Seminars – Architecture

Energy Design Fundamentals
ARCH 326 (technology, counts toward ecological design concentration)
(The University of Wisconsin – Madison, CEE 601-011)
Instructor:
Mark Keane
Architect – partner in Studio 1032 Architecture

RACE TO ZERO
ZERO NET ENERGY HOUSE: A Design Seminar

Seminar Fri 9:00 – 10:15, site visits, on-line programming

DOE is excited to join its two student building design competitions, Solar Decathlon and Race to Zero, into one national Solar Decathlon competition. The new competition will feature two Challenges: the Design Challenge (formerly Race to Zero) and the Build Challenge. Visit the Solar Decathlon website to learn the details. The Solar Decathlon Design Challenge is annual, and the Solar Decathlon Build Challenge is biennial. Zero Energy Ready Buildings have become readily achievable and cost-effective. By definition, these high-performance buildings are so energy-efficient that renewable power can offset most or all the annual energy consumption. The Race to Zero inspired collegiate students to become the next generation of building science professionals through a design challenge for zero energy ready buildings. The U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon® is a collegiate competition, comprising10 contests, that challenges student teams to design and build high performance and innovative buildings powered by renewable energy.

The Race to Zero was an annual competition from 2014-2018, open to students and faculty from any interested collegiate institution. The competition challenged collegiate teams to apply sound building science principles to create cost-effective, market-ready designs. Past Race to Zero resources will be available for reference to the presentations and project summaries from the past winning teams

UWM students will team with UW-Madison students from College of Engineering from the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The competition runs through the fall to spring semester with the presentation to the U.S. Department of Energy in Denver, Colorado, in April of 2020. Students who choose to participate in the fall seminar should strongly consider joining the spring semester studio, and if awarded, the build team in the summer of 2020.

2016 SARUP national award winning scheme
Introduction to Building Information Modeling (BIM)
ARCH 382 (practice)
Instructor:
Oscar Avila

Online Course

This course emphasizes hands-on skill development through in-class assignments; some lecture content is also included, which presents the theory behind the techniques. In general, this course examines how to design 3D models that simultaneously document the project in schedules and 2D architectural drawings. Topics include starting a project, modifying elements, and presenting models. By the conclusion of this course students will have built a BIM project from scratch and present multiple views of the model on an architectural sheet.

Course Goals

Become comfortable with the necessary tools and expand on a basic Revit knowledge.
Learn skills and various workflows using Revit in a work-environment.
Create a project in Revit and work through any issues that arise on that project.
Document, render, and create a presentation of that project. At the end of the course that project will be presented to the class.
Learn Revit and have fun doing so along the way.


Visible Certainty-Diagramming & Mapping Info
ARCH 390/790
Instructor:
Chris Cornelius

With information and data becoming increasingly available to architects and designers and a multitude of computational means of reading this information, it is becoming imperative that designers be able to interpret and translate this info into meaningful design inspiration. This course will focus on the importance, theory and fundamentals of diagramming and mapping information, space and concepts in a manner relevant to architects. Students will be asked to render visible their own areas of investigation. These may include studio projects, graduate thesis projects or other self-initiated interests.

Arch-390-790 - Chris Cornelius
Frank Lloyd Wright Design Language Seminar
ARCH 390/790
(University of Wisconsin – Madison, CEE 669-011)
Instructor:
Mark Keane
Director, Frank Lloyd Wright Initiative
Architect – partner in Studio 1032 Architecture

ARCH 390-790 students section – Hybrid (Wed noon – 1:20 and on-line)

CEE 669 students section 011 – Hybrid (on-line, open to all students, all majors) 3 credits : first 1 hr. meeting will be face to face in CEE building room, date and time TBD via e-mail

This course introduces students to the design language of Frank Lloyd Wright. Students will gain a beginning understanding of his architectural design process, his methods, tools and processes in building design and construction.

The semester design project will involve the design of a “Gift Box” to Wright – the traditional semester ending project at Taliesin for students studying under Wright. Through the design process students will gain an understanding of integrated systems of components, assemblies and sub-systems limited only to your imagination and your understanding of Wright.
Optional Sat field trips:

Spring Green, WI
Riverside Terrace
Taliesin
Romeo and Juliet
Tan-y-deri
Hillside Home and School

Racine, WI
ASB homes on Burnham
Hardy House
Johnson Wax Administration
Wingspread


Building Stories Through Film
ARCH 390/790
Instructor:
Adam Goss
Spirit of Space

Authentic communication between the architect and the public is threatened by imagery devoid of the real experience and without regard for the public that uses the space. Through an independent lens we can all become better storytellers and start to decode the architectural world. We will learn to reveal why design matters through film and other mediums. Building empathy for design and the people using it requires patience and an obsessive process that makes it possible to record sequences that mirror real life experiences. To add value to a place designers must take time to connect, communicate, and empathize with people outside the profession.

