Committee Members in Academic Year 2020-21

Kate Webb (she/her) is a third-year graduate student in the Neuroscience program. A member of Dr. Christine Larson’s team (http://uwmlarsonlab.org), she investigates socio-environmental predictors of post-traumatic stress disorder. She is currently involved in the DDC’s Website Working Group and the Climate Survey Working Group. 

Amy Lang (she/her/hers) is a fifth-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology program. She is a member of Dr. W. Hobart Davies’ Child Stress and Coping Lab and her research involves investigating the psychological impact of chronic health conditions during adolescence and emerging adulthood. Amy is a current student co-chair of the Clinical Psychology Program Diversity Committee and is involved in the DDC’s Website Working Group.

Benjamin Katz (they/them) is a second-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology program. Ben is a member of Dr. Shawn Cahill’s Fear, Exposure and Anxiety Research Lab and their research interests center around sexual violence prevention among sexual and gender minorities and understanding the cognitive-behavioral mechanisms underlying treatment for Post-traumatic stress disorder. Ben is a current student co-chair of the Clinical Psychology Program Diversity Committee and a member of the Climate Survey Working Group.

Marcellus Merritt is an associate professor in the health psychology program. He is currently involved in the DDC’s Department Educational Working Group. His research program on stress and cardiovascular health disparities is comprised of three corresponding lines of work: 1) analysis of underlying social psychological and physiological stress factors for excess rates of cardiovascular disease risk among diverse family caregivers (e.g., trait active coping, socioeconomic deprivation and cardiovascular and neuroendocrine reactivity); 2) examination of how unique forms of stress management and solutions for health disparities like brief mindfulness meditation and leisure stress coping boost coping skills, enhance physiological recovery to acute mental stress, and promote nighttime blood pressure dipping among at-risk persons and; 3) assessment of electronic diary sampling of everyday stress responses and appraisal of 24-hour heart rate variability as indicators of the efficacy of behavioral and pharmacologic interventions in patients with autonomic disorders and chronic pain.

Nicole Schueler is the Academic Department Manager for the Psychology Department.  She administers the business operations for the department.  Nicole is involved in the DDC’s graduate student recruitment work group.

Krista Lisdahl is a Professor in the Department of Psychology. She teaches undergraduate courses (e.g., Psychopharmacology and Addiction, Clinical Neuropsychology, Abnormal Psychology) and graduate courses in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program (Assessment II, Clinical Neuropsychology Case Conference). She is Director of the UWM’s Brain Imaging and Neuropsychology (BraIN) Laboratory (https://www.uwmbrainlab.com/) and Principal Investigator or Consultant on four large-scale multi-site neuroimaging studies examining risk and resilience factors predicting substance use onset in adolescence and understanding the neurocognitive consequences of chronic, repeated drug use during adolescence and emerging adulthood [the MTA Neuroimaging Study; the IDEAA Consortium; ENIGMA; and the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study].  The lab also investigates health, sociocultural and biological factors that influence adolescent neuro, cognitive, and affective development. She is a member of the faculty and graduate student group awarded an Anti-Racism Action Grant from the UWM Office of Diversity Equity and Inclusion. Dr. Lisdahl serves as a Member of the Psychology Department Diversity Committee and is the faculty Co-Chair of the Clinical Program Diversity Committee.

Kristin Smith is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Psychology. She teaches undergraduate psychology courses at UWM and is also a primary supervisor for the assessment practicum in the UWM Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Program. Dr. Smith has 10 years of clinical experience working with children and young adults with a variety of neurodevelopmental and neurological disorders, in several neuropsychology practice settings. She has research interests in reducing test anxiety and fostering a growth mindset among college students. She is involved in the DDC’s undergraduate curriculum working group.

Ira Driscoll is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Physiological Psychology, Behavioral Neuroscience, and Psychology of Aging.  The work in her lab focuses on identifying protective and risk factors for age-related cognitive decline and dementia. Understanding the factors that protect some individuals from impairment and contribute to the maintenance of cognitive health will continue to underlie much of the future efforts. Dr. Driscoll is a current member of the Psychology Department Diversity Committee. 

