petering, Chemistry
Jane Waldbaum, Art History
Kathleen Woodward, English

1981-1982

James Cronin, History
John Friedman, Physics
Sarah Vogen, English
William Washabaugh, Anthropology

1980-1981

Arthur Brooks, Zoology
James Cook, Chemistry
J. Walter Elliott, Bus Admin/Economics
Joan Moore, Sociology

1979-1980

Uriel Cohen & Gary Moore, Architecture
Robert Eidt, Geography
Robert Greenler, Physics

1978-1979

John Downey, Music
David Hull, Philosophy
David Tong, Physics

UWM Research Foundation Senior Faculty Awards

The UWM Research Foundation, in collaboration with the Office of Research, has established the UWM Research Foundation Senior Faculty Awards, designed to recognize researchers who have a long history of significant contributions to their field of research. Unlike the Office of Research/UWM Foundation Research Awards which recognize assistant and associate professors, all research faculty members, except UWM Distinguished Professors, are eligible for these awards.The Committee of UWM Distinguished Professors reviews the nominations and makes recommendations to the Associate Provost for Research for the final selections. The individuals selected as recipients will receive a $1,500 cash award and will be honored at the fall UWM Awards Ceremony.

We encourage you to consider nominating a member of your department/program for an award. In addition to providing a means of honoring outstanding researchers, these awards recognize our collective commitment to academic research and to the importance of UWM’s research mission.

Nomination Procedures
A call for nominations is sent to campus each Spring from the Office of the Associate Provost for Research. The nomination materials should include a letter of nomination, two letters of support, and an updated vitae. You may secure letters of support from UWM faculty members or from colleagues outside UWM. Submission of or quotation from confidential letters written for another purpose require permission of the author(s).

Past Recipients

2013-2014

Junhong Chen,
Professor, Mechanical Engineering

junhong-chenJunhong Chen’s research projects are at the intersection of interesting fundamental science and industrial applications. In the College of Engineering and Applied Science, Chen is professor of both Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, and an Excellence in Engineering Faculty Fellow in Nanotechnology. His research focuses on nanomaterial innovations for sustainable energy and environment.

Dr. Chen has invented a dry technique to efficiently and effectively assemble nanocrystals onto carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene-based materials. The resulting structures could enable numerous new opportunities for nanoscience and advanced applications in biosensors, gas sensors, water sensors, solar cells, nanoelectronics, catalysis, and nanomanufacturing.

In 2011 he founded NanoAffix Science to commercialize nanotechnologies invented in his UWM lab.

Chen is currently director of the Water Equipment and Policy Research Center, one of many industry-university partnership funded by the National Science Foundation.

College of Engineering and Applied Science dean and Mechanical Engineering colleague Tien-Chien Jen calls Chen “a star faculty on the UWM campus” who has “demonstrated an extremely high level of excellence in both research and entrepreneurship during his post at UWM.”In addition to grants from the NSF, Chen receives funding from the U.S. Department of Energy and industries including Xerox, Johnson Controls, We Energies, Rockwell Automation, and Sigma Aldrich.

Thomas Holbrook
Professor, Political Science

Thomas Holbrook is a renowned scholar of American politics, whose work has focused on various aspects of political behavior, campaigns and elections, and voting behavior. His articles, which include analyses at both the state and national levels, have been cited more than 2,400 times, a strong testament to the significant impact of his work on his field.

On the faculty at UWM since 1989, Holbrook is the chair and Wilder-Crane Professor of Government in the Department of Political Science. He has served as editor of the journal American Politics Research and on the editorial boards of American Journal of Political Science, American Politics Quarterly, American Politics Research, and State Politics and Policy Quarterly.

He is former director of the UWM Undergraduate Laboratory for the Empirical Analysis of Politics (ULEAP).

James Garand, the Emogene Pliner Distinguished Professor and R. Downs Poindexter Professor at Louisiana State University, calls Holbrook “an outstanding scholar who is a major contributor to scholarship that furthers our understanding of American politics.”

He has attracted over $500,000 in federal funding from the National Science Foundation—an impressive total for a social science researcher—and more than $200,000 in UWM Research Growth Initiative® grants.

