In the News

Inside the Mind of White America

The concept of there being “two Americas” is almost as old as the nation itself. That divide has been economic but also racial, with minorities claiming a disproportionately small share of the nation’s substantial wealth. Amid the current backdrop of the Black Lives Matter movement and increasing wealth disparity, Clive Myrie from the BBC’s This Week’s World delves into what white Americans understand–or don’t–about race.

Watershed Study Analyzes State of Milwaukee’s Latino Community

It probably comes as no surprise to hear that the Latino population in the Milwaukee area is skyrocketing. But for that basic statistic, the issues facing the Latino community in particular have been under-studied. That’s all changed with the release of a watershed study. Latino Milwaukee: A Statistical Portrait was commissioned by the Greater Milwaukee Foundation and conducted by UWM’s Center for Economic Development.

Study details Latino impact on Metro Milwaukee

The population of Milwaukee would be shrinking if not for the growth of the Latino population, while Latino workers have accounted for all net growth in employment in the four-county area during the last 25 years. A new study commissioned by the Greater Milwaukee Foundation offers an unprecedented look at conditions in the Latino community and the trends that continue to shape the region.

Too Many Candles: Milwaukee Gun Violence

Gun-related violence in Milwaukee spiked in 2015. This documentary examines the response by law enforcement and elected officials to the rise in violent crime, and explores programs providing hope for a city working to empower communities to reverse systemic forces of poverty, incarceration and crime.

Milwaukee-area Latino population skyrockets

The population of Latinos in metropolitan Milwaukee increased 213% between 1990 and 2014, the overwhelming majority of whom were born in the United States, according to a new study released Thursday. The study, “Latino Milwaukee: A Statistical Portrait,” provides a comprehensive statistical look at metropolitan Milwaukee’s Latino community, from population growth and language use, to employment, income, education and business ownership. The study was conducted by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Center for Economic Development.

Study: Milwaukee Area’s Latino Population Has Tripled

The Milwaukee metro area’s Latino population more than tripled between the years 1990 and 2014, according to a study funded by the Greater Milwaukee Foundation. The community’s growth accounted for the vast majority of the region’s population grown since 1990 and increases in the area’s school district enrollment, according to the study. The study also found Milwaukee has one of the largest cultural generation gaps of any large U.S. city. More than 85 percent of the region’s residents who are over the age of 65 are white while 51 percent of children younger than 5 are non-white.

Latino population accounts for all of area’s net growth, study finds

The Latino population is responsible for all of the Milwaukee metro area’s net growth in both population and employment during the last 25 years, a study has found. The Greater Milwaukee Foundation released the results of a study examining the four-county Milwaukee metropolitan area’s Latino population Thursday morning. The study, called “Latino Milwaukee: A Statistical Portrait” was commissioned by the Greater Milwaukee Foundation and completed by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Center for Economic Development.

An unlikely alliance to connect Milwaukee job-seekers to employers

Christopher Lane’s employment prospects were bleak. In 2015, the 45-year-old former felon lost a Milwaukee city government job when he was arrested on a charge that later was dropped. With a 20-year prison term for armed robbery on his record, Lane found his opportunities limited to temp work and side jobs. Then a chance encounter rekindled his hope.

Wisconsin heads to the polls a state divided

Wisconsin heads to the polls Tuesday as a state divided. It’s a swing state that’s gone blue in every election since 1988, but the government is under full Republican control. Governor Scott Walker ran a flash-in-the-pan presidential campaign, but only after surviving a brutal recall fight. The state also borders two metropolitan areas — Minneapolis-St. Paul and Chicago — so economically powerful they’re distorting Wisconsin’s key indicators.

‘Back in time 60 years’: America’s most segregated city

Segregation. The word conjures images of the Deep South, a Jim Crow past of snarling police dogs and whites-only toilets. In fact, it is a national problem that has long outlasted the era of openly racist law. It persists, five decades after the U.S. government passed the anti-discrimination Fair Housing Act. It persists under the country’s first black president. It persists in a place barely farther south than Toronto.