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May 2020

Michelle Larson: Postponed Until AY 2020/2021

May 8 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Lapham 160, 3209 N. Maryland Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53211 United States
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Michelle Larson, Adler Planetarium

Title and abstract TBA

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Ionel Popa: Postponed Until Fall 2020

May 1 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Lapham 160, 3209 N. Maryland Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53211 United States
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Ionel Popa, UWM Physics Faculty

Title and abstract TBA

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March 2020

Mark Williamsen: Postponed Until Fall 2020

March 27 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Lapham 160, 3209 N. Maryland Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53211 United States
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Mark Williamsen, Quantum Design

Title and abstract TBD

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Physics Colloquium – Wynn Ho

March 6 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Lapham 160, 3209 N. Maryland Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53211 United States
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Wynn Ho, Haverford College

The Impact of Pulsar Glitches and NICER on Gravitational Wave Searches

Pulsars are the rotating remnant of massive stars and are unique probes of dense matter physics. They are famous for having very precisely measured spin rates, and this spin evolves extremely regularly for most pulsars. However, young pulsars can occasionally undergo sudden spin changes, known as glitches.

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February 2020

Physics Colloquium – Gregory Rudnick

February 28 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Lapham 160, 3209 N. Maryland Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53211 United States
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Gregory Rudnick, University of Kansas

The Life Cycle of Galaxies in Clusters Over 10 Billion Years

Galaxies live in a range of environments, characterized by their volume density. For example, the densest regions of the Universe are in galaxy clusters, which contain hundreds to thousands of galaxies all in pseudo gravitational virial equilibrium. These dense environments can in turn alter the properties of the galaxies themselves in striking ways via a variety of gravitational and hydrodynamic processes. The result of these processes alter galaxy shapes, their internal dynamics, and shuts off the formation of new stars.

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Math and Physics Joint Colloquium – Dr. Tomáš Bzdušek

February 28 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
EMS E495, 3200 North Cramer Street
Milwaukee, WI 53211 United States
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Dr. Tomáš Bzdušek, Paul Scherrer Institute and University of Zurich

Mathematics of Topological Insulators and Semimetals

Many properties of crystalline materials, such as conductivity or the tendency to become magnetically ordered at low temperatures, derive from their so-called “electronic band structure.” Although this is an established notion in solid state physics, dating back to the early days of quantum mechanics, our understanding of electronic band structure has been greatly challenged and revolutionized over the past 15 years by the discovery of so-called topological materials.

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January 2020

Physics Colloquium – Andrew Ferguson

January 31 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Lapham 160, 3209 N. Maryland Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53211 United States
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Andrew Ferguson, University of Chicago

Reconstructing All-Atom Protein Folding from Low-Dimensional Experimental Time Series

Data-driven modeling and machine learning present powerful tools that are opening up new paradigms and opportunities in the understanding, discovery, and design of soft and biological materials. In the first part of this talk, I will describe an approach integrating ideas from dynamical systems theory and nonlinear manifold learning to reconstruct multidimensional protein folding funnels from the time evolution of single experimentally measurable observables.

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December 2019

Physics Colloquium – Chuck Steidel

December 6, 2019 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Lapham 160, 3209 N. Maryland Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53211 United States
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Chuck Steidel, Caltech

Imaging the "Baryon Cycle" of Forming Galaxies

The rapid increase in the universal star formation density between z~6 and z~2 (12.5-10.5 Gyr ago) was driven by high rates of accretion onto galaxy-scale dark matter halos, but was simultaneously modulated by energetic feedback from massive stars, supernovae, and AGN activity whose large-scale effects remain uncertain. The competition between rapid accretion from the intergalactic medium and outflows driven by sources of energy and momentum originating near a galaxy's center is arguably the least well-understood aspect of the current galaxy formation paradigm.

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November 2019

No Physics Colloquium – Thanksgiving Break

November 29, 2019
Lapham 160, 3209 N. Maryland Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53211 United States
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No Physics Colloquium this week due to the Thanksgiving holiday.

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Physics Colloquium – Peter M. Hoffmann

November 22, 2019 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Lapham 160, 3209 N. Maryland Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53211 United States
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Peter M. Hoffmann Wayne State University

The Physics of Life: Molecular Machines

Living beings are based on nanoscale machinery. This is no accident: the nanoscale is the only length scale at which autonomous, self-constructing machinery is possible. Only at this scale do thermal, electrical, chemical and mechanical energy scales converge. Moreover, this scale is dominated by thermal chaos. These unique circumstances give nanoscale systems the ability to easily transform different types of energy into each other and to self-assemble into ordered structures. Although living cells have taken advantage of the physics of the nanoscale for billions of years, technology is just beginning to exploit the very different rules governing this scale.

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