Rough Cut: Mass, Material Microclimate
ARCH 390/790
Instructor:
Alex Timmer (counts toward ecological design concentration)

Increasingly architects are asked to design buildings that address the environmental concerns of our contemporary and future condition. This is typically achieved through the adherence to well-established standards and guidelines. While programs like LEED have provided much-needed clarity; that clarity has come at the expense of a more comprehensive assessment and radical innovation. As William W. Braham notes, LEED has resulted an increase in the market penetration of environmentally focused practices, but it has done little to promote the fundamental change that is necessary. [1] This course seeks to resist these established approaches and instead advance our ability to address environmental concerns as designers through a dialogue with material. A dialogue that welcomes material agency as an active and critical participant by beginning the design process with material experimentation.

How do we use our advanced digital tools to better leverage such material processes? How might we as designers consider the entire life cycle of material, from matter to product, as the domain of the architect? To address these questions, we will be looking at the potential of wood and timber products for their thermodynamic, aesthetic and tectonic opportunities at various scales of production and fabrication. As part of this seminar, we will examine various contemporary timber products, the history of timber, and it potential future. Next students will leverage the fabrication facilities at school to produce prototypes that explore the generative assembly of mass timber technologies. Students will use this research to design a small pavilion. Past years research will be shared with the student in order to insure that we are expanding on the first year’s research.

[1] Braham, William W. Architecture and Systems Ecology: Thermodynamic Principles of Environmental Building Design, in Three Parts. Routledge, 2016.


Inclusive Design (Service Learning)
ARCH 390/790 – URBPLAN 692 (Service Learning)
Instructor:
Krisann Rehbein

This seminar will explore the multitude of ways that students can contribute to the revitalization of a commercial corridor in Milwaukee. Using Historic Mitchell Street on the south side as a case study, students will analyze existing conditions and businesses, meet with leaders from the Business Improvement District (BID) and the Department of City Development, and contribute to ongoing work that supports the District.

This course builds upon a program taking place in the Summer of 2019 where a group of six high school students employed through the City’s Earn & Learn summer youth internship program will propose a marketing and rebranding strategy for the street. The summer program, currently in its third year as a partnership with the Department of City Development’s planning and commercial corridors department, utilizes the unique perspective of young people to generate solutions for issues in the built environment. These youth-led concepts will be presented to the BID board in August. Through Service Learning work, we have the opportunity to realize some of the ideas generated by City teens.

The exact nature of the project we will focus on for this course is fluid as this point because our Service Learning objectives will take distinct objectives & outcomes from the summer program and work on implementation/actualization. The continuum of work from high school to college students collaborating to reimagine the future of historic retail districts in the City is very exciting!


Creative Design & Social Research
ARCH 533 (theory)
Instructor:
Brian Schermer

This course focuses on social research that inspires creative architectural design. Social research refers to investigations from psychology, sociology, anthropology and other fields that help us understand how physical settings influence the human body, mind, spirit, and community, as well as the success of any enterprise. Cutting edge firms around the world use and conduct their own social research to spur themselves and their clients to explore new design solutions, stay competitive, and to advance the field. We’ll survey both foundational and contemporary research that is relevant to firms that design sustainable communities, productive work environments, health care settings, housing, educational facilities, and so on. We’ll also hear directly from cutting edge researcher-designers. Students will explore strategies for translating research into design and gain expertise in social research in general and on a topic of their own choosing.


Charting the Post-Apocalyptic Landscape
ARCH 533 (theory) – URBPLAN 692
Instructor:
Ash Lettow

Remember, the end is ever present.

The end of the world lies within what we have built. The first debates between Voltaire and Rousseau as to the causes and effects of the 1755 Lisbon Earthquake dislodged extent conceptions about the chthonic and celestial origins of the End. In other words, the disaster was not just a singular Judgement but a constellation of natural events and human response. The earthquake exposed the new territories of contrived and actively constructed apocalypses. After the quake, the built environment became a means to register how and possibly why the world could end.

