Students with Disabilities

As you prepare to move into the workforce, whether it be for a part-time job, an internship or your first destination post-graduation, there are several things to consider if you are a student with a disability.

  1. Students with disabilities often develop unique, extra transferrable skills out of necessity to ensure equal access to the learning environment:
    • verbal communication
    • time management
    • forethought and planning
    • problem solving

These skills are among the top-rated areas of strength employers search for when reviewing resumes and interviewing candidates. Unfortunately, these skills are too often hidden or forgotten when resumes are written, or individuals have difficulty providing clear examples of these skills during interviews.

  1. You may already be familiar with accommodation requests to faculty. Both your needs for accommodation and the process to make the requests will change significantly once you enter the workforce. Talking with the staff at the Accessibility Resource Center should be first on your resource list.
  1. Finally, disability disclosure and its effect on your employment chances create potential outcomes of unconscious bias. What employers may infer from your student organizations and other associations might make you reconsider how much you share.