Lian Li
Professor, Physics

Lian Li has an active and highly regarded research program focused on the study of the electronic and structural properties of exotic materials such as graphene and topological insulators. What he is learning about graphene—a single later of carbon atoms—are important pieces of a puzzle that may unlock graphene’s potential as a material for next-generation electronics and quantum computing.

Experimental physicists in this field typically either specialize in growing a material or use a specific advanced characterization technique to investigate that material’s physical properties, notes Michael Weinert, Physics Department chair and UWM Distinguished Professor. He continues, “Lian is one of only a small number of people worldwide that actually does—and excels in—both aspects.”

Li has received continuous funding for his work from the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy since 2003. He has attracted over $4 million in federal funds in a highly competitive field. This achievement is even more impressive, Weinert says, given that applicants to the programs that fund him have just a 10 percent success rate.

Professor Li is also a previous recipient of the prestigious NSF CAREER Award, the Office of Research/UWM Foundation Research Award, and the UWM Research Committee Award.

Roger O. Smith
Professor, Occupational Therapy

roger-smithRoger O. Smith has made a career-long commitment to advancing the field of rehabilitation science. Since arriving at UWM in 1994, Smith has made extraordinary contributions to the understanding of individuals with disabilities and strategies to improve their participation in daily activities.

His wide-ranging academic background in occupational therapy, engineering, and the social sciences has led to a research program that has been recognized nationally and internationally. His establishment in 2001 and successful management of the UWM Rehabilitation Research Design and Disability (R2D2) Center has resulted in a self-sustaining research center that brings together top scholars—from the College of Health Sciences, across the university, and throughout the broader research community—to answer some of the most complex problems facing the field of disability research.

Professor Carol Haertlein Sells, a longtime colleague in the UWM College of Health Sciences, calls Smith “one of the most innovative thinkers in our profession who has been sought out by international colleagues to advance their understanding of these critical topics.”

Smith has attracted 32 grants totaling over $9.5 million from sources including the U.S. Department of Education, the National Institute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research, and the Wisconsin Department of Health Services.

2012-2013

Fred Helmstetter
Professor, Psychology

fred-helmstetterFred Helmstetter is among the world’s leading researchers studying how the brain works, focusing on the brain’s fundamental mechanisms of encoding and storing memory. Through experiments on rats and humans, he has advanced our understanding of the neural systems that support complex psychological phenomena such as learning, memory, and emotion. He has also shown new ways that experience and learning can modify the structure and function of the nervous system.

Psychology Department Chair Douglas Woods credits Helmstetter’s “planning, vision, and dogged support of excellence” for the tremendous growth of the department’s research productivity over the last 15 years.

Michael Fanselow, co-director of the UCLA Integrative Center for Learning and Memory, writes, “I can think of few people that have had such a broad impact” on our understanding of learning and memory.

Helmstetter’s nearly $5 million in funded research since 2002-2003 ranks 10th among all UWM researchers during that time. His internal funding has also been impressive, including two RGI grants as principal investigator and four as co-investigator, as well as a collaboration on a 2010 Intercampus Research Incentive Grant.

Among the 17 Ph.D. students Helmstetter has supervised, five have earned prestigious NIH National Research Service Award training fellowships.

Helmstetter’s publications include over 80 peer reviewed articles and book chapters and over 170 published abstracts.

James Peoples
Professor, Economics

james-peoplesJames Peoples—whose broad research interests fall within the economics of transportation systems and labor markets—may be best known outside academe for studies of public transportation labor and infrastructure issues.

In 2010 testimony before the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, Peoples presented research revealing the importance of greater investment in public transit as a complement to a comprehensive jobs program. He testified that public-transportation projects make the most substantial economic impact on jobs and improved transportation systems. The White House again invited Peoples in 2012 for a meeting on African Americans, jobs and the economy.

UWM Distinguished Professor of Economics Moshen Bahmani-Oskooee has cited People’s “tireless work ethic and admirable innovativeness” and “prolific and consistent output.” In addition to 38 refereed journal articles, he has written 10 book chapters and three encyclopedia entries, edited four books, and made 42 conference presentations.

