Danielle Romain, PhD

Assistant Professor
Criminal Justice & Criminology

Dr. Danielle Romain is an assistant professor in the Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology. Dr. Romain's primary research focuses on decision-making in criminal courts, as well as the experiences of victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. She has taught undergraduate courses including Introduction to Criminal Justice, Criminal Court Process, Crime and Criminal Justice Policy, Victimology, Women and the Criminal Justice System, Violence and the Criminal Justice System, and Research Methods. She has also taught a graduate course in Measuring Crime and Analyzing Crime Data.

Dr. Romain has previous experience as a victims' advocate working with domestic violence victims to meet their safety, housing, and referral needs. She has assisted on evaluations of programs aimed at increasing juvenile’s perceptions of police, as well as examining disparities in prosecutorial and judicial case processing in Midwestern and Southwestern jurisdictions. Her dissertation examined sanctioning decisions in domestic violence probation review hearings along the intersections of gender, race/ethnicity, and family status.

Education:

  • Ph.D., Urban Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 2017
  • M.S., Criminal Justice, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 2010
  • B.S., Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 2008

Research Interests:

  • Courts and sentencing
  • Prosecutorial discretion
  • Domestic violence
  • Sexual assault
  • Gender and racial disparities

Select Publications:

  • Freiburger, T. L., Romain, D. M., Randoll, B, & Marcum, C. D. (2017). Cheating behaviors among undergraduate college students: Results from a factorial survey. Journal of Criminal Justice Education, 28(2), 222-247.
  • Romain, D. M. & Freiburger, T. L. (2015). Chivalry revisited: Gender, race/ethnicity and offense type on domestic violence charge reduction.  Feminist Criminology, 1-32.
  • Romain, D. M. & Freiburger, T. L. (2013). Prosecutorial discretion for domestic violence cases: An examination of the effects of offender race, ethnicity, gender and age. Criminal Justice Studies, 26(3), 289-307.

Curriculum Vitae