Paulina Lim (she/her) is a doctoral student at the Clinical Psychology Program. She is a member of Dr. Davies’ Child Stress and Coping Lab. Her research involves exploring culturally conscious care with families from minoritized backgrounds in high stress pediatric settings. Paulina is involved in the Department Diversity Committee’s Education Working Group and the Clinical Psychology Diversity Committee’s research Working Group.

Kevin Grisales (he/him/his) is a first-year graduate student in the Neuroscience program. A member of Dr. Fred Helmstetter’s lab (https://sites.uwm.edu/fjh/) studying the neurobiology of learning and memory. Kevin is currently involved in the DDC’s Undergraduate Engagement Working Group.

Elizabeth Parisi (she/her) is a fourth-year predoctoral student in the Clinical Psychology program and a member of Dr. Christine Larson’s Affective Neuroscience Lab. Her research involves the use of neuroscience methods to investigate how individual differences in threat reactivity contribute to the development and maintenance of anxiety disorders. She is currently involved in the Clinical Psychology Program Diversity Committee Research working group and Psychology Department Diversity Committee Graduate Student Recruitment working group.

Chandler J. Zolliecoffer (she/her) is a fourth-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology program and a member of Dr. David Osmon’s Adult Neuropsychology Research Laboratory. Her research is broadly focused on the impact of stereotype threat on task performance, and attention and executive functioning skills within the context of cognitive performance. Chandler is one of the founding student co-chairs of the Clinical Psychology Program Diversity Committee and is a member of the Department Diversity Committee Education Working Group.

Brianna Young (she/her) is a second-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology program and member of Dr. Klein-Tasman’s Child Neurodevelopment Research Laboratory. Her research interests include early detection and intervention strategies for children with neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders and Williams syndrome. Brianna is currently serving as a Student Co-Chair of the Clinical Psychology Program Diversity Committee as well as the Psychology Department Diversity Committee.

Bonnie Klein-Tasman (she/her) is a Professor in the Department of Psychology. She teaches graduate courses in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program including Foundations of Psychotherapy, First Year Practicum, and Assessment Practicum. In the Child Neurodevelopment Research Lab, she and the undergraduate and graduate students in the lab conduct research about the development of children with genetically-based neurodevelopmental disorders (primarily Williams syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 1, and 7q11.23 duplication syndrome) including both behavioral phenotyping and intervention approaches. She serves as the Psychology Discipline Coordinator for the MCH-Pipeline Program, which is an undergraduate training program that prepares future professionals from underrepresented groups to provide culturally sensitive interdisciplinary services to children with special healthcare needs and their families, and for the WI LEND: Milwaukee Link program, a graduate and post-graduate program for developing leaders to improve services and supports for children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. Dr. Klein-Tasman is a member of the faculty and graduate student group awarded an Anti-Racism Action Grant from the UWM Office of Diversity Equity and Inclusion. Dr. Klein-Tasman serves as co-Chair of the Psychology Department Diversity Committee and is also a member of the Clinical Program Diversity Committee.

Rodney A. Swain is a Professor in the Department of Psychology.  He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Advanced Physiological Psychology, Behavioral Neuroscience, and Psychopharmacology and Addiction.  His research explores the intersection of behavior and neuromorphology. Specifically, his laboratory studies how motor learning and activity shape the architecture of the brain and in turn how these morphological changes affect subsequent behavior.  In addition, his laboratory has a long-term interest in understanding the nature of cerebellar involvement in cognition and how damage to this structure can provoke symptoms associated with ADHD and autism spectrum disorders.  He serves as the long-time chair of the campus IACUC and has also administratively served the campus as Psychology Department Chair, Associate Dean for Social Sciences, and Dean of the College of Letters and Science.  He currently serves as co-Chair of the Psychology Department Diversity Committee and is part of the working group on graduate student recruitment.