UWM to host first US Bicycle & Motorcycle Dynamics Symposium

Every three years, the small and wildly enthusiastic community of leading researchers in bicycle and motorcycle dynamics gather somewhere in the world to discuss topics like wobble and weave.

James Brendelson (left), manager of vehicle dynamics and simulation at Harley-Davidson, and Andrew Dressel, a mechanical engineering lecturer at UWM’s College of Engineering & Applies Science, are helping bring the International Symposium on Bicycle & Motorcycle Dynamics to Milwaukee. (UWM Photo/Carolyn Bucior)

James Brendelson (left), manager of vehicle dynamics and simulation at Harley-Davidson, and Andrew Dressel, a mechanical engineering lecturer at UWM’s College of Engineering & Applies Science, are helping bring the International Symposium on Bicycle & Motorcycle Dynamics to Milwaukee. (UWM Photo/Carolyn Bucior)

This year, for the first time, the International Symposium on Bicycle & Motorcycle Dynamics will meet in the United States — Sept. 21-23 at UWM’s School of Continuing Education Conference Center — thanks to the combined efforts of a UWM College and Engineering & Applied Science instructor, a UWM alumni who works at Harley-Davidson, and a MSOE assistant professor.

The conference — which has drawn scientists from Japan, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Italy and the United States — is being spearheaded by Andrew Dressel, a mechanical engineering lecturer at UWM’s College of Engineering & Applies Science; James Brendelson (2010 PhD Engineering, ’93 MS Engineering), manager of vehicle dynamics and simulation at Harley-Davidson, Inc.; and Aaron Armstrong, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Milwaukee School of Engineering.

“It’s great to be part of the collaboration between UWM, MSOE and Harley-Davidson,” Dressel said. “The vibrant bike industry in the city and state make Milwaukee an obvious choice of venue.”

Harley-Davidson, Dunlop Motorcycle Tires and Calspan have joined UWM to sponsor this symposium. Topics will include robot riders, tires, human control, rider properties, aerodynamics, simulators and nonholonomic dynamics. An evening event at the Harley-Davidson Museum will be the symposium’s highlight, Dressel said.

“It’s a terrific opportunity to connect in the relatively small and dispersed field of bike dynamics,” Dressel said. “It’s nice to be reminded that there are others around the world interested in this topic and that we are not working alone.”