The apocalypse and its requisite “posts” have resurged as a topic of interest in mass entertainment and while these stories provoke relevant moral questions situated in seductive vistas of ruination and potential rebirth; they all share one thing in common. Each story emerged from and was informed by looking at the seemingly banal, contemporary world within which we dwell. In constructing their narratives, authors and artists place our world under visual and conceptual scrutiny to fabricate the ends of their composed worlds. However, they also identify specific, crucial elements of reconstruction to ensure that the end is never really the End.

Clouds, Spectres and Crowds, Charting the Post-Apocalyptic Landscape is an effort to locate the multifarious guises and subsident shapes of the end as it is latently described within the arc of modernity. Modernity needed to produce antiquity to advance and in turn embedded within itself, the properties of its varied forms of decline. The end of the world has become institutionalized, even polled to advance specific ends and privilege certain means of survival. Apocalypse has shifted beyond anticipatory notions of temple veils being torn from top to bottom or a descending New Jerusalem and has been placed squarely within the capitalist market in the hopes that there is no end to expansion. This course will not prepare you for the end of the world but as we explore and analyze our contemporary landscape along with its history, it may help you be conversant as to the provocative forms of its decline.

Remember, the end is ever present.


Fellowship Seminar
ARCH 533 (theory)
Instructor:
TBA

The Department of Architecture will be hiring a new Fellow for Fall 2019. Below is the advertisement for that position. We hope to have the information on the seminar by the end of April/beginning of May. Questions please reach out to Mo Zell.

TITLE: TBD
CONTENT: TBD
Fellowship Options:
Innovation in Design (IID) an opportunity to develop a thematic body of work within the context of studio teaching which focuses on innovative design praxis. The IID Fellowship links design research with studio pedagogy, using the studio as a laboratory for design investigation.
Advancing Contemporary Theories (ACT) an opportunity to take a leading role in the study and teaching of contemporary architectural theory. The ACT Fellowship links design studio and seminar instruction with research in timely architectural criticism in areas such as landscape urbanism, digital design theory, contemporary culture, etc.

Summary Statement:
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Architecture & Urban Planning (SARUP) offers one-year fellowships in the areas of design instruction and architectural research. The fellowships are geared toward focusing and expanding design research, energizing the architectural curriculum with current discourse, as well as confirming an academic career path for candidates in the formative stage of their professional lives. Innovative and emerging designers, architecture practitioners, and scholars are encouraged to conduct design research and to participate in the SARUP community through the teaching of studios and seminars. Each one-year, 12-month, fellowship includes teaching responsibilities that may focus on the Core studio curriculum at the undergraduate and graduate levels, as well as studio or seminar teaching related to the candidate’s area of interest. At the culmination of the fellowship term and with the support of a stipend, fellows are expected to complete a final project that can be disseminated at a national level. Fellowship recipients will be expected to deliver a lecture in the SARUP Guest Lecture Series, complete a monograph, and to prepare an exhibit in SARUP’s gallery.

Introduction to Historic Preservation
ARCH 560 (practice)
Instructor:
Matt Jarosz

It can be stated for certain that romantic sentimentality, which accepts and conserves ‘old monuments’ in a modern townscape, will come into real conflict with the necessary renewal of the housing and traffic system, which is what defines the city.

1926 Theo van Doesburg – Intellectual leader of the modern movement

In a planning policy that is based on achieving a synthesis there can be no place for too scrupulous a concern with monumental property, and the preservation of a monument will only be justified if its individual value is undeniable, if it does not stand in the way of vital social and economic developments and expanding traffic requirements.

1968 Mart Stam, Europe – Urban planning leader

This course offers students an introduction to the principles of historic preservation and adaptive reuse for application in professional practice. The loss of historic buildings and sites has reduced our collective sense of identification with the past and its ability to provide economic, social, and emotional well-being. This course examines both the theoretical principles of historic preservation as well as the practical challenges of keeping old buildings. By reviewing preservation initiatives of cities and countries from around the world, we become better equipped to develop solutions to our preservation challenges here at home. This course connects students with local, national, and international preservation organizations in order to take advantage of the latest scholarship on building retention and reuse. Additionally, this course tracks the latest technical developments in building research, documentation, restoration, and reuse. A special emphasis is on aggressive reuse of existing buildings and structures and the many challenges associated with their retention. This course, as part of the graduate concentration in preservation studies, will allow students to enter architectural practice with specialized skills to work both the private and public realms of historic preservation.

