College of Engineering & Applied Science

Fall 2017 Joint Bioengineering Seminar Series
(September 8, September 29, October 20, November 10, December 15, 2017)

September 29, 2017
“Predictive Analytics and an Application in Predicting Survivability across Different Cancer Types”

Rohit J. Kate, PhD
Department of Health Informatics and Administration,
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/

September 8, 2017
“A Working Hypothesis to Explain the Role of Charge Relaxation in the Progression of Tissue from Benign to Cancer”

William D. Gregory, PhD, PE, IEEE Senior Member,
Chief Science Officer, NovaScan Inc.

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/

Spring 2017 Joint Bioengineering Seminar Series
(February 3, February 24, March 17, April 28, 2017)

March 17, 2017
“Context-Dependent Coding of Motor Behavior in Primary Motor and Premotor Cortices”

Aaron J. Suminski
Department of Neurological Surgery and Biomedical Engineering
University of Wisconsin-Madison

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/

February 24, 2017
“Applications of Finite Element Analysis in Biomechanics: Design, Development and Control”

Arash Razmjoo, Ph.D.
Industrial And Manufacturing Engineering research associate
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/

February 3, 2017
“Robotic Exoskeleton for Rehabilitation and Motion Assist: Design, Development and Control”

M. Habib Rahman, PhD
Assistant Professor at Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering
Director of Biorobotics Lab at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/

CEAS Distinguished Lecture Series (February 17, 2017)


“Towards Personalized Medicine: Ultra Sensitive Graphene Microfluidics Point of Care Devices”

Venkatesan Renugopalakrishnan
Harvard Medical School

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/

Fall 2016 Joint Bioengineering Seminar Series
(September 30th, October 21st, November 11th, 2016)

November 11, 2016
“4D Flow MRI: Assessment of Hemodynamics Using MRI”

Susanne Schnell, PhD
Dept. of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill.

Dr. Schnell demonstrates her research and use of 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging of blood flow through human organs using color imaging components indicating flow rate and volume. She discusses the benefits and challenges of this emerging technology’s use, and the hope of creating a hybrid imaging system.

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/

October 21, 2016
“Bio-Inspired Sensing in Smart Materials”

Nathan Salowitz, PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Professor Salowitz brings an extensive background of study and experience in Aeronautics and Astronautics including micro and nano damage and strain detection and analysis to the focus on bio-inspired systems that include dense sensing and self-healing systems.

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/

September 30, 2016
“Revascularization of the Heart by Laser”

Mahmood Mirhoseini, M.D., D.Sc., F.A.C.S., F.A.C.C.
Heart and Lung Institute of Wisconsin

Coronary artery disease is a major cause of death in the United States. The heart contains blood in its cavities, but it’s blood supply is by way of the two coronary arteries. Blockage of these arteries causes death to the heart muscle or pain (angina) by lack of adequate blood supply. Coronary artery bypass surgery, angioplasty, stents or medical management have been methods of treatment. When arteries are severely and diffusely diseased these methods are not applicable.

The reptile heart has small coronary arteries, and much of the blood supply to the ventricle comes from within the ventricular cavity itself through small channels in the muscle. Our team developed a method of creating similar channels in the diseased human heart by laser.

From the concept developed in 1968, followed by 20 years of research, full FDA approval was granted. However, our team believes the prototype laser we used, under the auspices of Thomas Polyani, PhD and Herbert Breidermier, PhD of American Optical, was superior to what is commercially available.

Much work and development, with the collaboration of engineers and physicists, is needed to develop a commercial laser that will create channels that remain open.

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/

Spring 2016 Joint Bioengineering Seminar Series (February 12th, March 4th, March 25th, April 15th, 2016)

April 15, 2016

“Trans to cis isomerization in a biologial macro-molecule observed with ultrafast time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography”

Marius Schmidt PhD
Professor of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

DUE TO PRIVACY RESTRICTIONS, TODAY’S PLANNED LIVESTREAM COULD NOT TAKE PLACE AND COULD NOT BE RECORDED.

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/

March 25, 2016
“The Physics of Proteins Under Force”

Iola Popa PhD
Assistant Professor of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Dr. Popa will discuss a new research technique and the uncovering of a new mechanism for muscle contraction that places protein folding as an important mechanism where tandem multidomain proteins can adjust the elasticity of tissue and deliver or store energy based on changes in an experienced force.

