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Jeremiah Favara

Visiting Assistant Professor
Women's & Gender Studies
 Curtin Hall 527

Education

PhD, Media Studies, University of Oregon (Eugene), 2017
MS, Gender, Development and Globalization, London School of Economics and Political Science (London), 2011
BS, Montana State University (Bozeman), 2005

Courses Taught

WGS 301: Queer Theory
WGS 302: Gendered Bodies: Cowboys & Tough Guys: Masculinities & Media
WGS 410: Feminist Theory
WGS 500: Advanced Social Science Seminar in Women’s and Gender Studies: Queer of Color Critique
WGS 710: Advanced Feminist Theory
WGS 799: Advanced Topics and Women’s and Gender Studies: Queer Theory
LGBT 290: Topics in LGBT Studies: The Queer Midwest

Academic Interests

Feminist media studies and queer studies with focus on intersecting dynamics of gender, sexuality, race, class and other forms of difference.

Grants, Awards and Honors

  • Outstanding Service to Community Award, LGBT Education and Support Services, University of Oregon, 2016
  • Lorey I. Lokey Scholarship, School of Journalism and Communication, University of Oredon, 2016
  • Miller Family Scholarship, Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, University of Oregon, 2016
  • John Furr Fellowship for J. Walker Thompson Research, Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising and Marketing History, Duke University, 2016
  • Warren C. Price Award for Best Graduate Paper in Media History, University of Oregon, 2015
  • Center for the Study of Women in Society Graduate Research Grant, University of Oregon, 2015

Selected Publications

  • Favara, Jeremiah and Caitlyn Kawamura.  “Let’ Be Abominable Feminists: Yeti: Campus Stories and Sexism in the Digital College Party Scene.” Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology 10 (2016): Doi: 10.7264/N3SF2TGJ.
  • Favara, Jeremiah. “Gods and Freaks, Soldiers and Men: Gender and Technology in The Avengers.” In Marvel Comics Into Film, 177-88. McFarland Press, 2016.
  • Favara, Jeremiah. “A Maternal Heart: Angelia Jolie, Choices of Maternity, and Hegemonic Femininity in People Magazine.” Feminist Media Studies 14, no. 4 (2015): 626-42.