Emerging Digital Technology: Inside Revit
ARCH 583 (practice)
Instructor:
Dan Cesarz

While Revit is primarily used as a production tool in the industry, this course will look at some of its lesser explored benefits as a design and data analysis tool. Almost all firms both locally and globally are looking to use Revit for the information it contains outside of creating construction documents. There are inherent efficiencies in using the program as a data driven design tool that are just beginning to be explored in the industry.

This course will explore many of these benefits including: Revit category schedules, Revit rendering, Revit conceptual massing and schedules, real time rendering w/ Enscape, adaptive componentry within Revit, visual scripting with Dynamo, generative design w/ Fractal, energy simulation w/ Insight 360, collaboration plugins, point clouds and reality capture.

There will be one class dedicated to introductory into the Revit interface and its basic kit of parts. The goal is to introduce you to all that you can do with BIM. No experience is required for any of the software mentioned.

Image is a sample (the origami flock of birds) of the visual scripting this class will undertake – image courtesy of HGA
Research Methods in Architecture (Recommended for Masters)
ARCH 585 (practice – research methods – recommended for masters)
Instructor:
Whitney Moon

What is architectural research, and what are the methods used by both architectural historians and architects? This course aims to introduce advanced graduate students to the various modes of academic and creative research as it applies to the both the discipline and profession of architecture. Through readings, case studies, and guest lectures, students will be exposed to a variety of research methods including, but not limited to, archives, objects, site visits, and interviews. Students will complete a series of assignments (both written and non-written) pertaining to these methods, allowing them to develop a body of research pertaining to their individual interests and/or projects already in process. In addition to exposure to a range of architectural research methods exploring the epistemological foundations of our knowledge about the built environment, emphasis will be placed on experimental modes of output and criticism, ranging from podcasts and mockumentary films to screenplays and fiction.


Urban Design as Public Policy
ARCH 749 (practice) – URBPLAN 857
Instructor:
Carolyn Esswein

What makes cities great places to live, work, and play?
This seminar covers a variety of urban design topics and how regulations impact the built environment. Topics range from changing retail design from pop-ups to big boxes; complete streets designed for pedestrians, bicyclists, and autos; design features of public spaces, plazas, and parks; and form-based codes that are regulating how cities are redeveloping. Practice-based examples and exercises are balanced with theory of city planning and design. Class activities include a walking tour, street and neighborhood analysis, urban design code review, and an exercise where you apply design and regulation strategies for a local site.


The Built Environment and Real Estate Development
ARCH 780 (practice, required for real estate concentration)
Instructor:
Robert Monnat

A course providing an understanding of the relationships between economics and architectural design and skills in manipulation of variables in both areas on real projects.

Black, White, and Fifty Shades of Grey
ARCH 790
Instructor:
Brian Johnsen and Sebastian Schmaling

The carefully curated portfolio that an architect produces to showcase his or her built work usually constructs a sanitized version of reality, one that divorces the seductive imagery of the apparently flawless end product from the trials and tribulations inherent in the process of implementing design ideas in the physical world. Client preconceptions, code restrictions, budget constraints, construction mistakes, and even the weather – they all fundamentally impact the outcome of any architectural project but are generally edited out of the official project brief, thus allowing the architect to maintain an aura of omniscience and infallibility. This seminar will juxtapose the curated presentation of architecture with those back-stories that are otherwise omitted in public discourse. In a conversational setting, Brian Johnsen and Sebastian Schmaling, Fitzhugh Scott Distinguished Professors in Practice, will retrace the evolutionary histories of seminal projects from their practice and discuss the sometime bumpy roads that lead from initial concept ideation to actual buildings.

Seminars – Urban Planning

Inclusive Design
URBPLAN 692 – ARCH 390/790
Instructor:
Krisann Rehbein

This seminar will explore the multitude of ways that students can contribute to the revitalization of a commercial corridor in Milwaukee. Using Historic Mitchell Street on the south side as a case study, students will analyze existing conditions and businesses, meet with leaders from the Business Improvement District (BID) and the Department of City Development, and contribute to ongoing work that supports the District.

This course builds upon a program taking place in the Summer of 2019 where a group of six high school students employed through the City’s Earn & Learn summer youth internship program will propose a marketing and rebranding strategy for the street. The summer program, currently in its third year as a partnership with the Department of City Development’s planning and commercial corridors department, utilizes the unique perspective of young people to generate solutions for issues in the built environment. These youth-led concepts will be presented to the BID board in August. Through Service Learning work, we have the opportunity to realize some of the ideas generated by City teens.