Peoples is editor of the Advances in Airline Economics series, associate editor of the Review of Black Political Economy, editorial board member of the journal Transport Policy, and president of the Transportation and Public Utilities GroupBahmani-Oskooee concludes, “His passion for research and interest in sharing that passion with others has contributed to him becoming a central figure in the research reputation of the department of economics at UWM.”

Robin Pickering-Iazzi
Professor, Italian

robin-pickering-iazziRobin Pickering-Iazzi is internationally recognized as one of the top scholars in modern and contemporary Italian studies. Her many areas of inquiry include Italian literature and film, feminist theory, gender studies, and cultural studies.

Her groundbreaking research on Italian women during Fascism has revealed important contributors to Italian literature and culture, in contrast to the stereotype of obedient, submissive mothers.

Pickering-Iazzi’s examination of portrayals and realities of the Italian Mafia and criminality are so pioneering that her undergraduate Mafia course premiered years before the first such course appeared in Italy in 2004.

Dana Renga, assistant professor of Italian at Ohio State University, writes, “I can think of no one working in the fields of Nineteenth, Twentieth, and Twenty-First century Italian literature, film, and cultural studies more deserving of [this award].”

Her scholarly productivity—including books, edited collections, translations, and journal articles—has remained high, even with heavy teaching loads and her role as Italian program coordinator. Since she took on the role in 2000, the number of Italian majors has increased almost tenfold.

In addition to Pickering-Iazzi’s numerous UWM awards—including two fellowships at the former Center for 20th Century Studies—she has also been funded by the Italian National Research Council.

2011-2012

Kathleen Dolan
Professor, Political Science

kathleen-dolanUWM political scientist Kathleen Dolan is a leading scholar on the impact of gender on American politics. She has made important contributions to our understanding of voting behavior and public opinion, gaining a national and international reputation in the process.Dolan currently is funded by the National Science Foundation to examine the impact of voter stereotypes on support for female candidates in gubernatorial and congressional races. She has nearly completed her second book, Does Gender Matter in Elections? The book explores whether voters employ gender stereotypes when evaluating women candidates and discusses the role of candidates’ campaign decisions and the media’s reporting decisions.Dolan’s work often elicits strong reactions from journalists, commentators and members of the general public, but UWM colleague Marcus Ethridge says she “addresses them through rigorous empirical analysis, using sound statistical skills to shed light on the ways gender stereotyping affects public opinion and on the different choices men and women make in the voting booth. [Dolan’s] work has corrected false presumptions and clarified important insights.”Her work has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, and other top journals. Colleagues praise Dolan for her involvement in professional associations, service on committees and boards, and editorships.Martha Carlin
Professor, History

martha-carlin Much of what is known about everyday life in medieval England is a result of the tireless work of UWM history professor Martha Carlin, whom one nominator calls “the most knowledgeable scholar in the English-speaking world on the subject of how medieval urban householders fed and clothed themselves.”Her focus on social, economic and urban history has produced highly regarded books. In Medieval Southwark (1996), she traced the urban development of London’s first suburb from the year 50 to 1550. In London and Southwark Inventories 1316-1650 (1997), she cataloged from obscure legal documents more than 1,900 surviving inventories that shed light on the personal property of medieval and early modern debtors.In all, Carlin has seven published or forthcoming books to her credit, as well as 26 articles, 16 book reviews, and more than 50 conference presentations and lectures. Her efforts were recognized with her 1996 election as a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society in London.Carlin’s exhaustive research in European libraries and archives has been funded in part by 11 travel awards from the Graduate School since 1995. Other UWM awards include a 1991 Graduate School Research Committee Award and a 1998 Graduate School (now Office of Research)/UWM Foundation Research Award.Hugo Lopez
Professor, Materials Engineering

hugo-lopez Hugo Lopez is widely known in the academic and research community for his work in developing advanced engineering materials.He has been at the forefront in the development of cobalt alloys with important applications in improving biomedical devices such as hip implants. His advances developing aluminum alloys and nodular irons have helped solve engineering challenges in the manufacture of engine blocks, heads and crankshafts for General Motors and Chrysler.Lopez has published more than 200 articles and conference papers, which have been cited more than 600 times in scientific literature.Tien-Chien Jen, mechanical engineering professor and former UWM College of Engineering and Applied Science interim dean, calls Lopez “a recognized leader in the development of cobalt-based alloys with enhanced properties for applications in the biomedical field.”Last year Lopez was named a level-three member of the prestigious Mexican National System of Research Scientists. This year he was awarded the 2012 British Foundry Medal and Prize. Also, he is the founding editor-in-chief of the open-access journal Metals, established in 2011.Lopez has been primary or co-investigator on 20 grants, contracts and research awards, as well as founder and organizer of a 2011 international welding symposium and organizer of the World Casting Congress earlier this year.

