Research

Keenan, Kevin

Dr. Keenan’s work is dedicated to understanding the interplay between motor function, physical activity, and health. Experimental procedures used in the laboratory include high-density surface EMG arrays (up to 256 EMG recordings), long-term (>6 hrs) EMG recordings, indwelling EMG recordings, force sensors, motion capture, and computational modeling.  To see Dr. Keenan’s full profile, click here. Click here to see Dr. Keenan’s vitae.

Current Projects:
Current collaborative projects being pursued in the lab include: the role of physical activity on motor function in older adults; assessment of muscle coordination during finger pressing tasks in young and older adults; the role of EMG biofeedback to improve chronic neck pain; the change in neuromuscular control in stroke survivors, and the noninvasive assessment of neuromuscular properties using high-density EMG arrays.

Kwak, Jung

Dr. Kwak’s research area focuses on how family caregivers of persons with advanced dementia or Parkinson disease. Two primary areas of research focus on development and evaluation of (1) decision support interventions for family caregivers making informed medical decisions for their relatives at the end of life, and (2) care management strategies to support diverse family caregivers of persons with advanced chronic illnesses. Her recent studies have been funded by grant support from the Hartford Geriatric Social Work Faculty Scholar program, Parkinson Research Institute at Aurora Sinai Medical Center, and the Center for Aging and Translational Research.  To see Dr. Kwak’s full profile, click here. Click here to see Dr. Kwak’s vitae.

Current Projects:
Dr. Kwak is currently conducting a pilot study to test the acceptability and feasibility of a decision coaching protocol to assist healthcare professionals and family caregivers making medical decisions for persons with end-stage dementia or Parkinson disease. The pilot study is examining the feasibility of implementing a decision coaching protocol with evidence-based decision aids with family caregivers of persons with advanced dementia in acute and long-term care managed care settings.

Montgomery, Rhonda

Dr. Montgomery is Professor Emerita, having recelently retired from the Helen Bader Endowed Chair of Applied Gerontology in the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare and Professor in the Department of Sociology.  She is also a Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America.  Prior to joining the faculty of UWM, she held positions at the University of Kansas, Wayne State University and the University of Washington.  Dr. Montgomery has conducted numerous regional and national studies focused on public policy, the role of the family, and the role of staff in providing long term care.  Dr. Montgomery has published over 100 articles and books. Her work has been supported by private foundations, the Alzheimer’s Association, the Administration on Aging, the National Institutes of Health, and the Health Resources Services Administration. To see Dr. Montgomery’s full profile, click here. Click here to see Dr. Montgomery’s vitae.

Current Projects:
While Endowed Chair, Dr. Montgomery worked with colleagues at UWM and the University of Nebraska, and more than 30 community based organizations to develop and test a comprehensive system to support family caregivers. The Tailored Caregiver Assessment and Referral® (TCARE®) is a care management process used to support family caregivers of older adults and wounded warriors. In 2010, Dr. Montgomery’s team and the Washington Association of Area Agencies of Aging jointly received the Rosalyn Carter Institute’s Leadership in Caregiving Award for their development of TCARE®.  In 2012, with assistance from the UWM Research Foundation, Dr. Montgomery launched TCARE Navigator, LLC. to commercialize and expand the use of the TCARE® protocol, which is now used by more than 250 organizations.

Strath, Scott

Dr. Strath joined UWM in 2003 and is a professor in the Department of Kinesiology, Exercise Science and Health Promotion. He holds affiliate appointments with the Medical College of Wisconsin, as well as the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Strath’s primary research focus revolves around physical activity and public health. Specific interests include the relationship between physical activity, cardiovascular, metabolic and functional health in the elderly; physical activity promotional strategies for the elderly; physical activity assessment; physical activity epidemiology; community and national physical activity patterns; and environmental determinants of physical activity behavior for the elderly. To see Dr. Strath’s full profile, click here. Click here to see Dr. Strath’s vitae.

Current Projects:
For information on current projects, click here.

Swartz, Ann

Dr. Swartz’s research interests center on the health benefits of physical activity for adults and older adults including: relationships between physical activity, sedentary behavior, health and obesity level; novel, translational physical activity and sedentary behavior interventions to improve health, and the impact of sedentary behavior on metabolic health. To see Dr. Swartz’s full profile, click here. Click here to view Dr. Swartz’s vitae.

Current Projects:
For information on current projects, click here.

Wang, Jinsung

In his research, Dr. Wang attempts to delineate the neural mechanisms that underlie hemispheric lateralization and interlimb transfer of motor control and learning. He is interested in research questions such as how movement information is stored, represented and retrieved in the brain, and how such information is transferred between the two brain hemispheres. To study these questions, he often investigates how learning a novel task generalizes across different movement conditions (e.g., transfer of visuomotor or dynamic adaptation tasks from one limb to the other, or from bilateral to unilateral training conditions). He is also interested in investigating other issues of motor control/learning, which include observational learning, handedness, the effect of perception on motor learning, etc. Dr. Wang investigated these motor control/learning issues primarily with healthy young adults and individuals with Parkinson’s disease in his previous research. His current/future research directions also involve testing stroke patients with hemiparesis and upper limb amputees, employing psychophysical experiments and functional MRI. To see Dr. Wangs’s full profile, click here. Click here to view Dr. Wang’s vitae.

Current Projects:
Dr. Wang is currently working on a project in which he investigates hemispheric lateralization for motor control and learning in healthy older adults. In this study, he is also investigating the association between the level of physical activity and hemispheric motor lateralization by comparing the pattern of interlimb transfer of motor learning between physically active and sedentary older adults.