The exact nature of the project we will focus on for this course is fluid as this point because our Service Learning objectives will take distinct objectives & outcomes from the summer program and work on implementation/actualization. The continuum of work from high school to college students collaborating to reimagine the future of historic retail districts in the City is very exciting!


Charting the Post-Apocalyptic Landscape
URBPLAN 692 – ARCH 533 (theory)
Instructor:
Ash Lettow

Remember, the end is ever present.

The end of the world lies within what we have built. The first debates between Voltaire and Rousseau as to the causes and effects of the 1755 Lisbon Earthquake dislodged extent conceptions about the chthonic and celestial origins of the End. In other words, the disaster was not just a singular Judgement but a constellation of natural events and human response. The earthquake exposed the new territories of contrived and actively constructed apocalypses. After the quake, the built environment became a means to register how and possibly why the world could end.

The apocalypse and its requisite “posts” have resurged as a topic of interest in mass entertainment and while these stories provoke relevant moral questions situated in seductive vistas of ruination and potential rebirth; they all share one thing in common. Each story emerged from and was informed by looking at the seemingly banal, contemporary world within which we dwell. In constructing their narratives, authors and artists place our world under visual and conceptual scrutiny to fabricate the ends of their composed worlds. However, they also identify specific, crucial elements of reconstruction to ensure that the end is never really the End.

Clouds, Spectres and Crowds, Charting the Post-Apocalyptic Landscape is an effort to locate the multifarious guises and subsident shapes of the end as it is latently described within the arc of modernity. Modernity needed to produce antiquity to advance and in turn embedded within itself, the properties of its varied forms of decline. The end of the world has become institutionalized, even polled to advance specific ends and privilege certain means of survival. Apocalypse has shifted beyond anticipatory notions of temple veils being torn from top to bottom or a descending New Jerusalem and has been placed squarely within the capitalist market in the hopes that there is no end to expansion. This course will not prepare you for the end of the world but as we explore and analyze our contemporary landscape along with its history, it may help you be conversant as to the provocative forms of its decline.

Remember, the end is ever present.


Urban Design as Public Policy
URBPLAN 857 – ARCH 749 (practice)
Instructor:
Carolyn Esswein

What makes cities great places to live, work, and play? This seminar covers a variety of urban design topics and how regulations impact the built environment. Topics range from changing retail design from pop-ups to big boxes; complete streets designed for pedestrians, bicyclists, and autos; design features of public spaces, plazas, and parks; and form-based codes that are regulating how cities are redeveloping. Practice-based examples and exercises are balanced with theory of city planning and design. Class activities include a walking tour, street and neighborhood analysis, urban design code review, and an exercise where you apply design and regulation strategies for a local site.


Design Studios

Mixed Undergraduate/Graduate

Adaptive Reuse – Architecture of Additions
ARCH 650/850
Instructor:
Matt Jarosz
BSAS students enroll in ARCH 650
M.Arch students enroll in ARCH 850

This studio focuses on the interrelated problems of historic preservation, adaptive reuse, and the design of new construction. These issues are investigated through design interventions in complicated and controversial physical, social, and political settings. The semester includes three different types of preservation design challenges. The studio, as in past years, will include a 4 day, voluntary study tour to Quebec City, San Francisco, or New York.

Project #1: Building Documentation and Analysis. The first project will be the documentation and research of a landmark building, challenging students to understand the historic artifact through laser scans, drones, photographs, research, AutoCAD drawing creation, and existing conditions analysis. This project will elevate student understanding of existing construction and the challenges of retention in a hands-on field workshop setting with professional, practicing craftsmen and preservation companies.

Project #2: The Architecture of Expansion: The second project will be a design intervention challenge. We will be using an existing, vacant, historic Milwaukee building and proposing a new use. Interventions will be aggressive and dramatic and will include internal modifications of structure and layout along with rooftop expansion and wall penetrations with new sheathing and building enclosure systems. The focus will be on manipulating and modifying the existing through a powerful collision of new and old technologies and aesthetics.

Project #3: The Architecture of Additions: The last project will be a new addition to an existing international landmark building. Students will be able to choose a historic building and site in Japan or the ongoing studies being conducted at SARUP for an addition to Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unity Temple in Oak Park, Illinois. This project, like the previous two, will include extensive examination of the existing through a series of site visits and guest lectures.