2010-2011

Dennis W. Bennett
Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry

dennis-bennettDennis Bennett’s research explores the structures and bonding of molecules within crystals, and how these molecules are affected by differences in electron charge density.

Among his accomplishments in the field of crystallography is revealing the complex decomposition process of sulfur-oxygen compounds, which had stumped other researchers.

Bennett last year completed a textbook titled Understanding Single Crystal X-ray Crystallography. Joseph Ferrara, a vice president at the Molecular Structure Corporation, writes, “If I were to teach a course in small molecule crystallography, this is the book I would use…. I can honestly say I wish I had this book when I was in school.

“Bennett also has written a widely used molecular graphics program called MolXtl. His collaboration beginning in the 1980s with UWM Professor James Otvos—developing methods for blood analysis, primarily determining “good” and “bad” cholesterol levels—led to the formation in 1994 of the diagnostic company today known as LipoScience.

Bennett has written more than 130 published articles and five book chapters.

Patrick R. Brady
Professor, Physics

patrick-brady For Patrick Brady, this UWM Research Foundation Senior Faculty Award is just one more of the many accolades he has received for his outstanding work on black holes and the search for gravitational waves.

While achieving full professorship after just eight years at UWM, Brady has been recognized with prestigious awards from the Sloan Foundation, the Research Corporation for Science Advancement and the UWM Graduate School. Perhaps most notable is his 2010 election as a fellow of the American Physical Society, an honor earned by no more than half a percent of society members annually.

In a support letter for the APS fellowship, one reviewer wrote that Brady “is in every way a perfect gem, guaranteed to bring life, enthusiasm and the highest standards of scholarship to any group lucky enough to get him.

”At UWM, Brady directs the Center for Gravitation and Cosmology, one of the most prominent such centers worldwide, and he plays a leading role in the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, whose ambitious goal is to establish gravitational-wave astronomy.


Sandra Braman
Professor, Communication
sandra-braman Sandra Braman’s research focuses on information policy and its impact on society, law and technology. She is author or co-editor of a number of books in the area, as well as four special journal issues. She has written numerous articles in the top journals of the communication and information fields.

She has held visiting professorships and fellowships in both the U.S. and internationally. Her research has been funded by the Ford Foundation, the National Science Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation.

Because of her interdisciplinary approach, her work has been cited and is taught in classes in communication, information science, sociology, law and legal studies, political science, international relations, economics and the arts.

“Through her sustained and productive program of research, Professor Braman has not simply contributed to the field of information policy, she has been instrumental in defining that field, and in shaping national and international policy,” writes Michele H. Jackson, director of the University of Colorado’s ASSETT (Arts and Sciences Support of Education Through Technology) program.

John L. Isbell
Professor, Geosciences

john-isbell John Isbell is a sedimentologist internationally known for his work in the Late Paleozoic Ice Age that occurred 326 to 306 million years ago and is regarded as the longest glacial event since the evolution of animals.

His particular expertise on this period centers on the continents of the Southern Hemisphere that once composed the supercontinent called Gondwana. Isbell’s work has set forth a wellreasoned challenge to conventional wisdom about the history of glaciation in this area, the best analog scientists have for examining the Earth’s transition from icehouse to greenhouse conditions.

“This body of research clearly establishes him as a major player in the community of scientists working on climate issues, and a leader amongst those working on Gondwana glaciation,” says one nominator.

His record of funded research and frequency of his fieldwork is hard to match. He has been continuously funded by the National Science Foundation—13 grants—since 1990. He also has been a leader or team member on international research projects on three modern continents, notably on 14 trips to Antarctica.

