Breeding Bird Survey at the Cedarburg Bog

The Wisconsin Breeding Bird Atlas II is the second comprehensive field study to document the distribution and abundance of bird species across Wisconsin. The first Wisconsin Breeding Bird Atlas was conducted from 1995 through 2001. The second Atlas (WBBA II) will collect data from 2015 through 2019. Field work for the atlas is conducted in geographic “blocks” based on USGS quads across all of Wisconsin.

Long-term Monitoring of Bat Activity and Temperature at the Neda Mine Bat Hibernaculum

The Neda Mine, an abandoned iron mine located near Iron Ridge in Dodge Co., supports about 150,000 bats each winter, making it among the largest hibernacula in the midwest. The mine is used primarily by little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus), with northern bats (M. septentrionalis), eastern pipistrelles (Perimyotis subflavus), and big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) found in smaller numbers.

Survey of Hymenoptera Pollinator Populations on Washington Island, Wisconsin

Pollinating insects are highly beneficial in both natural ecosystems and agriculture, but many species are in decline. This project’s goal was to survey Hymenoptera pollinators on Washington Island, WI, and to explore factors influencing their abundance and diversity. The two sites included the Washington Island Butterfly House, which has undergone extensive prairie restoration, and Sweet Mountain Farm, an apiary breeding western honey bees.

Long-term Dynamics of Southeastern Wisconsin Prairie Remnants

Across the Midwest, less than one percent of pre-settlement prairies exist today – having been largely converted to agriculture via Euro-American settlement. These remnant communities often manifest in tiny, widely scattered and marginal populations of questionable viability. Understanding how the remaining remnants respond to both historical and changing environmental conditions is critical to managing their continued presence on the landscape.

Survey for Flying Squirrels at the UWM Field Station

Conservation of biodiversity requires accurate species lists for particular properties and monitoring of population trends over time, to detect population declines for species of interest before they become severe. The UWM Field Station property includes a high-quality old-growth beech-maple forest that is one of the best remaining examples of this type of forest in southeastern Wisconsin.

Use of Mark-Recapture Techniques to Estimate Turtle Populations at the UWM Field Station

Information on long-term trends in reptile populations can yield useful conservation information. This is particularly true because long-term monitoring projects that involve reptile populations are relatively uncommon, especially in Wisconsin. In 2006 we began an annual turtle survey on the Field Station Grounds, lasting for three days each year in late May/early June. We set turtle hoop traps approved by the Wisconsin DNR in several locations, which we checked daily during annual surveys. All of the animals captured were marked via marginal scute notches, following a well-established system.

Factors Controlling Diffusive CO2 Transport and Production in the Cedarburg Bog, Saukville, Wisconsin

Wetlands are vital components of the carbon cycle containing an estimated 20-30% of the global soil carbon store. The Cedarburg Bog of southeastern Wisconsin boasts a myriad of wetland habitats including the southernmost string bog found in North America. Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) behavior in these systems is the response of multiple interdependent variables that are, collectively, not well understood. Modeling this behavior in future climate scenarios requires detailed representation of relationships within highly diverse environments.

Handedness and Behavioral Lateralization in Anurans

Surviving and reproducing successfully depend on an animal’s ability to process information from the environment and respond adaptively. In many situations an individual must perform different activities at the same time (i.e. foraging and predator vigilance). If these activities compete for the same computational resource, for example, if both require visual or auditory attention, the brain’s ability to process the information may constrain the performance of both tasks.

Behavioral Ecology of Color Change in Gray Treefrogs

Gray treefrogs (Hyla versicolor) have amazing color change ability, and can range from dark brown to bright green. Yet, nothing is known about the distribution of body color in nature, or whether frogs choose their resting perches based on their body color, or adjust body color as a function of ambient color or temperature. Here, we examine the behavioral ecology of color change in gray treefrogs. Color change can function to hide the individual from predators (crypsis), or to make the individual obvious for conspecifics (conspicuousness). In addition, in ectotherms (cold blooded animals), body color may help with thermoregulation (darker colors heat up better, brighter colors increase reflection and stay cooler).

Audiovisual Integration and Leader Preferences

Humans perceive several sounds in close temporal succession as a single event originating from the location of the leading sound, a trick played by the auditory system to improve sound localization. Surprisingly, a visual cue associated with the leading sound enhances sound localization, while a visual cue associated with the lagging sound inhibits it, suggesting that auditory spatial perception in humans is a fundamentally multisensory process.