The purpose of the studio is to go beyond the hypothetical and to use real programs and real budget constraints to address matters of design, heritage research, technology, and building construction with extant buildings and environments. These existing conditions will not merely serve as the default backdrop for new design interventions, but will, in fact, determine the most appropriate reuse function and visual expression for a new generation. Included Our philosophical partners in this undertaking will be the vast and growing collection of visionary leaders who understand that existing buildings need to be the baseline component of smart growth.

In this studio the designer will function as both a technical and social researcher, understanding an existing historic building on a much deeper level than is required of other design studios. Design proposals will be generated by a keen understanding of the existing buildings, their material reality, the architects and artists responsible for their creation, and their importance as a cultural treasure. Analysis and synthesis will be both technical and theoretical, with design proposals avoiding neo-historicism and advancing the matter of contemporary building technologies, just as the historic artifact that we are working with had done. This approach is the only way to generate truly creative, engaging, and intelligent proposals.


Milwaukee Environmental Justice Research
ARCH 650/850
Instructor:
Arijit Sen
BSAS students enroll in ARCH 650
M.Arch students enroll in ARCH 850

This is a research studio investigating the dynamics of climate and environmental justice. The studio team will explore Milwaukee’s North Side (Washington Park, Sherman Park, Martin Drive, Midtown, and Metcalf Park area) to identify case studies that explain how issues of environmental and climate justice influence the production and experience of our everyday built environment. During the studio, we will work with community leaders and environmental scholars to map, document, identify, and problematize case studies that exemplify the complexities of environmental justice in our study area. Students will conduct considerable secondary research and readings.

The Fall 2019 studio will focus on urban acupuncture — planning small catalytic projects, on-site installations, and planned interventions. They will work with community residents and other stakeholders. Our goal is to articulate “design methods” and research methods that may help us understand how design can respond to environmental problems. We ask, “Who do we design for and how do we produce equitable design? What are the rules, moves, and processes that constitute the language of equitable design practice?”


Something Completely Different
ARCH 650/850
Instructor:
Filip Tejchman
BSAS students enroll in ARCH 650
M.Arch students enroll in ARCH 850

What is this studio about?
Something Completely Different focuses on inventing the future of practice through an examination of the economics of sustainability, the environmental impact of construction and project delivery, and the possibilities of design as entrepreneurship. Underlying the premise of this studio is the belief that the institutions of practice inform the ways that buildings are designed, built, and consumed; if we want to create architecture that promotes change, then the practice of architecture must be changed.

With that modest purpose in mind, Something Completely Different will look at how shifting the focus of practice from providing a service to delivering a product can lead to new architectural programs, types, systems, specifications, and models of construction.

What will be designed?
Two projects will be developed simultaneously. The interrelationship between buildings and practice is the conceptual site for the semester and will serve as the locus for your proposed Architectural “Start-Up.” By applying the Lean Launchpad and Business Canvas methods to the design process you will identify your audience and market, as well as get a better understanding of your project constraints. This will occur in parallel to a design-to-product exploration of the architectures of pleasure. Why pleasure? Aren’t there more demanding and urgent quotidian pressures that Architecture can address? Pleasure may seem superfluous, but it is almost universal in its appeal to a diverse and varied audience. The architectures of pleasure also happen to be disproportionately distributed regionally and nationally. Moreover, the architectural design opportunities of pleasure can address environmental and economic challenges in ways that negate many of the burdens and assumptions of the ideologies associated with the late 20th-century modernist project.

What about the process?
Something Completely Different is interested in developing design processes that are based on research done in the field. The design studio is an incredible ideas incubator, but it is a terrible place to test ideas because it is a bubble. We will introduce the research methods used by start-ups to develop ideas into products and support this through field trips, workshops, and charrettes that take us out of the studio and into the world we desire to transform.

The (un)Making of the Museum
ARCH 650/850
Instructor:
Mo Zell
BSAS students enroll in ARCH 650
M.Arch students enroll in ARCH 850

This studio uses the museum exhibition as a vehicle to question and provoke issues relevant to architecture, culture and society. Architecture as a discipline unites formal and social issues in the construction of cities, buildings, spaces, and experiences. Using the museum collection as a context in which to research, question and construct narratives, students are provided an opportunity to exploit the connection between pleasure and necessity as they relate to objects (collection), installation (form + materials) and culture (society).