2009-2010

John D. Buntin
Professor, Biological Sciences

buntin It is very difficult to get a regular research grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and even more difficult to have it renewed over several funding periods. John Buntin’s main NIH grant was funded without interruption for more than 20 years.

Perhaps most striking, however, is that he received an NIH Merit Award from 1989-2000, which places him in the very top group of NIH investigators.

Buntin has established himself as an international authority on the actions of the hormone prolactin on the central nervous system. It is an avenue of research that would have discouraged many. How this hormone is able to affect processes that are presumably controlled by the brain has been a big mystery in the field of neuroscience.

Buntin has contributed more to solving this mystery than anyone else, and has advanced understanding of hormone-brain interactions more broadly.

He has made fundamental breakthroughs in understanding prolactin’s central regulation of parental care at the cellular and molecular level. Many of these advances have been made possible by the systematic and insightful way Buntin has developed and characterized a unique avian model to approach these questions.

“While I think John deserves this award based only on his academic accomplishments in neuroendocrinology,” says one nominator, “I think there are also several other reasons he should receive it. One of these is in recognition for his continued tangible contributions to the development of UWM as a serious research university and, more specifically, to the growth of neuroscience on campus.”

Michael F. Fendrich
Director, Center for Addiction and Behavioral Health Research
Professor, Social Work

fendrich As director of the Center for Addiction and Behavioral Health Research (CABHR) and a member of the social work faculty since 2005, Michael Fendrich has brought a number of initiatives and grants to UWM and moved CABHR forward as a national center researching addictions and mental health.

While developing proposals for cutting-edge research examining substance abuse, Fendrich has become a nationally recognized expert and has served on national panels for federal agencies. In addition, he is on the editorial boards of two major addiction journals and is working on a number of federally funded projects—including an evaluation of Milwaukee’s first drug treatment court.

Other projects include an important linkage to private industry conducting research on a new biomarker for heavy alcohol consumption. “This is an example of a public-private partnership to address a serious issue facing the community and private business,” says Stan Stojkovic, dean of the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare.

In addition to making presentations to community agencies and national entities, Fendrich was pivotal in organizing a national conference held at UWM on high-risk drinking and the importance of a prevention message to students, a collaboration between CABHR and MillerCoors.

Under his leadership, CABHR has expanded its focus to include researchers in nursing, communication, psychology and gerontology. This has led to the creation of an ongoing summer research methods seminar, encouraging research competency among faculty and mentoring relationships on campus.

A milestone for CABHR was the recent establishment of the Community Research Center in Milwaukee’s central city, a move that clearly demonstrates the importance Fendrich and other CABHR researchers place on university-community collaboration.


Marleen C. Pugach
Professor, Curriculum & Instruction
pugachThe faculty of the Department of Curriculum & Instruction unanimously nominated Marleen Pugach for the Senior Faculty Award.

“Dr. Pugach is one of the most respected scholars, nationally and internationally, in the area of collaboration between general and special educators,” wrote colleague Linda Post, associate professor of education. “Her advocacy for models of inclusion for special education students is a consistent theme throughout her work.

“Pugach, who joined UWM in 1986, has focused her research and work on ways of helping children with special needs learn in the least restrictive environment. Pugach’s research and writing continues to have a tremendous impact on teacher education, generally, and on special education, wrote colleague Linda Blanton, professor at Florida International University.

Her research and writing have focused on ways to help teachers integrate children with special needs into “regular” classrooms, looking at such topics as collaboration among general and special education teachers, team teaching and preparation of special education teachers in content areas.

Her work has been recognized nationally with the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education’s (AACTE) Margaret B. Lindsey Award for Distinguished Research in Teacher Education and the TED/Merrill Award from the Teacher Education Division of the Council for Exceptional Children.

Pugach has been a visiting scholar at the University of Otago in New Zealand and at Arizona State University. She received a Fulbright for work and research as a senior specialist at the University of Alberta.

Most recently, she and Blanton have been working with the AACTE and the Council of Chief State School Officers to study collaborative programs in general and special education. From that work, they have developed an action guide for policy makers.

Vladislav V. Yakovlev
Professor, Physics

yakovlev Vladislav Yakovlev has made important advancements in optical spectroscopy both from an engineering and a scientific perspective, and has pioneered the development of techniques that have set the pace in the field of ultrafast optics for 20 years.

