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Electrical Equipment Aging and Service Life Considerations

Get acquainted with aging mechanisms and the aging considerations for components found in substations. As craftsmen, engineers, supervisors and managers who are responsible for performing, supervising and scheduling maintenance activities, being proactive is vital.

This course can be applied to the Electrical Engineering Certificate.

Instructors

Jenifer Marchesi

Jenifer Marchesi

Jenifer Marchesi has spent the last six years performing failure analysis and aging/degradation studies for the power industry. The “soft parts” of electrical systems are frequently the weakest link, since they are inherently less stable and less durable than metals. ... read more

Anthony Sleva, P.E.

Anthony Sleva, P.E.

Mr. Sleva is President of Sleva Associates, an electrical consulting and training company founded in 1995. He is a registered Professional Engineer with a BSEE degree from Pennsylvania State University. During his career, he has designed electrical systems for nuclear ... read more

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for craftsmen, engineers, supervisors and managers who are responsible for performing, supervising and scheduling maintenance activities; determining periodic maintenance needs; or determining end-of-life for substation components.

Benefits and Learning Outcomes

  • Identify recognized failure modes and aging indicators
  • Gain insight into periodic and in-service testing
  • Save money by being proactive and avoiding repair/replacement costs
  • Become acquainted with aging mechanisms

Course Outline/Topics

Day 1:  Introduction

  • Materials Used to Fabricate Electrical Components
  • Degradation Mechanisms
    – Degradation Mechanisms for All Materials
    – Specific Electrical Degradation Mechanisms
  • Manufacturing Issues
  • Life Cycle Considerations
  • Critical Material Properties
  • Conductors
  • Insulators and Insulation
  • Mechanical Protection
  • Support Structures
  • Indicators of Aging
  • Service Life

Day 1:  Monitoring, Testing, and Observations

  • Monthly Inspections
  • Data Bases, Historical Data, Trending
  • Instrumentation
  • Scheduled Maintenance
  • Unscheduled Maintenance
  • Electrical Tests
  • Other Tests
  • Thermography
  • Forensic Analysis of Failed Components

Day 2:  High Voltage Components

Typical aging mechanisms and leading indicators of degradation are presented for the following high voltage components:

  • Insulators
  • Insulating Covers
  • Bushings
  • Transformers
  • Circuit Breakers
  • VTs
  • CTs (free standing)
  • CCVTs
  • Air Break Switches
  • Reclosers
  • Buses & Bus Duct
  • Cables
  • Cable Seals and Cable Terminations
  • Generators
  • Motors
  • Capacitors

Day 3:  Low Voltage Components

Typical aging mechanisms and leading indicators of degradation are presented for the following low voltage components:

  • Control Relays
  • Protective Relays
  • Lockout Relays
  • Low Voltage Circuit Breakers
  • Fuses
  • Fuse Holders
  • CTs
  • Cables
  • Connectors
  • Batteries
  • Battery Chargers
  • Uninterruptible Power Supplies
  • Capacitors

All sessions are Face-to-Face unless otherwise noted.

Mon.-Wed., June 5-7, 2017

8am-4:30pm

Location: UWM School of Continuing Education

Instructors:
Jenifer Marchesi Ph.D.
Anthony Sleva P.E.

Fee:

$1,295 if you register by Wed., Apr. 5, 2017.
$1,395 if you register after Wed., Apr. 5, 2017.

CEUs: 2, PDHs: 20

Enrollment Limit: 40

Program Number: 4840-9719

Registration Deadline: Mon., June 5, 2017

Register Now