Students will be (un)making the museum by MAKING a series of nontraditional exhibits – ones that provoke new ways of seeing and understanding art and space. This is a design/build studio. Students will be constructing three projects at full-scale with real materials. The first two installations will respond to the site of the body and our school. The final installation will be built onsite at the Chipstone Foundation in Fox Point.

Weekly visits to local and regional museums will be part of the studio including in-depth discussions with museum curators. An interest in physically making things and teamwork is a must.
Chipstone funding is provided for final installations.


Milwaukee’s Best
ARCH 650/850
Instructor:
Kyle Reynolds
BSAS students enroll in ARCH 650
M.Arch students enroll in ARCH 850

In 1984, SITE designed the final BEST big box store in Milwaukee on Brown Deer Rd and 85th St. for the founders of the company Sydney and Frances Lewis. The inside/outside store, as it came to be known, was ahead of its time; producing a radical take on the nature of mass consumerism and the architectural potential latent within this distinctly American building typology. It was, arguably, the best BEST design and yet its life was relatively short, a harbinger of things to come. The BEST company put an end to their signature showrooms and found it difficult to adapt to a changing retail market. The Milwaukee store closed in 1988, just 4 years after its opening, and exists today as a K&G Superstore with some distinct traces of its original design still intact.

In this studio, we will use Milwaukee’s BEST store as a site for design intervention. Big box stores are closing in droves throughout the American suburban, urban, and exurban contexts; leaving behind millions of square feet of unused building stock ripe for reinvestment. Rather than wiping the slate clean – which brings both economic and ecological degradation, the premise of this studio will operate from the standpoint that this context and these buildings are worth adapting. The big box is a distinctly American building typology and its potential was only hinted at in the work of SITE before transitioning to the ultra-mundane typologies we know today.

The city of Milwaukee is looking to the vast number of unused big box stores along Brown Deer road to develop pilot programs for adaptive reuse and incubator spaces. Building on this trajectory we will design other visions for the city, the Ridgeview community surrounding the site, and the future of this building typology.

The semester will be divided into 3 parts. We will begin with research and analysis of SITE’s designs, all of the BEST stores, and the 1979 theoretical exhibition Buildings for Best Products at MoMa, in order to understand the disciplinary history and the alternative visions for big box stores. Next, we will perform site research and collect and analyze examples of other adaptive reuse strategies that might inform our design visions. Finally, we will develop new proposals for the site through the combination of architecture and landscape strategies.


Tectonic Fragment
ARCH 650/850
Instructor:
Karl Wallick
BSAS students enroll in ARCH 650
M.Arch students enroll in ARCH 850

This studio focuses on detail as the generating condition for architecture. In architecture, detailing refers to any number of approaches that seek to reconcile technical constraints with poetic opportunities for space. In most cases, opportunities for detail occur at changes in orientation, material, or system. For instance, the way a brick is designed to turn the corner, or how a wall transitions into a roof. While such instances tend to occur at the ‘hand-scale’ (as opposed to building or site-scale) the definition of detail is not necessarily constrained by size or dimension.

We will begin working exclusively in model and in section. Seven individual sections to be precise. This methodology is called the tectonic fragment. Tectonic Fragments are a mindset that privileges the small-scale conditions of construction and assembly as a way of pre-figuring form versus a large scale shape-based approached to architecture. It reflects a belief that holistic design strategies can arise from careful study of isolated detailing conditions. In tectonic fragments, the word ‘tectonic’ refers to a long-established term in architecture and mans the way we build and how that sequence of fabrication and construction is manifest in terms of detail and form. In other words, tectonic conditions are based in issues of construction that prefigure architectural assembly. By studying or designing isolated building fragments (a column for instance) and their tectonic character (is it metal or stone, is there a defining shape, what are the limitations of this choice?) an architect will ultimately arrive at a more tightly synthesized building form.

Our attempt to activate marginal details will occur through a modest infill building program of a live-work studio and shop for a boat builder next to the river.


Farm & Forest
ARCH 650/850
Instructor:
Kyle Talbott
BSAS students enroll in ARCH 650
M.Arch students enroll in ARCH 850

The American Heartland is poised for a revival. The rural population is growing for the first time since the 1950s, and life in a rural setting appeals to a growing number of Americans, who see it as an antidote to congested, generic and expensive urban life. As more people yearn to reconnect with Nature, rural life offers a compelling model for how to do it: a horticultural lifestyle rich in meaning and with daily access to a beautiful, cultivated landscape. And yet how will rural communities grow? Most of the building stock is long decayed and beyond repair. Some old treasures have been remodeled, but these are mostly already claimed. What will the new rural architecture look like, and how will it contribute to the evolution of rural communities? This is the central question of the Farm & Forest studio.

