Gevon Daynuah

Gevon Daynuah
daynuah@uwm.edu
414-227-3351
Program Manager
Business and Technology

Ms. Gevon Daynuah has been a Child and Youth Care Worker for nearly 15 years. She has worked with children and families in a variety of capacities, facilitating trainings through out the state of Wisconsin, regional Midwest as well as the Triennial International Child and Youth Care Conferences, attracting participants from countries such as Canada, Ireland, and South Africa. Currently Gevon manages and facilitates trainings in the Department of Governmental Affairs in the Nonprofit Management and Public Administration Certificate Programs. Her background with Nonprofits, Community Based Organizations, The Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare System, and other community stakeholders are just a few ways she easily navigates and contributes to the mission of continuous learning at UWM. Prior to this, her experience included work as a kinship care provider, group home activities coordinator, after-school community liaison, and volunteer youth-worker at a shelter for homeless and runaway teens.

Gevon earned her Bachelors degree through the Educational Policy and Studies Department at UWM’s School of Education with honorable recognition from the department of African American Student Services. Ms. Daynuah has written and published articles online through CYC-NET.org and is noted as managing editor of the Journal of Child and Youth Care Work v. 21, an annual publication with scholarly articles and the latest research-generating knowledge and effective practices in the field. She is certified as a PACE (Parent Alternative Care Education) trainer through out the State of Wisconsin, (a program that provides pre-service training to treatment foster parents). Familiar with all aspects of programming, Gevon plays an essential role in the planning and implementation of educational courses and at the School of Continuing Education. She continues to play an active role in community outreach, collaborations, and work involving community development as well as nonprofit and public sector advocacy and enrichment.

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