UWM Researcher Studies Importance of Diversity in Recruiting, Retaining Teachers

Curtis Jones, director of the Office of Socially Responsible Evaluation in Education.

African American and Latinx K-12 teachers in Wisconsin are more likely to leave their schools than their white counterparts, according to a study by UWM education researchers.

The report also found that African American teachers feel lower levels of trust with fellow teachers than white or Latinx teachers, which likely factors into the higher likelihood of leaving for African American educators.

The results can provide direction to Wisconsin schools to create environments that help recruit and retain teachers of color. Doing so has the potential to narrow Wisconsin’s wide achievement gaps, said Curtis Jones, director of the Office of Socially Responsible Evaluation in Education. He noted previous research showing that teachers of color have higher academic expectations of students of color than white teachers do.

“At least in part due to those expectations, having at least one experience of having a teacher of color throughout elementary school of the same racial background makes you much more likely to graduate high school on time and go to college,” Jones said. “So it has a lasting impact on these students.”

To read the rest of the story, visit the UWM Report webpage.