The studio conducts creative design research to develop a new approach to rural architecture called Crossroad Kit Towns. In this model urbanites relocate to a rural crossroad and engage rural life on its terms, not as an agri-tourist simulation. This does not mean that everybody quits their corporate jobs and becomes farmers. The new arrivals – the entrepreneurs, light industrialists, software developers, corporate executives and retailers – weave into the preexisting rural fabric, co-existing with farmers, ranchers, horticulturalists and craftspeople. How can rural communities sprout and spread in this way without gentrifying rural culture out of existence? People need help re-envisioning what might happen at a crossroad and how this merging of cultures might unfold. What kind of businesses will thrive there? Additionally, because of conservative rural financing, people need inexpensive ways to get started. Crossroad Kit Towns offer answers to both questions. They offer tools to envision a new kind of rural life, and to implement it in affordable, meaningful architecture.

The Farm & Forest studio will produce a Catalogue of Rural Opportunities. People can get inspired by perusing its menu of traditional and innovative building types such as Farmstead, Mercantile, Light Industrial Warehouse, Career Academy, Auction House, Bed & Breakfast, Veterinary Clinic, Farm-to-Table Restaurant, Brewery and Coffee Club. Each of these aspects of rural life is then translated into architecture using a kit-built methodology, which has been widely used in rural communities for generations. Kit architecture is the architecture of rural America. It is inexpensive, straightforward and Do-It-Yourself. We propose to re-conceive not only what aspects of life might thrive at a crossroad, but to expand the role of kit-built architecture in rural life, harnessing its untapped potential to support the emerging rural revival.


Design Studios

Graduate Only

Comprehensive Design Studio: Campus Green-The UWM Chemistry Building
ARCH 825
Instructor:
Jim Wasley

Green Chemistry: A new Chemistry + Biochemistry interdisciplinary sciences building for the UWM Southwest Quad

This Comprehensive Design Studio will take on the challenge of designing a new chemistry and biochemistry building for the UWM campus.

This is a real project that we are seeking to influence. The chemistry building is the next building of the SW Quad in line to be replaced to meet the needs of a 21st C. Research University, following the construction of the IRC and the new Welcome Center. All of these buildings are a part of the recently completed Masterplan for the SW Quad, which included plans for sustainability initiatives by the Institute for Ecological Design and CDS. We will work with the ‘Ecological Waterscapes Plan for the SW Quad,’ which proposes a major water feature as the organizing spatial landscape feature integrated with the Chemistry building.

The proposed building has a complex program. Our specific focus will be to reconcile the desired size of building identified by CDS’s recent pre-design report with the Campus Masterplan, to reintegrate the Ecological Waterscape into the resulting site design, and to design in detail the public and interdisciplinary spaces of the first floors of the building and associated exterior spaces.

The project will be designed as a candidate for LEED PLATINUM certification, especially in regards to the performance of the envelope and the connection of the building to its site.

As a COMPPREHENSIVE studio, you will cycle through the project in detail from programming to environmental systems design to construction detailing, and will produce a comprehensive presentation of your individual designs.

Lewis Integrative Sciences Center, University of Oregon. LEED Platinum certified. HDR, THA Architects.
Lewis Integrative Sciences Center, University of Oregon. LEED Platinum certified. HDR, THA Architects.
An Ecological Waterscape for the SW Quad
Wildstyle: A Museum of Hip Hop (MoHipHop)
ARCH 850
Instructor:
Chris Cornelius

GrIn 1983 the film “Wild Style” was released bringing hip-hop, graffiti art and break dancing to a much wider audience. This film is regarded as an important part of hip-hop history in that it was the first time this culture was introduced in the mass media. Hip-hop (and jazz) is regarded as a truly American-born art form. Its roots are in New York and its Burroughs and it is inextricably tied to graffiti art and breakdancing.

This project will be a museum for hip-hop recognizing it as an important art form. The Cornell University Library has recently started archiving hip-hop, legitimizing it as an art. This studio project will be sited in the DUMBO area of Brooklyn, New York and will be a home for a collection much like the one at Cornell. We will concern ourselves with a very specific time-frame in hip-hop history that is its origins, in the late 1970s, to 2000. We will examine the associated art forms of graffiti and breaking along with MC-ing and DJ-ing. There will be an optional site visit planned for early October to NYC.