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/

March 4, 2016

“Quantitative Biomechanics of Manual Wheelchair Mobility in Children and Adults with Spinal Chord Injury”

Brooke A. Slavens PhD
Dept. of Occupational Science and Technology, and Director of Movement Analysis for Biomedical Innovation and Technology (Mobility) Lab, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Currently, there is limited research of the biomechanics of pediatric manual wheelchair mobility. Specifically, the biomechanics of functional tasks and their relationship to joint pain and health is not well understood. To contribute to this knowledge gap, a quantitative rehabilitation approach was applied for characterizing upper extremity biomechanics of manual wheelchair mobility in children and adolescents during propulsion, starting and stopping tasks. This research found that joint demands are significantly different amongst functional tasks, with greatest demands placed on the shoulder during the starting task. We identified multiple stroke patterns used by the children, some of which are not standard in adults. It can be concluded that functional tasks should be considered in addition to propulsion for rehabilitation and spinal cord injury (SCI) treatment planning. This research provides wheelchair users and clinicians with a comprehensive, biomechanical, mobility assessment approach for wheelchair prescription, training, and long-term care of children with SCI.

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/

February 12, 2016
“Quaternary Structure of Proteins in Living Cells Probed with the Novel Method of FRET Spectrometry”

Valerica Raicu, PhD, Physics Dept. and Dept. of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and holder of several patents in the area of optical microspectroscopy.
Presentation on the novel use of a two-photon microscope with spectral resolution for detection of spectral shifts to extract quantitative supra-molecular information by the interaction of excited fluorescent and unexcited (acceptor) molecules. Recent results of studies of oligomeric complexes of membrane proteins in living cells will also be presented.

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/

Fall 2015 Joint Bioengineering Seminar Series     (September 18th, October 9th, October 30th, 2015)

October 30, 2015
“Computational Modeling of Blood Flow in Brain Aneurysms”

Cerebral aneurysms are localized dilatations of arteries feeding the brain. Large cerebral aneurysms present a danger of rupture or brain compression. In some cases, clinicians consider various flow-altering procedures in the hope that decreasing the flow through the aneurysm would inhibit its progression. Our research objective is to develop a patient-specific CFD methodology that could provide guidance to clinicians by modeling postoperative flow fields that would result from alternative surgical procedures.

Vitaliy L. Rayz, Ph.D, is with the UWM Mechanical Engineering Department and the Medical College of Wisconsin Neurosurgery Department. His research on numerical modeling of blood flow in brain aneurysms is funded by the National Institute of Health.

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/

Joint Bioengineering Seminar Series

October 9, 2015
“Robot Aided Upper-Extremity Rehabilitation and Motion Assist”

The World Health Organization reports that stroke affects more than 17 million people worldwide each year. Among these, 85% of stroke survivors will incur acute arm impairment, and 40% of victims are chronically impaired or permanently disabled. Recent studies have revealed that stroke-affected patients who received robot-assisted therapy showed significant reduction in motor impairments and regained significant functional abilities.

Mohammad Habibur Rahman, Ph.D, with the UWM Mechanical Engineering Department will highlight research challenges of robotic interventions for upper-extremity rehabilitation, his ongoing research works in this area (which includes wearable robotics), and some future works of this technology.

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/

Joint Bioengineering Seminar Series

September 18, 2015
“Commercializing Biomedical Innovations”

Universities are rich sources of new ideas and innovations, particularly in the area of biomedical engineering. However, getting great ideas from the laboratory to the marketplace is not an easy process.

Brian Thompson, President of the UWM Research Foundation will explore commercialization of biomedical innovations. He will highlight the latest in “lean launch” methodologies including techniques to explore markets through the “customer discovery” process – techniques that are central to UWM’s National Science Foundation (NSF) Milwaukee I-Corp Site. Thompson will highlight the goals of the NSF I-Corps program which seeks to educate 90 teams in the customer discovery process over the three year program and growing programs to support innovation and entrepreneurship at UWM. Additional topics, including intellectual property, technology licensing, and FDA regulatory pathway will provide context for the process, including commercializing technologies in the university setting.

For more information visit:
The UWM College of Engineering & Applied Science website:
http://uwm.edu/engineering/