Douglas Steeber

Associate Professor
 (414) 229-4373
 Lapham Hall N211

Education and Experience

  • Assistant Research Professor, Dept. of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, 1997-2003
  • Postdoctoral Research Associate, Dept. of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, 1995-1997
  • PhD, Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences, Specialty in Immunology, University of Wisconsin – Madison, 1995

Research Interests

My laboratory is interested in the process of leukocyte migration as occurs during normal immune surveillance, inflammation and tumor development. We are particularly interested in understanding the molecular interactions and signaling pathways that regulate this migration. To determine how the migration of specific populations of leukocytes is controlled, my laboratory uses a combination of cellular, molecular, imaging, and flow cytometric approaches in both in vitro and in vivo systems.

Current studies in the lab focus on the role of adhesion molecules in regulating leukocyte recruitment to sites of inflammation, including tumors. For our in vitro studies we make use of a number of transfected leukocyte and endothelial-like cell lines expressing specific adhesion molecules of interest. Interactions between the leukocytes and endothelial cell lines under flow conditions are analyzed using high-speed digital microscopy. These same cell lines are also used to examine transendothelial migration using chemotaxis assays. We are using pharmacologic inhibitors to define the intracellular signaling pathways that are involved in regulating this migration. For our in vivo studies we utilize multiple transgenic lines of mice to examine the migration pathways of specific leukocyte populations during an immune response. These studies are providing new information on these processes that can be applied to developing new therapies for blocking unwanted leukocyte migration as occurs in pathological conditions of chronic inflammation such as in rheumatoid arthritis, lupus or cancer.

Selected Publications

Krystofiak, E. S., Matson, J. J., Steeber, Douglas A., and Oliver, J. A. “Elimination of tumor cells using folate receptor targeting by antibody-conjugated, gold-coated magnetite nanoparticles in a murine breast cancer model.” Journal of Nanomaterials Article ID 431012. (2012).
Subramanian, H., Grailer, J. J., Ohlrich, K. C., Rymaszewski, A. L., Loppnow, J. J., Kodera, M., Conway, R. M., and Steeber, Douglas A. “Signaling through L-selectin mediates enhanced chemotaxis of lymphocyte subsets to secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine.” Journal of Immunology 188.7 (2012): 3223-36.
Zeng, Q., Laiosa, Michael, Steeber, Douglas A., Biddle, E. M., Peng, Q., and Yang, Ching-Hong. “Cell individuality: the bistable gene expression of T3SS in Dickeya dadantii 3937.” Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact. 25.1 (2012): 37-47.
Ohmatsu, H., Kadono, T., Sugaya, M., Tomita, M., Kai, H., Miyagaki, T., Saeki, H., Tamaki, K., Steeber, Douglas A., Tedder, T. F., and Sato, S. “α4β7 Integrin is essential for contact hypersensitivity by regulating migration of T cells to skin.” The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 126.6 (2010): 1267-76.
Grailer, J. J., Kodera, M., and Steeber, Douglas A. “L-selectin: role in regulating homeostasis and cutaneous inflammation.” Journal of Dermatological Science 56.3 (2009): 141-147.
Kodera, M., Grailer, J. J., Karalewitz, A. P., Subramanian, H., and Steeber, Douglas A. “T lymphocyte migration to lymph nodes is maintained during homeostatic proliferation.” Microscopy and Microanalysis 14.3 (2008): 211-24.