Prince Baskettail dragonfly

Greetings, BugFans, The BugLady finds this wonderful dragonfly cruising tirelessly over cattails at the edges of lakes or patrolling long stretches of the Milwaukee River about six feet above the surface. She takes a lot of Hail Mary shots, and …

Red-blue Checkered beetle

Greetings, BugFans, The BugLady is always amazed at how masses of Coreopsis flowers paint the Riveredge prairies gold in June, and she’s equally amazed at how few of them are entertaining insects. The books say that that Coreopsis is visited …

Closed for June – The Dark Side

Howdy, BugFans, It’s the last post of June and the final “do-it-yourself” BOTW for a while. Here are some stories about some of the seamier aspects of bugs. OK – this is like watching a train wreck. Enjoy the video …

Closed for June – A Potpourri

Howdy, BugFans, Here’s another potpourri of news from the insect world. OK – one more cicada story – with a twist. And some excellent footage of predaceous diving beetles (do we still use the word “footage” in the day of …

Closed for June – A Combination of Ingredients

Howdy, BugFans, They are not here in God’s Country (yet), but here’s the latest on Asian murder hornets. The BugLady assumes that there’s a murder hornet horror movie in production somewhere. And here’s a nice visual. But wait! All is …

Closed for June – Insects and Plants

Greetings, BugFans, There’s a “chicken-or-the-egg” question about pollinators—do pollinators adapt to the flowers they visit, or do flowers adapt to their pollinators? Yes, pollinators do visit flowers that are a good fit for their various feeding apparatuses, but in an …

Closed for June – Brood X

Howdy, BugFans, A few years ago, the BugLady wrote an article about entomophagy – the fine art of cooking and eating insects. In the past, the emergence of a big brood of cicadas has signaled recipe contests, and so, as …

Taiga Bluet Damselfly

Howdy, BugFans, It’s spring, and it’s time to brush up on our bluet damselfly IDs because they’re starting to hit the airways. Most bluets are 1″ to 1.3″ long and, as their name suggests, males are at least partly blue …

Bombylius Bee Fly

Greetings, BugFans, What a treat to come across one of these fuzzy little flies sipping nectar from a spring flower! Bee flies are said to get their name from the fact that they are bee mimics that look and buzz …

Cellophane bee

Howdy, BugFans, Let us celebrate native bees, those often unobtrusive and always invaluable pollinators that make possible much of our landscape and many of our crops.  Unfortunately, although she’s always photographing fuzzy little bees, the BugLady is pretty inept at …