Yakovlev’s research is focused on applications of advanced optical spectroscopy to biological and medical imaging that can provide immediate knowledge of chemical content.

His discoveries have helped move ultrafast femto­second lasers from use only as laboratory tools to systems that solve real-world problems—in this case, some of the very first work using femtosecond lasers for surgery.

In fact, says one nominator, “His contributions to the fields of nanoscale optical imaging of sub-cellular structures, protein structural chemistry and biomedical applications of the optical technology are known throughout the world.”

Examples of Yakovlev’s work have been highlighted in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences as well as in the top journals in the field.

In addition, he has developed strong ties to world-renowned collaborators, which allows him to continually link new breakthroughs in spectroscopy to applications in medicine and biology, generating a large number of research proposals. He currently has two active grants from the National Science Foundation, three from the National Institutes of Health and one from the U.S. Department of Defense.

“This brings your institution a very strong applied optics and spectroscopy program,” says one nomina­tor, “and a direct linkage to biomedical device engineering and development.”

2008-2009


Margo J. Anderson
Professor, Department of History
andersonAs the country’s leading scholar on the history of the U.S. Census, Margo Anderson has made distinguished contributions to research in American social science.

Her research on the past censuses shows how current events have affected or changed the process, and how social prejudices have tainted the count throughout its history.

Anderson has worked tirelessly to explain the significance of the census process to questions of social inequality, both through her many publications, including three books, and by testifying before Congress.

In addition, she has most recently been involved in promoting scholarship on Milwaukee. This work took off in 2004 when she organized a conference on Milwaukee history in conjunction with the meeting of the Urban History Association here.

Her scholarly contributions have been recognized by a variety of professional organizations. She was a member of the National Academy of Sciences’ Panel on Census Requirements for the Year 2000 and Beyond. In addition, she has held fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, D.C.


Margaret Duncan
Professor, Department of Human Movement Sciences
duncanMargaret Duncan is known nationally and internationally for her research into the sociocultural aspects of sport and physical activity.From earlier work on gendered bodies and media portrayals, to work on sport and ability/disability, to more recent work on the social construction of obesity, she has drawn upon the most recent constructs and theoretical orientations in a variety of disciplines.Her work has spanned the fields of sociology, anthropology, health and kinesiology, psychology, history, cultural studies and gender studies to advance research and professional practice in human movement sciences.Another noteworthy aspect of Duncan’s research is her desire to share the findings of her work with students. Through mentoring of graduate students across campus departments, she has helped students translate research into professional practice.

Duncan is an Active Fellow of the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education, the most prestigious honorary organization in the U.S. for scholars in kinesiology. Membership is limited to 140 Active Fellows; to be elected, a candidate must demonstrate long-term scholarly productivity at the highest level.


Paul J. Roebber
Professor, Department of Mathematical Sciences
roebberPaul Roebber is regarded as one of the leading forecasting experts in the United States and the world, and his research has affected how future weather is determined today.

Roebber’s research has led to an improved method for forecasting snowfall which has recently been adopted as the standard methodology by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association’s Hydrometeorological Prediction Center.

In addition, his research group was the first to show that high-resolution weather prediction models can reliably predict the occurrence, mode and timing of thunderstorms within a region 24 to 48 hours in advance.

Roebber also is widely regarded for his teaching expertise and for finding effective ways for his students to be actively involved in research. In the last two years, he created a program in which both undergraduate and graduate students provide targeted forecasts to local businesses. Eight clients, including We Energies, are signed up, and the contracts with these businesses are leading to new ways to support students in atmospheric science.

Research in the Humanities Award (Biennial)

Description: Former Associate Dean for Research Robert A. Jones and his spouse, Mary B. Jones, established the Research in the Humanities Award at the UWM Foundation for the purpose of recognizing outstanding scholarship and research in the Humanities.

The award recipient will have demonstrated a comprehensive grasp of the subject(s) of inquiry and research and will have made a substantive contribution to humanistic thought through a monograph or other scholarly publication during the two years prior to the award year.

In each odd-numbered year, the Office of Research solicits award nominations of faculty members in the Humanities (see below for eligible departments). The faculty member selected for the award is honored at the Fall Awards Ceremony and receive a $1,500 prize.

Eligibility and Selection

  • Faculty members in the Departments of Africology; Art History; Communication; English; Foreign Languages and Literature; French, Italian, and Comparative Literature; History; Journalism, Advertising, and Media Studies; Linguistics; Philosophy; Spanish and Portuguese.
  • Author of monograph published during the two years prior to the award year.

The Vice Provost for Research, the Associate Dean of Humanities in L&S, and the Chair of the Division of Arts and Humanities Executive Committee will comprise the Selection Committee.

Nomination Procedure

Calls for nomination are generally issued in February of each award year, with a March deadline. For more information, send e-mail to anagamez@uwm.edu or call 414-229-5218.

Past Recipients

2013

Tanya Tiffany,
Associate Professor, Art History

tanya-tiffanyTanya Tiffany’s 2012 book, Diego Velázquez’s Early Paintings and the Culture of Seventeenth-Century Seville, provides the most in-depth look to date into the early career of one of Western art’s greatest artists.

By considering his work within the context of Seville’s social, political and religious environment of the day, Tiffany reveals the issues that many of Velázquez’s paintings address, such as women’s place in society, the nature of artistic creativity, the role of religion in everyday life, and the incorporation of racial minorities into Christianity.

Laura Bass of Brown University describes Tiffany as “one of today’s most important scholars of Velázquez.” Citing its “rigorous research” of a wide variety of textual sources and “meticulous attention to pictorial composition,” Bass writes that Tiffany’s book will be “indispensable to students and scholars not only of art history but also of early modern Spanish culture more broadly.”

Since coming to UWM in 2004, Tiffany’s university awards include travel grants from College of Letters and Science, Center for International Education, and Graduate School, a Center for 21st Century Studies Fellowship, and a Graduate School Research Committee Award. She also earned a UW System Institute on Race and Ethnicity Research Support Grant and a fellowship from UW-Madison’s Institute for Research in the Humanities.

Barrett Kalter
Associate Professor, English

barrett-kalter-originalIn Modern Antiques: The Material Past in England, 1660-1780, Barrett Kalter examines the influence of antiquarianism on English literature, architecture, and interior design during the long eighteenth century.

Inspired by the history that scholars and collectors had recovered in such concrete detail, artists and writers combined fact with imagination, and old with new, to create works ranging from medieval-style wallpaper to the Gothic novel. These “modern antiques” were valued as exotic alternatives to the present, yet they also embody the changes that define the era, such as the legitimization of empirical knowledge, the spread of consumer culture, and the rise of British nationalism. Kalter argues that the proliferation of “modern antiques” in the period reveals modernity’s paradoxical emergence out of encounters with the past.

Robert Folkenflik, professor emeritus of English at the University of California-Irvine, calls Kalter’s work “an original and necessary book for eighteenth-century studies” whose chapters “give us a rigorously considered sense of the historical imagination of the eighteenth century.”

Since coming to UWM in 2004, Kalter’s university awards include travel grants from the Center for International Education and the Graduate School, and a Center for 21st Century Studies Fellowship.

Kalter’s works in progress include a monograph on food and eighteenth-century literature.

2011

Jasmine Alinder
Associate Professor, History

jasmine-alinderJasmine Alinder’s 2009 book, Moving Images: Photography and the Japanese American Incarceration, examines the ways in which photographs of the Japanese American incarceration were made, exhibited and seen from multiple perspectives—those of photographers, subjects and exhibitors—both then and later. As such, it is a history of how photographic meaning is not given but constructed—often subject to deeply ideological constraints.Published by University of Illinois Press, Alinder’s book has established her as one of the most important and influential scholars in the burgeoning areas of public history, visual culture and museum studies. Moving Images has received high critical acclaim, praising the author’s sophistication and imagination in developing a history of documentary photography that displays the complex interrelations between visual and ideological contexts.John Howard of King’s College London writes: “[T]his book is a credit to the press, the series editor and the author. Alinder’s keen insights will continue to inform and enhance the field for years to come.”Sukanya Banerjee
Associate Professor, English

sukanya-banerjeeSukanya Banerjee’s 2010 book, Becoming Imperial Citizens: Indians in the Late Victorian Empire, combines Victorian studies, postcolonial history and literary analysis with meticulous archival research to investigate the ways in which Indians fashioned conceptions of themselves as citizens in the British Empire, more than half a century before the founding of their own nation-state.Published by Duke University Press, the book provides a new transnational and extralegal framework for understanding the colonial subject and the global reach and complexity of Indian society in the late Victorian period.Calling it a “virtuoso performance,” Antoinette Burton of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign writes that Becoming Imperial Citizens “is indispensable reading for those who want to understand the timing of nationalisms sponsored by colonial modernity.”Banerjee’s book was a culmination of research that included a UWM Center for 21st Century Studies fellowship in 2003-04. In addition to many external honors and awards, other UWM awards include a fellowship at the Center for Women’s Studies, two Graduate School Research Committee Awards, an NEH summer research award and four UWM travel grants.

2009

William Bristow
Associate Professor, Philosophy
william-bristowGeorg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel was a 19th century German idealist philosopher whose ideas and concepts, including dialectic, absolute idealism, ethical life and sublation, challenged many ideas of the prominent German idealist Immanuel Kant.

Scholars have long struggled to fully understand Hegel’s criticisms of Kant, and William Bristow’s 2007 book, Hegel and the Transformation of Philosophical Critique, has been called “the most successful account so far” of Hegel’s arguments.

Published by Oxford University Press, the world’s leading publisher in philosophy, the book was the subject of the “Author Meets Critics” session of the 2009 American Philosophical Association meeting, the profession’s most distinguished venue for discussion of new books. It was also nominated for the APA’s Annual Book Prize.

In a review, Paul Franks of the University of Toronto calls Bristow’s book “a brilliant defense of Hegel, indispensable reading for anyone interested in Kant and Hegel,” adding that, “It also presents a breathtaking vision of epistemology.”

Aims McGuinness
Associate Professor, History

aims-mcguinnessWith the writing of Path of Empire: Panama and the California Gold Rush, Aims McGuinness has confirmed his place in the front ranks of researchers in the burgeoning field of global history.

This assessment by UWM History Department Chair Neal Pease is just one voice in the chorus of accolades the book has received since its 2008 publication.

Path of Empire describes the Gold Rush’s impact on Panama, an important route for U.S. westward expansion even before the building of the canal in 1914. Robert Buffington, professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder, calls Path of Empire “a pioneering work of transnational history that significantly revises our understanding of this hemispherechanging event.”

McGuinness conducted research on Panama and the United States as a Center for 21st Century fellow in 2003-04, and delivered the 2004 Fromkin Lecture, which focused on Milwaukee’s socialist history.

2007

John Koethe
Professor, Philosophy

Photo John KoethePerhaps best known as a poet—author of seven books of poetry and recipient of numerous awards—UWM Distinguished Professor John Koethe reminds us of his importance as a philosopher with his 2005 book, Scepticism, Knowledge, and Forms of Reasoning.

Described by UWM colleague Edward Hinchman as “a groundbreaking contribution to several issues in epistemology, metaphysics, and the philosophy of logic,” the book examines skeptical arguments, a matter on which there is no consensus among contemporary philosophers.

How do you respond to a philosophical argument that contradicts your common-sense knowledge, such as an assertion that you cannot know that you are at this very moment sitting at a computer? Rather than denying the premises of such arguments or simply declaring them invalid, Koethe delves into what such arguments reveal about the nature of reasoning itself.

Ohio State University philosophy professor Robert Kraut calls Koethe’s book “an excellent study of epistemological skepticism—one of the most intriguing discussions of the topic to appear in many years” and “a wonderful piece of systematic philosophy.”

Scepticism, Knowledge, and Forms of Reasoning was preceded by Koethe’s 1996 book The Continuity of Wittgenstein’s Thought and several important scholarly articles, which include “And They Ain’t Outside the Head Either” in 1992, “The Stability of Reference over Time” in 1982, and “Putnam’s Argument Against Realism” in 1979.

Koethe has taught and written at UWM since 1973, when he received his Ph.D. from Harvard University.